Jelly Turnover Quilt


Hello! I’m Shannon from Modern Tradition Quilts.  It’s an honor for me to be with you today on Moda Bake Shop.  I love working with pre-cut fabrics.  When it comes to creating quilts, the possibilities are endless!  When designing this quilt, I thought it would be fun to use a jelly-roll for the sashing and candy squares for the gem-stone corners–after all, they are already pre-cut to the same width.  All that was left was to decide what type of blocks to use.  Since charm squares create half-square triangles so readily, this quilt came together like “Peanut-butter & Jelly”–hence its name, the Jelly Turnover Quilt.

To create this project you will need:
  • One packages of 5″ charm squares.  (I used Grant Park)  This quilt uses 40 print squares.
  • One packages of 5″ bella solids charm squares.  This quilt uses 40 white squares.
  • Three packages of 2 1/2″ candy squares for the gem stone corners on the sashing. (I also used Grant Park).  This quilt uses 99 squares.
  • One 2 1/2″ jelly roll for the sashing (I also used bella solid white).  This quilt uses 23 strips.
  • One yard navy blue fabric for the binding. 

    To create the half-square triangles (HSTs):

    • Draw a diagonal line on the wrong side of each white Bella solid charm square.
    • Layer one white charm square on top of one print charm square with right sides facing.
    • Sew down both sides of the drawn line.

    • Cut down the drawn line and press seams towards the darker print fabric.
    • Square all HSTs to measure exactly 4 1/2 inches. 
    Use your favorite method of choice for this.  I like using a small square ruler.  Basically, you are trimming off the factory-created pinked/serrated edges.
    • Yield: 80 HSTs.

      To create the sashing:

      • Select twenty-three 2 1/2 inch jelly roll strips.
      • Cut the 2 1/2 inch white strips from the jelly roll into 4 1/2 inch sections.  Yield: 16 sashing rectangles measuring 2 1/2 inches by 4 1/2 inches per jelly roll length.
      Quick tip:  It is easy to cut several jelly-roll strips at once by laying 5 or 6 strips on your cutting board at a time.  Then, simply make the same rotary cuts that you would doing just one strip at a time.
      • This quilt requires 178 of these rectangles.

        To sew the vertical sashing units:

        • Select five 2 1/2 inch by 4 1/2 inch strips and five 2 1/2″ candy squares.  Sew these end to end to create a vertical sashing strip.  Press all seams towards the sashing to reduce bulk.  Create 18 of these strips.

        • Sew one horizontal sashing row for the bottom of the quilt.  It is comprised of nine 2 1/2 inch candy squares and eight 2 1/2 inch by 4 1/2 inch sashing strips.

        Note: This quilt is sewn in four quadrants–one quadrant at a time to ensure the proper placement of the HST unit to make the echo effect.  Each quadrant uses 20 HSTs.

        General directions for sewing all four quadrants:

        • Take twenty HSTs and  twenty 2 1/2 inch by 4 1/2 inch rectangles.
        • Chain-sew the 2 1/2 inch by 4 1/2 inch rectangle to the top of the HST.  Check the orientation of the HST you are working on as they differ in all four quadrants.  Press all seams towards the sashing to create less bulk.

        Note, the HST rotates depending on which quadrant of the quilt you are working on.
        • Sew this units into four columns of 5 units down.  Press all seams towards the sashing to create less bulk.
        • Add four vertical sashing strips to the side of each of the four 5-unit columns.  Refer to the quadrant diagram to check if it is the right or left-hand side.  If pressed correctly, these seams should nest.  Pin-match the intersections and sew with the HSTs on top to avoid blunting the points.  Also press these seams towards the sashing.  This will enable the quilt top to lie flat.
        Sew the columns together with HSTs on top so their points do not get blunted.
        • Sew these four columns together to create one quadrant.

          The upper left-hand quadrant HST orientation is: 

          The upper right-hand quadrant HST orientation is:

          The lower left-hand quadrant HST orientation is

          The lower right-hand quadrant HST orientation is:

          Use this assembly diagram to add the four quadrant panels together.

          • First, add the top left-hand quadrant to a center vertical sashing strip, then add the right-hand upper quadrant.
          • Second, add the bottom left-hand quadrant to a center vertical sashing strip, then add the right-hand lower quadrant.
          • Third, sew the top and bottom halves together.
          • Fourth and final, add the long horizontal sashing strip to the bottom to finish your quilt top.
          Assembly Diagram

          The finished quilt top diagram:


          The finished quilt top measures 50 inches by 62 inches.

          I quilted this using a lasso edge-to-edge style.

          Shannon Mower
          {moderntraditionquilts.blogspot.com}

          Scrappy Scrunchies


          Hello again! This is Karin from Cascade Quilts with a cute quick project for the girls on your Christmas list! These would make great stocking stuffers! I have to admit, I have a lot of hair scrunchies and I wear them often! They are easy and fun to make to coordinate with different outfits/holidays 🙂 Stop by my website where I will be having a giveaway for some of these adorable scrunchies AND a mini charm pack so someone can make a couple of their own!


          For EACH scrunchie, you will need: 

          • 20 Moda Candy pieces (2½” squares) – I used ‘Wishes’ by Sweetwater, ‘From Outside In’ by Malka Dubrawski, and ‘Grant Park’ by Minick and Simpson
          • 7″ to 8” of ⅜” wide elastic 


          This project works with other precuts, as well. Substitute the 20 Moda Candy pieces with:

          • 5 charm squares 
          • 1 jelly roll strip
          • Half of a dessert roll strip 

          • 2/3 yard lace or ric-rac for each scrunchie

           If you are using mini charms, sew your 20 mini charms into two rows of 10 mini charms and press.

          If you are going to use lace or ric-rack, cut to length of your pieced strips and lay on one edge of the pieced strip with the edge you want showing facing IN and far enough from the edge that your 1/4” seam will not hide it all in the seam.

          The large ric-rac works well as you can line it up JUST inside of the edge and 1/4” seam is pretty much right down the center of the ric-rac then.

          Sew your 1/4” seam to encase the lace or ric-rac.  Press with right sides out.

           Optional: top stitch with a scant 1/8” seam

          Now, you are going to make a tube with your strips.

          Using a 1/4” seam, stitch your strips to form a tube.

          Here is where it might get a little confusing.  Trust me, this works if you follow closely.  with the tube laying flat, take the center of the top of the tube and fold it in thirds.  You are just folding this to get it out of the way to stitch the bottom portion together without getting the top portion in the seam.

          Now take the bottom section and fold it right sides together (you will be encasing the part you folded in thirds)

          Now, start stitching your 1/4” seam, making SURE not to catch the inside material, you are only stitching the outside 2 edges together.

          Once you get a few inches, you will need to start pulling the center out from the tube.

          Keeping your needle down, just start pulling the center out and forward.  You might have to help it along near the rear of the needle too.  Line up the new edges you pulled through and continue sewing.

          Sew a few inches, pull out a few inches…..

          Continue sewing until you have a small opening 2-3” left.  Backstitch.  I know this seems confusing…. I, too, was unsure this was going to work when I sewed my first one.  But, believe me, it works!  And, the next one will be much easier after you ‘get’ it 🙂

          Pull the whole fabric tube right side out.  The opening will be to feed the elastic through.

          Totally optional – press your fabric tube.

          Feed your elastic through the tube and tie the ends, then stitch the opening closed with as narrow seam as you can.

          Viola!  One super cute scrappy scrunchie!  I have tried several different ways to sew scrunchies over the years, but this is by far my favorite way.

          Or maybe two?

          Or threeeeee????  I can’t stop!  This one was made with a jelly roll strip (cut in half at the fold, selvedges removed, then sewn in the same manner as the scrappy one).


          One (or fifteen!) super cute hair scrunchie!

          Head over to my website at Cascade Quilts to enter my giveaway for some of these scrunchies and a mini charm pack so you can make your own.

          cascadequilts.com

          Star Log Cabin and Mini Quilt


          Finished Quilt Size: Approximately 40” x 40”

          Welcome back to the Cabins!

          I had so much fun with the Down on the Farm quilt on the September 26th Bake Shop, that I just had to return with a couple of “minis” for everyone.

          The gorgeous Midwinter Reds fabric line from Minick and Simpson is just perfect for building log cabins, so I am going to continue
          the theme here.

          The table topper size quilt is going to look amazing for my Christmas decorating and the little mini is a show stopper at any time of the year and will be showcased in a prominent spot in my quilting studio.

          Happy quilting!

          – Marlene Biles – Sipiweske Quilts
            


          Ingredients for Star Cabins:
          1 – “Midwinter Reds” layer cake by Minick and Simpson
          First border: 1/4 yard
          Second border: 1/4 yard
          Third border: 1/2 yard
          1/4 yard background fabric for paper-pieced cabin blocks
          1/3 yard centre squares and binding fabric
          1 1/4 yards of backing fabric (ensure that there is at least 42“ of usable width – if not, you will need to purchase extra and piece it together to get the width required.)
          44” x 44” batting

          Ingredients for Mini Log Cabins:
          Scraps from the layer cake
          Two copies of the pattern sheet
          Scraps of fabric for borders
          Frame with a mat opening of 8” x 8”


          Double matting to match your mini log cabin;
          Barn board frame to finish off your masterpiece.

           
          PLEASE READ ALL INSTRUCTIONS BEFORE STARTING THIS PROJECT.
          The blocks shown above are for your reference during the construction process.  If you are using a planned colour placement for your blocks you could cut your strips and label them as to the placement number as shown in the block above on the right.  If you are making your block scrappy, just be sure to follow the light side for your lights and the dark side for your darks.

          Now it’s time to open up that gorgeous layer cake and make a few decisions.  Do a quick flip through all of those fantastic prints and separate the reds into one stack, the creams into one stack, the tans into another stack and a separate stack for the prints that you don’t think will work in your layout.  To get the star effect you will be making the following:

          4 – all cream blocks (avoid prints that have too much red);
          4 – all red blocks (avoid prints that have too much cream or tan in them);
          8 – 1/2 red and 1/2 cream blocks.
          As a color guide see the reference block above.

          Now have a look at your four paper pieced log cabins and decide which prints you want to use for them.  1 1/4” is the widest strips that you need for the cabin and the roof units; a 2 1/4” piece is needed for the window.  If you are using a print that has not been used in the 16 log cabin blocks then there is no concern as to whether you will have enough.  If you are using some prints from the log cabin blocks, then just make sure that you set aside some for your paper pieced cabins.  Or you can make your four paper pieced log cabins before starting the 16 blocks and eliminate the “surprise” factor.

          How to Cut Log Cabin Strips:
          Make a stack of 4 to 6 prints from the 10″ x 10″ squares that you have selected for your log cabin squares (or whatever number you are comfortable cutting through at one time).

          Line up the left hand edges of your stack as close to perfect as possible.  Measure 1 5/8” from the left raw edge and make your first cut.
          Flip the strip around and trim off the raw edge to make a perfect 1 1/2” strip.

          Continue cutting 1 1/2″ strips.
          From the light strips cut 4 – 1 1/2” strips from each print and from the dark prints, cut 5 – 1 1/2” strips – all your strips will be 10” long – do not cut into shorter segments at this stage. If you prefer, cut one strip less of each of the prints and then just go back later in the construction process and cut a few of the prints that you feel you want to have a bit more of.
          Using the yardage that you have chosen for your centre squares, cut 1 – 1 1/2” x 42” strip and sub-cut into 16 – 1 1/2” x 1 1/2” squares.
          Before you start sewing – check your seam allowance.  A perfect 1/4” is preferred, but in all cases ensure that whatever seam allowance you start with you continue through the entire quilt construction process.  To achieve the 7” finished square blocks for this project, I needed to move my needle setting over to the right by a couple of nudges.  Everyone’s machine may sew just a bit different and everyone’s presser foot might be a bit different, so be prepared to maybe have a 7” x 7” finished block, and maybe not.
          How to Sew Log Cabin Blocks:
          Step One:
          Place a centre square and  a light strip right sides together and join with a 1/4” seam, using the machine’s presser foot as a guide.  Now line up your ruler against the straight edge of Print #1, and using your rotary cutter trim away the excess of Print #2 (refer to the block legend shown earlier for reference).  Open squares and press seam allowance away from the centre square.
          NOTE:  Remember that the last strip you added is always on top under the needle.  Sew with the wrong side of the finished work facing you, the new strip will always be underneath so that you can see the seam allowances and guide them away from the centre of the block as you stitch.

          Step Two:
          Lay this unit on top of another light strip – right sides together.  Stitch this seam as shown in the photo.  Ensure that you push the seam allowance up as you sew over it.  Trim off piece #3 evenly with piece #1.  Press seam allowance away from the centre square.
          Step Three:
          Turn the unit so that piece #3 is at the top and lay this section over a dark strip (#4).  Align the raw edges and stitch, ensuring that the previous seam allowance is pushed upwards.  Trim unit evenly with piece #1 and #2.  Press seam allowance away from the centre square.
          Step Four:
          Now lay this partial block on top of another dark strip (#5).  Stitch and trim strip #5 even with the edge of unit #2 and #3.  Open up and press.

          Continue adding and trimming strips in this manner, always turning the block counter-clockwise as you add strips, until you have a block 7 1/2” x 7 1/2” square that looks like the block above.  Assembly line piecing works very well with this type of block if a planned colour placement is used.  As in the samples shown here, the prints are randomly placed which makes it a bit more difficult to use the assembly line method – a modified version does work, but not quite as efficiently.
          Give all of your blocks a final pressing and get them stacked and ready to lay out into a quilt.  Refer to the photo below or play around with different layouts to find one that appeals to you.
          Cutting Strips for Paper Piecing:
          If you have some leftovers from the Log Cabin Blocks (1 1/2”), these can be used for:  House Roof; House Door; and Chimney, or cut 1 1/2” strips from your chosen prints.
          For the House Window cut a 2” strip from remaining 10” x 10“ fabrics – they can all be the same or different – your choice!
          From your background fabric (42” wide) cut two 1 1/2” strips and one 2 1/2” strip.  The 2 1/2″ strip is needed for the left side of the roof unit and the top of the block.  Add a 1 1/2” background strip to each side of the cabin once it is constructed and a 2 1/2” strip to the top of the cabin block. If you need to adjust the log cabin blocks to fit your border when it is completed, the 2 1/2″ strip across the top is where you can add a bit to or subtract a bit from, so you may want to leave this strip off until you finish your border strip set (see instructions below).  Trim it to match your border right before sewing it to either end. 
          Border Construction:
          The borders for this quilt are done in strip sets.
          1. The first step is to measure the four sides of the quilt top, and mark down the most consistent measurement.
          2. From your first border print cut four (4) 1 1/2” strips of your recorded measurement.
          3. From your second border print cut four (4) 2” strips of your recorded measurement.
          4. From your third border print cut four (4) 4” strips of your recorded measurement.
          5. Sew the first and second border strips together, matching at either end.  Press the seam to the darker print.  Repeat for the other three sides of the quilt.
          6. Sew the third border strip to the second border strip, matching at either end.  Press the seam to the darker print.  Repeat for the other three sides of the quilt.
          7. Sew a border strip set to two opposite sides of the quilt top, matching at either end (pin at intervals along the entire length).  Press seam towards the border.
          8. Sew a paper pieced cabin block to either end of the remaining two border strip sets.
          9. Pin this border unit, right sides together and matching seams at borders, sew the final two borders in place to complete the quilt top.
          Final pressing:  Your quilt top is now done and ready for one final pressing before being layered and basted for quilting.
          Binding:  Measure the top, bottom and sides of your quilt and divide this number by 42” (width of fabric) and using the number you get, round up to the nearest whole number.  This is the number of 2 1/4” strips you need to cut for binding strips.  Using a diagonal seam, stitch these strips into a long continuous unit.  Press strip in half with wrong sides together.  Stitch to the right side of the quilt aligning raw edges as you go and mitering corners as you come to them.  Turn edge over to the back side of the quilt and hand stitch in place.
          Log Cabin Mini:
          This tiny quilt is also made using 16 log cabin blocks.  Make two copies of the attached pattern sheet.  Leftovers from the larger quilt can be used to construct this little mini.  If you need to cut strips as well, you can cut these into 1” widths.
          Following your favourite method of paper piecing, construct the 16 log cabin blocks.  If paper piecing is new to you, do some research on-line for some of the different techniques and give each a try to see which method you prefer.
          Some tips that I can give you:
          1.  Reduce your stitch length to a smaller one than you usually use.

          2.  Trim each seam to less than 1/4” so that it fits into the strip width of the block.

          3.  Be sure to always clip your threads – you don’t want to be dealing with those when working with such a tiny project.

          4.  When cutting your blocks apart on the pattern sheet be sure to leave extra paper around the dashed lines – this makes it easier to hang onto and reminds you to make sure that the fabric is wide enough to go past the seam lines on the pattern.

          5.  Pressing as you go is not necessary.  The project is small enough that a quick finger press is all that is required.  If you do use your iron, remember to PRESS the blocks – do not iron them from side to side.  A final press once the blocks are completed is recommended before trimming.

          Trimming and Constructing:
          This is where the extra paper and fabric that you left beyond the cutting lines now becomes a factor. Each block can now be trimmed by cutting directly on the cutting line (dashed lines) and each block will be the exact same size.  This is important when sewing the tiny blocks together – all you should have to do is line up the paper edges of each of the two blocks being sewn together (right sides together), hold them tight together and sew directly on the seam line.  There really isn’t a lot of room on these little blocks for pins, so I find this is a critical step in the construction of the quilt.
          There are a number of ways that you can lay out your little quilt and it is fun to play around with the blocks to see which design you prefer.  If you have a camera take shots of each of the layouts and then see which one you prefer.
          Sew the blocks together into rows.  You can remove the paper from the sewn seams only if you want to remove a bit of bulk before you sew the rows together.  You can also press the seams open to make things lay a little flatter – there is a bit of bulk in a tiny quilt like this!!!
          I took my mini-quilt to a frame shop and chose mats that worked best with the tones in my quilt. They had me add a wide enough border to all four sides of the quilt so that it could be stretched around a backing board (foam core or some other firm surface) that would fit into the frame I had chosen.  Once again a little research on-line can also yield some wonderful ideas for finishing your mini.  The little quilt should measure approximately 8” x 8” when done, so that would be the measurement of the mat opening – you would then be able to choose to have a 10” x 10” frame or a 12” x 12”, with the gorgeous little masterpiece centred and on display.
          Working in miniature is a challenge but well worth the effort.  Have fun!!!
          Star Log Cabins:  Finished Quilt Size: 40” x 40”
          Mini log Cabins:  Finished Quilt Size: 8” x 8”

          Midwinter Cozy Quilt


          Red is the color of toy wagons and rubber balls.  It is the color of roses and fire trucks.  These things are always red in my mind.  Even so, there is room in my mind for wagons, rubber balls, roses, and fire trucks of other colors.  However, when winter rolls around and the days get long and dark I always reach for my red sweater.  Midwinter Reds by Minick and Simpson packs all of the warmth and spirit of my favorite red sweater into a fabric line.  It fills my heart with memories of cold days and warm ginger bread, with visions of hearth and home.  It is a natural for this tiny quilt/toy/table topper.  I hope you home is filled with all of the warmth and joy that midwinter red has to offer.

          Midwinter Cozy

          • Stars and Backgrounds
            • 8, 2 1/2″ Candy Charm Packs + 1, 5″ Charm Pack for a very scrappy look
            • OR 1 layer cake
          • Inner Border & Binding
            • 1/2 yard (I used tone on tone paisley in red SKU#14766-13)
          • Outer Border
            • 1/2 yard (I used red floral on tan, SKU #14761-16)
          • Backing
            • 1 yard (I used red dots on tan, SKU14767-16)

          Cutting Directions:
          • Stars – If you are using a layer cake rather than the charm packs you can cut all of the required pieces from 1, 10″ x 10″ square.
            • cut 12 sets of
              • 8, 2 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ squares (if not taken one each from the candy charm packs) for points.
              • 1, 4 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ square (from matching 5″ charm) for centers.
          • Backgrounds – using either 3, 5″ charms or 1 layer cake square
            • cut 12 sets of
              • 4, 2 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ rectangles for edges.
              • 4, 2 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ squares for corners.
          • Borders
            • Inner
              • cut 4, 1″ x width of fabric (wof) strips
            • Outer
              • cut 4, 3″ x wof strips
          • Binding
            • cut 4, 2 1/2″ x wof strips

          Sewing Directions:
          The directions are written as if you were making one block at a time.  When I want my projects to be more unified (less scrappy) I make them this way.  It is easier to keep all of the same colors together.  If you want a more scrappy project make all of the flying goose units at the same time, randomly selecting squares and rectangles.
          • Flying Goose Units
            • Gather
              • 8, 2 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ squares
              • 4, 2 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ rectangles
            • Draw a diagonal line on the wrong side of each 2 1/2″ square
            • With right sides together align one square atop one rectangle.
            • Sew along the line but just to the outside. (on the side toward the smallest part of the rectangle
            • Iron flap open – pushing the triangle lying over the larger part of the rectangle up and over the seam.
            • At this point you can trim the excess fabric from the back of the patch; however, I leave mine in.  It gives me a little more control over the bias edge that tend to make triangles warp, and it make the points stick out just a little more in the finished product.
            • You now have a rectangle with one corner different.
            • Repeat the process on the opposite side of triangle.
            • Be careful to get the seam going in the right direction.  It should be perpendicular to the seam you already made.
            • Trim unit back to 2 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ rectangle
            • Again, you choose to trim the seam allowances or not.
            • Repeat 3 times for a total of 4 units.
          • Block
            • Gather
              • 4 flying goose units
              • 4, 2 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ background squares
              • 1, 4 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ star square
            • Sew Rows
              • Top and bottom
                • Sew patches together as shown
                • Iron seam allowances towards the background squares
              • Center
                • Sew patches together as shown
          
          
                • Iron seam allowances towards the center
            • Sew rows together to form square.
            • Iron seam allowances away from the center block.  This will require a good deal of steam if you left the extra fabric on the goose patches.
            • Trim final block to 8 1/2″ x 8 1/2″
          • Make 12 blocks
          • The Quilt
            • Gather
              • 12, 8 1/2″ x 8 1/2″ star blocks
              • inner border – 4, 1″ x wof
              • outer border – 4, 3″ x wof
            • Arrange blocks in a 4 x 3 grid to your liking.
            • Sew 3 sets of 4 blocks together to make rows
            • Sew rows together to make center of top.
            • Sew inner border strips on long edges.
            • Iron seam allowances towards the border
            • Sew inner border strips on short edges
            • Irons seam allowances towards the border
            • Repeat border process with outer border.
            • Layer and quilt as desired.


          One super cute little quilt for doll or baby.  This quilt is also sized nicely to fit on a coffee or end table.  Alter the arrangement of blocks to a 2 x 6 grid and create a sweet holiday runner.

           Food for thought –  This block was designed to be used with candy charm sized pieces.  You used them to make the points of the stars in the flying goose units, and the corner background pieces.  You could also use them to make the rest of the block.
          Sew 2 candy charms together to make 1, 2 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ rectangle.  This is the size of the foundation rectangle for the flying goose unit.
          Sew 4 candy charms together to make 1, 4 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ square.  Perfect for the center of these stars!
          Check out the block I made with 24 candy charm squares and the scraps from my inner border.  To do the same you need 12 light squares and 12 dark squares.  Depending on the fabric line (not all lines have the same number of dark and light fabrics in them) you could make 2 blocks per candy charm pack.  OR, go with a regular sized charm pack and you have the makings of 8 blocks.  OR go with a layer cake and you can make 32 blocks.  I think I would love to see that quilt!
          This is a picture collage made on PicMonkey.
            Imagine how cool it would look with 16 different blocks!
          No matter what version of this pattern you use, or what fabric line, I ‘d love to see it.  Please add a picture to the Tops to Treasures Flickr group, or send me your photo.  I would be glad to add it for you.

          Cindy Sharp
          {www.topstotreasures.blogspot.com}

          Down On The Farm Quilt


          Here in Canada we LOVE our red and white and especially love using this colour combo “Down on the Farm.”  When I saw these beautiful reds, tans and cream tones I just knew what type of design to focus on – a good ole’ barn raising and images from my Past, Present, and Future.  I hope everyone has as much fun with this quilt as I did . . . remember to customize it however you like to make it a “one-of-a-kind” quilt that creates memories for you.

          1 – “Midwinter Reds” layer cake by Minick and Simpson
          First and Third borders: 3/4 yard
          Second border: 1/3 yard
          Inserted Flap (Flange) border: 1/4 yard (optional)
          1/2 yard background fabric for paper-pieced blocks
          1/2 yard for centre squares and binding fabric
          1 1/2 yards of backing fabric
          46” x 54” batting

          Scraps of embroidery thread to stitch your hometown name on the elevator


          PLEASE READ ALL INSTRUCTIONS BEFORE STARTING THIS PROJECT.

          The blocks shown above are for your reference during the construction process.  If you are using a planned colour placement for your blocks you could cut your strips and label them as to the placement number as shown in the block above on the right.  If you are making your block scrappy, just be sure to follow the light side for your lights and the dark side for your darks.
          I have designed the pattern so that the upper farm scene can be adjusted to fit your measurements, so please do not stress if your blocks are a slightly different size!
          Now it’s time to open up that lovely layer cake and make a few decisions.
          Do a quick flip through all those gorgeous prints and pull out any of the duplicate ones and set them aside.
          Now have a look at your buildings, fence and tree blocks and decide what prints you want to use where.  Sometimes it doesn’t matter for the smaller pieces like the windows, doors and the roof on the house – scraps left over from making the log cabin blocks will work fine for some of those small pieces.  The elevator, barn, house, and tree use a bit bigger pieces and you want to make sure that you don’t run out of the print that you want to use for those blocks.  So pick out your favourites for these and set them aside . . . they may already be some of the duplicate ones that you’ve set aside and that is just fine. 
          Don’t worry about how many 10” x 10” squares you use – there is enough fabric in your layer cake to cut extra strips if needed.
          How to cut Log Cabin Strips:
          Make a stack of light, medium and dark 10” x 10“ prints – having approximately 4-6 prints in each stack (or whatever number you are comfortable cutting through at one time).
          Line up the left hand edges of your stack as close to perfect as possible.  Measure 1 5/8” from the left raw edge and make your first cut.
          Flip the strip around and trim off the raw edge to make a perfect 1 1/2” strip. 
          Continue cutting 1 1/2“ strips.
          From the light strips cut 4 – 1 1/2” strips from each print and from the dark prints, cut 5 – 1 1/2” strips – all your strips will be 10” long – do not cut into shorter segments at this stage. .  If you prefer cut one strip less of each of the prints and then just go back later in the construction process and cut a few of the prints that you feel you want to have a bit more of.

          Using the yardage that you have chosen for your center squares, cut 1 – 1 1/2” x 42” strip and sub-cut into 16 – 1 1/2” x 1 1/2” squares.
          Before you start sewing – check your seam allowance.  A perfect 1/4” is preferred, but in all cases ensure that whatever seam allowance you start with you continue through the entire quilt construction process.  To achieve the 7” finished square blocks for this project, I needed to move my needle setting over to the right by a couple of nudges.  Everyone’s machine may sew just a bit different and everyone’s presser foot might be a bit different, so be prepared to maybe have a 7” x 7” finished block, and maybe not.
          How to Sew Log Cabin Blocks:

          Step One:
          Place a center square and  a light strip right sides together and join with a 1/4” seam, using the machine’s presser foot as a guide.  Now line up your ruler against the straight edge of Print #1, and using your rotary cutter trim away the excess of Print #2 (refer to the block legend on Page 1 for reference).  Open squares and press seam allowance away from the center square.

          NOTE:  Remember that the last strip you added is always on top under the needle.  Sew with the wrong side of the finished work facing you, the new strip will always be underneath so that you can see the seam allowances and guide them away from the center of the block as you stitch.
          Step Two:
          Lay this unit on top of another light strip – right sides together.  Stitch this seam as shown in the photo.  Ensure that you push the seam allowance up as you sew over it.  Trim off piece #3 evenly with piece #1.  Press seam allowance away from the center square.

          Step Three:
          Turn the unit so that piece #3 is at the top and lay this section over a dark strip (#4).  Align the raw edges and stitch, ensuring that the previous seam allowance is pushed upwards.  Trim unit evenly with piece #1 and #2.  Press seam allowance away from the center square.

          Step Four:
          Now lay this partial block on top of another dark strip (#5).  Stitch and trim strip #5 even with the edge of unit #2 and #3.  Open up and press.


          Continue adding and trimming strips in this manner, always turning the block counter-clockwise as you add strips, until you have a block 7 1/2” x 7 1/2” square that looks like the block above.  Assembly line piecing works very well with this type of block if a planned colour placement is used.  As in the samples shown here, the prints are randomly placed which makes it a bit more difficult to use the assembly line method – a modified version does work, but not quite as efficiently.

          Give all of your blocks a final pressing and get them stacked and ready to lay out into a quilt.  Refer to the photo at the beginning of the blog post or play around with different layouts to find one that appeals to you.

          Cutting Strips for Paper Piecing
          There are many methods for paper piecing – please feel free to use whatever method works best for you and that you are comfortable with.

          Leftovers from the Log Cabin Blocks (1 1/2”) can be used for:  House Roof; House Door; Chimney; Barn Windows; Fence Posts; and Tree Trunk.

          Cut wider strips from remaining 10”x10“ fabrics:
          House Window: 2” strip
          Barn Door: 2 1/2” strip
          Barn Roof: 2” strip
          Barn: 1 1/2” and 2” strips
          Lean-to: 3” strip
          Lean-to Roof: 1”
          Elevator – Light Color: 3 3/4” strip
          Elevator – Dark Color: 2” strip

          Background Strips (all 42“ long) – Cut a variety and then use as needed.  I cut a 5”, 2” and 1” strip – the 5” works best for the backgrounds on the Lean-to, the Fence block and for the angled pieces in the Tree block.  The 1” strips work best for the Fence block and the sides of the House.  If you want a different size for a certain area, just cut it from the 5” strip as needed.

          The tree has a lot of different angles going on and sometimes those can be quite a challenge. The trick is to always use a wide enough strip to allow for coverage of the area that you are wanting to cover.  The other important thing to remember is to always do a bit of a mock-sewing, by either using a couple of pins or by holding the piece of fabric in place along the seam line and flipping it over to make sure that the shape you are wanting to cover is covered.  Sometimes it doesn’t seem to matter how carefully you plan, something still doesn’t work out in the end.  Always keep your seam ripper handy and take comfort in knowing that you’re not the first who has needed to re-work an angle!

          The tree block is the “adjusting block” that I talked about at the beginning.  Once the tree is paper pieced you can add the top background strip (1 1/2”).  Then add 2 1/2” strips of background fabric to each side.  These 2 1/2” strips are wider than you need and will allow you to custom fit your entire barn scene to fit your finished log cabin bottom unit.  Measure your log cabin unit, including seam allowance – mark that number down.  Sew as many of your farm scene blocks together as you can . . . remember they don’t need to be in the order that I have sewn them in – create your own barn scene.  Measure your pieced blocks including only the one set of seam allowances.  Calculate the measurement you need to fill the available space and add 1/2” inch to that measurement.  Trim your tree block to that measurement and sew it into the sequence you have chosen.  Now you can sew the farm scene unit to the log cabin unit to complete your quilt center.
           Adding the First Border
          1.  Measure through the middle row of blocks on the quilt top.
          2.  Cut 2 – 1 1/2” x 42“ strips of this measurement from your first border print.
          3.  Find the center of the quilt top and the center of the top border strip by folding them in half. Mark the halfway point with a pin or fabric marker. With right sides together, pin the center of the border to the center of the top. Pin the ends of the border strip to the ends of the quilt top and then pin every two or three inches, easing in any fullness.
          4.  Using ¼ inch seam, stitch the top borders in place, being careful to ease in any fullness. As you are sewing your borders into place, be careful to keep the seams on your blocks laying in the direction they were pressed in.  Repeat steps 3 and 4 for the bottom border.
          5.  Press the seams.
          6.  Measure the quilt top from top to bottom across the center, including the borders just sewn on.  Repeat steps 3 to 5.
          Note:  For longer borders:
          If your measurement is longer than one length of the 42” strip, the borders will need to be pieced – just straight seam border strips together to make a longer length and then cut to the length needed.

          Adding the Second Border:
          Repeat steps 1 to 6 for the 2 1/2” second border.

          Preparing and Applying the Flap (Flange) Border – (Optional)
          1.  Using 5  1¼” inner border strips, straight seam them together end-to-end to create one long strip.
          2. Press the entire strip in half, wrong sides together.
          3.  Measure the quilt top from top to bottom and side to side across the center, including the borders just sewn on and cut four lengths of the flap border strip to those measurements.
          4.  Using a 1/8” seam allowance, and with the right side of the quilt facing you, start stitching the strip to the first border, matching centers and ends as per step 3 above.
          5.  Repeat for the other side and top and bottom of the quilt.

          Adding the Third Border:
          Repeat steps 1 to 6 for adding the first border using the 3 1/2“ third border print strips.

          Embroider the name of your hometown on the front of the elevator and any other special touches that you want to make to your quilt.  The quilt top is now complete and ready for one final pressing before being layered and basted for quilting.  This quilt was quilted by Terry Whitman in Estevan, Saskatchewan and she made swirly wind stitching around the buildings and diagonal quilting across the body of the quilt.  The border has been quilted with a diamond/zig zag pattern.  Terry added sunflowers and other flowers on top of the barn and cabin, as well as a wheat sheaf on the elevator.

          Binding:  Measure the top, bottom and sides of your quilt and divide this number by 42” (width of fabric) and using the number you get, round up to the nearest whole number.  This is the number of 2 1/4” strips you need to cut for binding strips.  Using a diagonal seam, stitch these strips into a long continuous unit.  Press strip in half with wrong sides together.  Stitch to the right side of the quilt aligning raw edges as you go and mitering corners as you come to them.  Turn edge over to the back side of the quilt and hand stitch in place.  Make a log cabin label and attach with pride!

          I hope you enjoyed your time “Down on the Farm” with me.

          Finished Quilt: 40″ x 48″

          Marlene Biles
          {www.sipiweskequilts.blogspot.com}

          Midwest Crossings Quilt

          MIdwest Crossings 7


          I can not think of any crisper colors that go together well such as indigo and white. It is the color combination that actually lasts the whole year round. Its fresh as a cold crisp winter’s day, rain fall in the spring, a sailing excursion in the summer and a new pair of blue jeans you get every fall. If there ever was a great collection that exerts the color of indigo it would be Indigo Crossing by Minick & Simpson!

          The quilt I have created for the Moda Bake Shop is called Midwest Crossings. The Midwest Crossing quilt consist of sixteen traditional Cats & Mouse quilt blocks that alternate the indigo hues of Ingigo Crossings to give the quilt a chain effect. Naming this quilt “Midwest Crossing” was not only for it’s “X” like stars but because here in America you have to cross through the highways and biways of the Midwest to get from one coast line to the other, and the Midwest is the heart of America!  – J.L. Overstreet

          Midwest Crossing is a 76″ x 76″ quilt
          Indigo Way 2


          (1) Fat Quarter Bundle – Indigo Crossings AB 40 skus 14750AB Moda Precuts
          (3) yards of Bella White #9900-98
          (3 1/2) yards of Indigo Crossings Indigo #14757-13


          Please read all instruction prior to starting this project.
          *All seam will be 1/4″ unless stated other wise.
          Please do use a heavy starch on all fabrics since these blocks deal with a bias cut!

          Cutting Directions:

          From the Fat Quarters

          First gather all the blue fat quarters from the bundle.
          Take each blue fat quarter and cut:
           (2) strips into 4 1/2″x wof then cut the strips down to (5) 4 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ squares. You will need 80 total squares.
           (3) strips into 2 1/2″ x wof then cut strip down to (16) 2 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ squares. You will need 256 total squares.

          Gather 16 various cream fat quarters and cut:

          (1) 4 1/2″ x wof then cut the strip into (4) 2 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ rectangles. You need 64 rectangles.

          From the cream fat quarters you can pull 16 separate colorways for more of variety but you do not have to. You can easily use three fat quarters for the entire quilt if you like. In a perfect world you can get four strips x wof per fat quarter. Ending with (28) 2 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ rectangles per fat quarter.

          From the white Bella Solids Yardage cut:

          (8) 9″ x wof strips, then cut strips down to (4) 9″ x 9″ squares per strip. You will need 64 total squares. Lastly cut each square once diagonally
          (4) 4 1/2″ x wof strips, then cut strips down to (16) 2 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ rectangles per strip. You will need 64 total rectangles.
          (4) 4″ x wof strips, then cut strips down to (10) 4″ x 4″ squares per strip. You will need 32 total squares. Lastly cut each square once diagonally.

          From the Indigo Crossings Indigo #14757-13 cut:

          (2 1/2) cut yards from the 3 1/2 yards. Save the remaining one yard for your binding. The 2 1/2 yards will be used for your border. You will need (4) strips of  6″ x lof, two total cuts in all. Since I chose a one directional print for the border, I simply made the print look like it is going around the quilt. This way when the quilt is laid out there is no wrong direction to the quilt.

          Block Assembly:

          The block used for this quilt is call the Cat & Mouse block. Using alternating blues give this quilt an affect of chasing and chaining.

          For this quilt it is easier to assemble the blocks by color hues, dark blues with dark blues and light blues match up with the light blues. Mix and match ex: dark blue printed 4 1/2′ x 4 1/2″ squares with dark blue printed 2 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ squares. Repeat the same process for the light and medium blue hues. You will have eight sets of both blues hues with a total of sixteen blocks in all. Just a note: there is a medium blue hue in this fabric line. I simply added them to the light blues because there is not enough light blue fabric in this collection to make up the eight blocks needed for the light blues for this quilt.

          Each block will need:
          (5) 4 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ squares
          (16) 2 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ squares
          (4) 2 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ white rectangles
          (4) 2 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ cream rectangles
          (2) 4″ x 4″ squares mark and cut on a diagonal  (I know I have angle written in the photo)
          (2) 9″ x 9″ squares mark and cut on a diagonal. (Same as above, I know, I know!)
          This example is for one block only.
          Picture 1772 1

          Flying geese Assembly

          • Gather the 2 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ squares, a ruler and a marking/writing utensil of your choice.
          • Align the ruler on the square on the wrong side of the fabric on an diagonal.
          • Make your mark and repeat the the same process over for the remaining (15) 2 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ squares.

          Ohio Crossings 1

          •  Next take (1) 2 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ rectangle, and align a 2 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ square right sides together. Preferably starting the alignment on the left side. 
          • Once the two are aligned then stitch on a diagonal. Start the stitch from the bottom left to center top of the rectangle.  Repeat the same process for the remaining 2 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ rectangle and 2 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ squares. Chain piecing works great for this process.

          Ohio Crossings 3

          • Grab a ruler and a cutting utensil of choice and cut a 1/4″ above the seam/stitch line.
          • Remove excess fabric.

          Ohio Crossings 2

          • Press open the left wing on all your half winged geese.
          • Take another 2 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ square and align it on the right side or opposite side of the 2 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ half winged geese. Again stitch right sides together.
          • Then start stitching from the bottom right of the rectangle to the center on a diagonal.  

          Ohio Crossings 4

          • Again bring back the ruler and cutting utensil of choice, and cut  1/4″ above the seam/stitch line.
          • Remove excess fabric.
          • Press open the right wing of the flying geese.
          • Repeat the process for the remaining half winged geese.

          Ohio Crossings 5

          • Congratulations you have finished with creating a flying goose.
          • You will need (8) flying geese in all. (4) with a white center and (4) with a cream center.

          Picture 1782

          From Flying Geese to the Hour Glass and to the start of the Star/Cat & Mouse Block.
          Again this example is still for one block

          • With the (4) white flying geese and the (4) cream flying geese, align each colorway, right sides together at the points of the geese.
          • Stitch across the top right sides together of points of the flying geese, and then press the seams. This will give you (4) hourglass blocks.
          • Next grab the (5) 4 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ squares and the (4) hourglass blocks.
          • Take (1) of the 4 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ squares and (1) of the hour glass blocks and stitch with the square right sides together to the white side of the hour glass block (photo below examples it wrong). Repeat this process one more time to get two separate hour glass square combinations. 
          • Lastly grab the remaining (3) 4 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ squares and the (2) remaining hour glass blocks.
          • Start with a square, then stitch the square to the white side of the first hour glass block right sides together.
          • Then stitch the next square to the cream side of the hour glass block right sides together.
          • Now add the remaining hour glass block by stitching it cream side to the opposite side the the second square right sides together. 
          • Lastly stitch on the last remaining square right sides together to the white side of the hour glass block. *see photo below and yes, that example is correct! This combination will be a long strip. 
          • Press all seams.

          Ohio Crossings 6

          Piecing the star/Cats & Mouse block together.

          • This process  you will need the single hour glass and square combination and (1) 9″ x 9″ square that has all ready been cut on a diagonal, giving you two right triangles.
          •  Stitch the hour glass block combination and the (1) of the right triangles right sides together starting from the bottom of hour glass side. Then stitch the other right triangle to the other side of the hour glass combination right sides together starting from the bottom of the hour glass side again. Repeat this process for the other hour glass right triangle combination.
          • Press seams.
          • Next align and pin the seams of the longer strip of the hour glass combination to one of the hour glass right triangle combination. Press seams and repeat the process for the other side.

          Ohio Crossings 7

          • Once all seams are pressed cut off all dog ears on all four sides of the block.

          Ohio Crossings 8

          • Finally grab the (2) 4″ x 4″ squares that are cut on a diagonal.
          • Take each right triangle of the 4″ x 4″ squares and center them evenly to the open edges of the nearly finished Cats & Mouse block. 
          • Pin them, stitch, and then press open.
          • Trim additional dog ears if needed.

          Ohio Crossings 9

          • Your finished product will be one finished block measuring 17 1/2″ x 17 1/2″

          Picture 1793

          • If there is a need to trim all of your blocks evenly don’t worry I designed these blocks so that you have a 1/4″ lead way all around to trim them down if necessary. This will give you a 17″ x 17″ square block.
          • Repeat the entire process for the remaining 15 blocks to make up this quilt.  

          Assembling the quilt

          • When all 16 blocks are finished, place them in alternating blue hues to your liking in four to a row then stitch each row.
          • Press each row seams and then start stitching each of the rows together.
          • Make the final presses on the rows and then start stitching the 6′ x lof border to the sides of the quilt top.
          • Once the quilt top is complete, layer, baste and quilt to your liking,
          • Then add the binding.

           76″ x 76″ quilt

          Midwest Crossings 8 
          Thank you for stopping by the Bake Shop today!

          Jennifer Overstreet
          {www.ghquilting.com}