Sew Busy! Organizer


Hello!  I’m Polly Monica from Aunt Polly’s Porch!  I’m so happy to be posting here today at the always awesome Moda Bake Shop!  I fell sewwww in LOVE with Moda’s Sewing Box collection and knew it would make some fun things for organizing any sewing room!  I hope you think so, too!  Let’s get busy making these eight sewing projects which include a sewing machine cover, a sewing machine mat, a versatile sewing caddy for your ironing board or armchair, a tub cover, a tie on pin cushion, a chatelaine, a square pin cushion and needle book.


1 Sewing Box charm pack

Sewing Box Charm Pack by Gina Martin for Moda
 
½ yard coordinating print # 1 (notions print white)

FABRIC SEWING BOX Sewing Notions Main Print Moda
 
½ yard coordinating print # 2 (tape measure multi)

Sewing Box - Gina Martin - Moda
 
½ yard coordinating fabric #3 (pins lime)

Sewing Box - Gina Martin - Moda
 
1 yard coordinating print #4 (buttons blue)

Sewing Box, Moda Fabric, Gina Martin, Buttons, 1/2 Yard
 
1.5 yards fusible fleece
 

3.5 yards Jumbo rick rack
Assorted colors and sizes of buttons
 

ABBREVIATIONS and NOTES-
All seam allowances are ¼” unless directed differently.
RST = right sides together
RSO = right sides out
WOF = width of fabric (selvage to selvage)
 
Sewing Machine Cover Instruction
 
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My sewing machine sits down in a Horne sewing table and it’s measurements are- 16” from right to left, 8 ½” from top of machine to tabletop, and 7 ½” deep looking at the machine from the side. (If your machine sits on top of a table, the height will be taller than mine!) You will need to measure your machine and adjust the measurements as necessary.
Take charm pack and cut all pieces in half, giving you two stacks of 42 pieces – 2 ½” by 5” rectangles.

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Set one stack aside, now cut the other stack in half, giving you two stacks of 42 pieces – 2 ½” by 2 ½” squares.

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Set one stack aside, take remaining stack of 2 ½” squares and select 16 for each side of the cover.
Lay them out in two rows of eight squares each (16 for each side).
From the leftover squares, select 4 for a four patch that will be made into a square pin cushion
And select 5 squares to be sewn into a row for a long skinny pin cushion.

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Sew the two rows of squares for one side together- press seams in one direction on the first row and in the opposite direction for the second row so that the seams will nestle together when joined. The resulting long seam can be pressed to one side or open.

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For the center panel on the cover, look at your fabric # 1. If the printed design is directional, like mine was, and you want it to be right side up on both sides of the cover, then you will cut two pieces that are 8 ¾” by 16 ½”. With RST, with the top of the design on BOTH pieces at the top, sew that 16 ½” long seam.

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Now your design should be right side up on both sides of that center seam. If your print is NOT directional then you need no center seam and can cut one piece 17” by 16 ½”.
Sew one pieced set on each 16 ½” end. Press those seams toward the center panel.
 
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Cut a piece of fusible fleece and your fabric # 2 for the batting / backing 18 ½” by 27”. Fuse the fleece onto the wrong side of either front or backing. With RSO, pin the sandwich and quilt as desired. I just did an all-over meander design.

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If you wish to add rick rack or other trim, do it now! Some folks just stitch down the center of rick rack, which is fine with the narrow ones, but for the jumbo size, I like to sew close to the edge, down each side. Then trim off excess batting/backing.

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For the ties, cut one 2 ½” by WOF strip of your fabric #3. Press it in half lengthwise.

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Then open it up and fold the two long raw edges into the center fold and press again.

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Topstitch closely down each long edge.

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Trim off selvage ends, cut it into 4 equal pieces. Lay the cover over your machine and decide where you want the ties to go

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and baste them onto the backing side with the raw end edge even with the side of the cover.

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For the binding, measure the perimeter of your cover and add 8”. Bind the edges your way! Everybody has their own way of binding . I cut my strips 2 ½” by WOF. I join the strips with a diagonal seam, press in half lengthwise, and sew onto the front of the quilt with a SCANT 3/8” seam allowance, flip binding over the seam to the back and hand sew it down. But, the binding can be done your own way!

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If you wish to add a handle at the top of the cover, cut two 2 ¾ ” by 7 ¼”pieces of your fabric #2. Cut one piece of fusible fleece 2 ¾” by 7 ¼”, and fuse onto the wrong side of one fabric piece. If you wish to add rick rack or trim on the handle, sew it onto that piece now.

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I wanted my handle to be a bit more narrow at the ends, so I folded the pieces in half and cut off the corners- see pix below.

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With RST, sew a ¼” seam all around the handle edges but leave an opening at least 2” to turn it through!
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Turn the handle RSO through that opening and hand sew the opening closed. Topstitch 3/8” inch from all edges.
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Measure the cover to find the center and mark it with a pin. Center the handle over that center, but build in a gap!

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Sew through all layers, attaching the handle to the cover at each end.

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I LOVE adding buttons to projects and especially stacking different sized buttons!!

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Add them now wherever you want!! You could even add them down the middle of the rick rack, too!!
All done! Now stand back and admire your creation!!

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Small Square and Tie-On Pin Cushions
 
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Remember that fourpatch and row of five squares you selected and set aside back when you were picking out the squares for your cover front and back?

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If you didn’t sew them together, do it now! Then lay them RST on top of a scrap of your fabric #1 which will be your backing, and cut around them.

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Sew around all sides of the fourpatch, leaving a small opening on one side to turn it through.
Clip the seam allowance diagonally across the corners, but not too close!
This will reduce the bulk there and make those corner points look perfect!

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Turn it RSO, fill it with your choice of polyfil or crushed walnut filler. I like the latter for pin cushions!!

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I get it at the local pet shop- it’s cheap and is actually made for the bottom of small pet cages.
I save my twill tape ties from all Moda jelly rolls and bundles, so I cut my ties for the Tie-On pin cushion from one of those ties. If you don’t have any, you can make ties like the ones you made for the cover from fabric scraps or use ribbon you have in your stash. To determine how long to cut your ties, measure your machine as shown below.

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Add 6” to that measurement. My machine measured 24” + 6” = 30”. So I cut a piece of the Moda twill tape 30” then cut that in half. Insert one end of each tie between the long skinny 5 patch and its backing.

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Then sew all around the edges, but remember to leave a small opening to turn it through.

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Turn it RSO through that opening, pulling out the ties, too. Fill both pin cushions al full as you like. On the skinny one, first fill it only partially up to the second seam line. Stitch through all layers at that seam between the second and third square to facilitate it fitting snugly around the corner on your machine, then fill it the rest of the way.

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Sew the openings closed with tiny stitches.

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Add stacked buttons in the center of the four patch pin cushion and at the sewn down seam on the tie-on pin cushion.

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Voila!! Done!! Yaaaay!!

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Tie the Skinny pin cushion onto your machine!! Add pins!

 
Sewing Machine Mat
 
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Cut a 16 ½” by 16 ½” piece of your fabric #4. Grab your stack of 2 ½” by 5” charm pack pieces, and select 8 pieces. Sew them together along the 5” sides. Press the seams open. Now cut this strip in half lengthwise giving you two strips that are 2 ½” by 16 ½”.

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Sew one strip on each side of the fabric square you cut above.

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Select 10 more strips, sew them together as described above, press seams open and cut in half. Sew one of the strips across the back of the piece. Set the other strip aside for now.

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Now, select 10 more strips for the tall pocket layer, sew them together as above, press seams open, then lay that piece on top of your fabric # 4, and cut a lining strip that exact same size. With RST, sew down one long side. Turn RSO, press and top stitch 3/8” from seam edge.

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Lay this pocket strip across the bottom of the mat with raw edges even all around and pin, then baste these raw edges together.

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Now, stitch through all layers wherever you want to create individual pockets. Make sure to backstitch at the top edge of each pocket seam.

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I made all my pockets the same size by stitching through all layers on every other seam line.

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Next, take the half sized strip you set aside above that has 10 squares and cut out a lining for it from your fabric #4, exactly as you did it above. With RST, sew across the top edge, turn it RSO, press and top stitch it 3/8” from edge.

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Lay it over the tall pocket strip on the lower edge of the mat, creating a second row of smaller pockets.
Baste the raw edges together on sides and bottom. Then sew through all layers again at seams to create the pockets.

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In the photo above, the orange pins show where the tall pockets were stitched and the purple pins show where I chose to sew my smaller pockets. You can sew yours wherever you want!
Use this top to cut a piece of fusible fleece the same size. Iron it onto the wrong side of the finished top. Cut the backing from your fabric #4 just a bit bigger all around than the top. Pin the sandwich and quilt as desired, but don’t quilt through the pockets!!

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If you want to add rickrack or trim, sew it on now!!
Trim the edges even and bind as desired using your fabric #3!

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Hand sew the binding to the back of the mat! Taadaa!!
Done!! YAY!! Now set your machine on it and fill up those awesome pockets!!

 
Versatile Caddy
 
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Believe it or not, you still have some leftover 2 ½ strips from your charm pack, and you have scraps from your yardage we’ve been using, which you can cut into a few more 2 ½” by 5” strips if you want more variety!
Select 3 strips for pockets on one end of the caddy and 4 strips for the thread catcher on the other end of the caddy. Sew them together, cut a piece of fusible fleece for the four strip set, and fuse it on the back. Lay them both on your fabric #4, and cut a matching lining piece for each.

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With RST, sew one long side together on both, turn both RSO, press seams and topstitch 3/8” from seam edge. On the four strip piece with the fleece inside, quilt it as desired.

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Set both aside for the moment!
Cut 2 pieces 6 ½” by 18” from fabric # 4, and one piece the same size from fusible fleece.

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Fuse the fleece on the wrong side of one piece. Layer RSO, then quilt as desired, creating the caddy base.

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Align the three strip piece at one end and baste the raw edges on all three sides.

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Then stitch through all layers on the 2 seam lines to create 3 pockets. Backstitch at the top of each pocket seam.

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Align then baste the SIDES of the four strip set at the other end of the caddy base. Then pin the center bottom of the four strip piece to the center of the bottom of the caddy base and then make two small pleats as you pin the rest of the bottom edge of the four strip piece to fit the base.

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Then baste across the bottom edge.

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If you wish to add rickrack or trim, add it now!

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Trim edges even and bind with fabric #3. Set aside.
Select 6 leftover 2 ½” by 5” strips for the caddy pin cushion.
Cut them in half creating 12 squares 2 ½” by 2 ½”.

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Arrange them in two groups of 6 and sew each group together, leaving a small opening in the center seam of one group to use to turn it through later.

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Place the two pieces RST, and using a ruler and pen, draw a line 1” in from each corner point and trim those corners off.

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Now, sew all around the edges. Turn it RSO through the opening in the bottom seam.

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Fill the pin cushion with polyfil or crushed walnuts and handstitch the opening closed.

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I cut an 8” piece of rickrack and hand stitched/gathered one long edge and drew the thread up to create a ruffled flower.

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I hand stitched it to the center of the pin cushion and added some stacked buttons, as well.

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You can embellish your pin cushion as desired! Center the pin cushion in the middle of the caddy and hand stitch it through the back side to the caddy. YESSSSSSSS! All done!!

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Now you can use it on the end of your ironing board and on an armchair in front of the TV!!

 
Tub Cover
 
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I wanted a tub to sit on my sewing table for sewing tools and materials. I had a large plastic 16 ounce Cool Whip tub container that was the right size! The circumference was 18” and the height was 5”.

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Using the stack of leftover 2 ½” by 2 ½” square charm pack pieces, select 20 pieces and arrange and sew them together in two rows of ten squares.

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If you want to add rickrack or trim, do it now!! I added rickrack down the center seam line.
Cut and fuse a matching piece of fleece to the back of it, then quilt it as desired. I grid-quilted it.

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Cut a matching piece of fabric #4 for the lining, but make one end about an inch longer. Also, just a note here that for backings and lining and even batting/fleece, you can piece smaller scraps together when needed. I save small pieces of batting and connect them with fusible batting tape.

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You will see this tape on the back of this tub cover!

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Another tip is to trim off corners of seam allowance at points, as shown in photo below, to make them turn RSO better.

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Sew two long sides and one short end seams- leaving open the short end with the longer lining piece.
Turn the cover RSO, topstitch 3/8” from the edges and fold up the longer lining end to enclose the raw edges and stitch it closed.

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Pin the cover TIGHTLY around the tub, then slide it off. Sew it closed on the topstitch line of the finished end. I added a stack of buttons for embellishment, then slid it back onto the tub.

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Another little project complete!! Yahoo!!

 
Sewing Chatelaine
 
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Line up 18 to 22 of your leftover 2 ½” squares in a long row. (Don’t forget you have some yardage scraps you can cut into 2 ½” squares to supplement your leftovers and provide a bit more variety.)

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Sew them together, press the seams open then press it in half lengthwise

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and use the same technique you used above to create the sewing machine cover ties to make a long topstitched piece.

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Fold in one short raw edged end as you topstitch it, and slip in a 2” loop created from a bit of stash ribbon or thinner rick rack as I did.

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Knot the other raw edged end.

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Set aside for now. Select a green 2 ½” square, fold it in half then in half again and cut into a petal shape using pinking shears if you have them,

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if not, just use regular scissors. Cut carefully from between two petals just to the center of the piece. Set aside for the moment.

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Select 8 more 2 ½” squares and sew them into four patches. Lay them RST, and trim off the bottom corners creating a triangular shape with the narrow end at the bottom. This will become your strawberry shaped pin cushion. Sew all around leaving the top open. Using needle and doubled thread, sew a gathering stitch around the open top edge.

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Turn RSO, and stuff with polyfil. Push the knotted end of the finished strip down into the polyfil and draw up the thread- gathering the raw edge tightly inside around the strip. Secure it with stitches and a secure hidden knot.

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Wrap the leaf piece around the top of the strawberry and hand stitch it there.

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Add some pins and needles, if desired!!

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Sew on a small button a few inches in from the loop at the other end, so you can secure your small scissors there!! Well done! Another part of the set is complete!! You can wear your chatelaine around your neck while doing hand sewing in your favorite chair in front of the TV and never lose your scissors between the cushions again!!
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Needlebook
 
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After all this, I still had a few leftover 2 ½” by 5” strips, and I cut two more from yardage scraps.
Sew the four strips together. Cut and fuse a matching piece of fleece to the wrong side. Quilt as desired. Add trim or rickrack if you desire. Cut a 4” piece of stash ribbon or thin rickrack, fold into a loop and baste on the center of the back.

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Cut a matching piece of fabric #4, or other yardage scrap, for the lining. With RST, sew around the edges leaving a small opening for turning.

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Turn it RSO, hand sew the opening closed then topstitch around all edges.

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Cut three 4” by 6 ¾” pieces of scrap batting .
Draw a line down the center with a heat erasable pen.

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Line up this drawn line with the center seam of the cover.

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Carefully flip it over and sew down the center seam from the cover side and through all thicknesses.

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Erase the drawn line on the batting with a hot iron. Fold the book on that center seam line.
Add a button or two on the front allowing it to be secured with the loop from the back!

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Add some needles inside and that’s it! You have completed the set of eight projects in this pattern collection!!

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Pat yourself on the back and enjoy using your new sewing room creations!!

 

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Eight sewing room essentials including a Sewing machine cover, a square pin cushion, a tie on pin cushion, a versatile caddy, a sewing machine mat, a tub cover, a chatelaine, and a needle book!
 
Thanks ever so much for trying out these projects! You may have spotted my sweet Westie – Yogi, in some of the photos!

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Come visit us soon at my blog- www.auntpollysporch.blogspot.com!!

We’d love to have you come and visit!!
Polly Monica
{www.auntpollysporch.blogspot.com}

Tidy Linens Bag



Hi! Lisa Calle of Vintage Modern Quilts here today with a very easy project that will help you get a jump in your spring cleaning. A couple of years ago I bought a set of sheets that came with a handy little storage bag and I thought it was a great idea. The only problem? There was no way I’d ever be able to fold those sheets up as small and tidy as they were straight out of the package and they never fit into the bag again. So what’s a girl with a sewing machine and tons of fabric to do? Make my own cuter linens storage bag!

The hardest part of this project is folding that fitted sheet. I made mine for queen size sheets but it will fit king or full, as well. You may want to decrease measurements all over by 1″ to 2″ for twin sheets.

 
2 fat quarters (I used a pair of gray prints from V and Co.’s Color Me Happy line)
8″- 11″ of Velcro
Marking pen


Hand sewing needle and embroidery thread


Cut each of your fat quarters into a 14″ x 15″ rectangle. If you are using a directional print, the 15″ measurement is your length. From the remaining pieces of each fat quarter, cut a 6″ x 8″ rectangle. Set these smaller rectangles aside.

Sew a 1/4″ hem along the top of each large rectangle (or use a serger, if you have one).  Trim a 2½” square from the bottom left and right corners of each rectangle.

Place rectangles right sides together and sew a  ¼” seam along the sides and the bottom, leaving the top and the corners open. Be sure to back stitch at each edge. Press seams.


Box the corners of your bag to create depth. To do this, pinch the fabric together so that the seams line up as pictured.

Sew ¼” seam along each boxed corner, back stitching at the beginning and end of your seam.

To create the fold-over flap of your bag, join the small (6″ x 8″) rectangles together along the long side. Press the seam to one side. Hem all sides of the resulting rectangle.

Determine which side of the bag will be the front. Find the center of the back of the bag and match up with the center of the flap, right sides together. Sew a ¼” seam to join these sections.

Pin one strip of the Velcro along the inside of the bag flap, close to the edge. Sew ⅛” around the Velcro to attach it to the bag. Put your folded sheets in the bag and close the flap firmly, marking where the edge meets (use a removable marking pen). Remove the sheets from the bag and pin the other piece of Velcro just a hair above your mark, again sewing a ⅛” around the Velcro to attach it to the bag.

That’s it! You are done. But if you want to take this project up another notch, use embroidery floss to add some important info to the bag. Are these sheets for the guest room? Your child’s room? Or maybe just add the size.


1 tidy linens bag

Lisa Calle
{vintagemodernquilts.com}

Biscornu Sachets


It’s Casey again, from Casey York Design and the Studiolo blog! I’m so happy to be sharing this easy project on the Moda Bake Shop just in time for the holidays!

I love the idea of making handmade gifts for the holidays, but somehow I never start planning them until the beginning of December (i.e. too late). This year I finally came up with something that I can make quickly and easily enough so that I can produce a bunch for all of the people on my list: Biscornu sachets.

Biscornu are a relatively recently developed needlework form, in which two squares are sewn together with one on point to create a three dimensional shape that looks more complicated than it really is. I love how the interlocking points create visual interest in these little cushions. Because they are constructed from squares of fabric, biscornu are an ideal use for precuts such as charm squares.

I’m not the first to translate the biscornu form for use with quilting fabrics, but most of the tutorials out there are for making pin cushions. This is easy to do by firmly stuffing the sewn biscornu. I discovered that another way to use this form was to make them into scented sachets by  filling them loosely with lavender or other scented materials. If you use a sewing machine, they are so quick to sew up that you can make a set of three in under an hour. Pop a few in a stocking or wrap up a stack to give as quick hand made gifts this year!

For one biscornu satchet you will need:

  • (2) 5″ charm squares of coordinating fabrics (I like to go through an entire charm pack and match up my squares in advance so I get a good mix of colors and prints throughout the batch of biscornu; a Moda charm pack will yield 21 biscornu, or 7 sets of three)
  • matching sewing thread
  • 3/4 cup small polypropelene stuffing beads (available at major craft retailers)
  • 1/4 cup dried lavender (I got mine on Amazon) or other fragrant dried material
  • hand sewing needle
  • Perle cotton or embroidery floss to coordinate with fabrics
Stuffing beads are not shown

1. fold each square in half lengthwise and widthwise and finger press at the edges to mark the half-way point on each edge

2. With right sides together, place one square on top of the other so that the top square’s side edge is positioned 1/4″ to the left of the half-way mark on the top edge of the lower square. Make sure the parallel raw edges are aligned (they are not aligned in the photo to make it easier to see how to line up the halfway marks and corners).

3. Using a 1/4″ seam allowance, begin stitching at the half-way point of the lower square, moving towards the corner. Stop 1/4″ before you reach the corner of the lower square.

4. Here comes the tricky part. You need to pivot your lower square while keeping the upper square in position, so that the remaining unsewn edge of the top square lines up with the perpendicular edge of the lower square. It helps to think of yourself as holding the top square in position and only pivoting the lower square.

This is how the squares will look after the first pivot

5. When you have lined up your squares, lower your presser foot and continue stitching until you are 1/4″ away from the edge of the top square.

6. Now do step 4 in reverse. Holding the lower square in place, pivot the top square so that the edges of the two squares line up. Lower the presser foot and continue stitching until you are 1/4″ from the edge of the lower square.

7. Repeat steps 3-6 until you have traveled all the way around the squares–you will pivot six times. Leave one length (1/2 of the width of the squares) unsewn for turning and stuffing.

8. Turn the biscornu inside out, using your finger to gently poke out the corners.

9. Fill with 3/4 cup of stuffing beads and 1/4 cup of lavender. It is easiest to fill the sachets by rolling a sheet of paper into a cone and pouring the beads and lavender through this. (I have also seen instructions for filling sachets with rice or flax seed, but I prefer stuffing beads because they won’t attract pests.)

9. Finger press the unsewn edges under 1/4.” Slip stitch the opening closed by hand.

10. Using the embroidery floss or perle cotton, make a couple of tacking stitches in the center of the biscornu to pull the top and bottom layers together.

That’s it–you’ve created a lovely and useful sachet. Although these instructions seem complex written out, you’ll get the hang of stitching these on the machine very quickly and you’ll be able to churn out a charm pack’s worth in no time. (If you make some, consider adding photos to my flickr group! I’d love to see what you make!)


1 biscornu sachet. 1 charm pack will yield 21 sachets.

Casey York
{www.studioloblog.wordpress.com}

Mason Jar Tea Cozy

Mason Jar Tea Cozy


I can never get enough tea in the winter, and love to use quart-sized mason jars to fuel my addiction.  These jars are designed for canning, so adding boiling water is perfectly safe! This tea cozy insulates the jar (and protects your hands!) nicely, and it is also great in the summer for keeping your drink cold and preventing your glass from sweating.

Extra bonus – screw the lid on for a handy, spill-proof travel mug. Double-extra bonus – it’s perfect to make with scraps if you don’t have Charm squares handy!

These make a great holiday gift, especially paired with a box of your favorite tea! I’ve got a few more simple holiday gift ideas coming up soon at my blog at WaterPenny.net.

8 Charm squares – or an equivalent measure of scraps
Two pieces of batting measuring 14″ x 6″ and 5” square.

Extra fabric for optional accents
Button

Assemble the sides – finished sides should measure 13×5. Gather your fabric and batting:
    Mason Jar Tea Cozy Tutorial by WaterPenny for Modabakeshop.com

  • Sew together three charms and trim down to 13×5 inches. 

Optional: OR, you can piece the fabric as desired, as long as the end product is 13×5. If adding applique or other fabric design, do so at this stage.

  • Layer outside fabric with quilt batting and sew layers together, quilting as desired. I did a quick wonky checkmark pattern, but this is a great place to try something new. (Note: You can pin before sewing, but I find ironing the layers together makes them hold quite nicely in a project this small.)
  • Trim off any extra batting.
Mason Jar Tea Cozy Tutorial by WaterPenny for Modabakeshop.com

  • Sew the short ends of the outside fabric (right sides together) to form a loop. Use a generous quarter inch seam (as opposed to a scant quarter inch).
  •  Repeat with the inside fabric to create a 13×5 piece of fabric sewn with the ends sewn together to form a loop (right sides together).
Mason Jar Tea Cozy Tutorial by WaterPenny for Modabakeshop.com

Assemble the bottom:
  • Cut out two 4″ circles from charms and one circle from your batting. I trace a four inch embroidery hoop for this step.
Mason Jar Tea Cozy Tutorial by WaterPenny for Modabakeshop.com

  • Fold circles in half twice and iron to create folded lines as shown below (top right) – with the crease lines marking four equal quarters.
  • Layer your outside bottom circle with the batting as shown below (bottom right).
  • Now take the side pieces from the previous step, and fold these in half twice; iron to create four fold lines – marking four equal quarters.
Mason Jar Tea Cozy Tutorial by WaterPenny for Modabakeshop.com

  • Next, line up your four fold lines on your bottom circle and your side piece (right sides together). Pin where fold lines meet.
Mason Jar Tea Cozy Tutorial by WaterPenny for Modabakeshop.com 
  • After I have my fold lines pinned together, I add a lot more pins! 

Note: In the outside layer, which has a layer of batting in the bottom circle, take care when pinning to make sure you are catching both the fabric layers and the batting layer together.

    Mason Jar Tea Cozy Tutorial by WaterPenny for Modabakeshop.com

    • Everything pinned? Sew the bottom layer to the sides, pulling the pins out as you go. This is the trickiest part. But you’re almost done!
    Mason Jar Tea Cozy Tutorial by WaterPenny for Modabakeshop.com 


    Put it all together:

    • Turn the inside piece right side out.  Tuck this inside piece into the outer layer, so that right sides are together and the batting is on the outside. Pin along the top  at the fold lines.
    Mason Jar Tea Cozy Tutorial by WaterPenny for Modabakeshop.com
    • Sew along the top of the two pieces, using a quarter inch seam allowance. But wait! BE SURE to leave a two inch gap unsewn:
    • Mason Jar Tea Cozy Tutorial by WaterPenny for Modabakeshop.com
    • Now reach in there to pull your piece right side out through the two inch gap you left unsewn at the top. You’re almost there!
    Mason Jar Tea Cozy Tutorial by WaterPenny for Modabakeshop.com

    • Tuck the inner lining in. I usually iron the top for a nicer finish, folding in the unsewn seams.
    • Topstitch around the outer edge to finish.

    Optional: Attach a cute vintage button to hang your teabag from so it doesn’t get lost in your mason jar!

      Mason Jar Tea Cozy Tutorial by WaterPenny for Modabakeshop.com

      Make it your own! 

      You can add binding around the top – just like a quilt! One the cozy below on the right, I used Aneela Hoey’s Sew Stitchy Spools, and added a fat binding using standard quilting methods to the top.

      One Mason Jar Tea Cozy
      Mason Jar Tea Cozy Tutorial by WaterPenny for Modabakeshop.com

      Let me know if you have any questions! I’d love to see your own spin on the cozy mason jar cover!
      Happy Sewing! 
      Dana Kuhnline

      Quilted Patchwork Pouch

      Hi!  I’m Julie from 627handworks.com.  My main love is quilting but I always enjoy making a good pouch.  Zipper bags are fun to make whether you are a seasoned quilter or just started sewing. Is there really such a thing as too many bags?  Never.

      I love how the Mini Charms make it easy to put together a scrappy look. I’ve taken some of my favorite pouch options and combined them into a quilted zipper bag.
      Gather up your materials.


      1 Mini Charm Pack – Sunnyside by Kate Spain
      1 Coordinating Fat Quarter
      11″ Zipper
      (2) 12 x 10 Pieces of Batting


      1/2″ D-Ring for Pull Tab
      Interfacing for lining fabric

      PIECING

      Break open those Mini Charms.

      Choose 36 charms for your quilted exterior, 2 for your zipper stops and 2 for your pull tab.

      Lay out the exterior charms. Notice there are no charms on the bottom corners. 

       When piecing little charms for patchwork I like to chain sew. Use a 1/4″ seam for piecing.

      Don’t iron quite yet – wait until you have strip sets (rows of charms) in place.

      When have your strip sets sewn together, iron the seams with each row going opposite directions.

      This makes it easy for lining up the rows. You won’t even need to pin!  The way you’ve ironed the seams helps lock them together for sewing.

      If you feel more comfortable pinning, go for it.  I’m okay using this method for smaller projects that are easier to handle.

      Now you should have 2 pieced panels similar to this.

      PULL TAB

      Make the pull tab by taking 2 of the charms we put aside and sew them together, ironing the seam open.  

      Iron lengthwise to mark the center and open it up.   Now fold and iron the edges to the center iron line.

      Fold in half again and stitch down the edge of each side.

      Optional D-Ring:  Fold your tab in half and stitch the ring in place.

      FABRIC STOPS

      Take 2 more of the charms we pulled aside. These will be used as fabric stops for the zipper.

      Fold in half, iron and open.  Fold and iron a generous 1/4″.

      QUILTING

      Layer your batting under your fabric panel.

      The quilting design is up to you!  I stitched straight, diagonal lines through the middle of each charm.

      If you do a lot of straight line quilting, chalk markers will line right against your ruler. Makes it kind of nice.

      Trim the batting, be careful not to cut any of the charms.

      I don’t place fabric on the underside and I’ve never had a problem without it.  You can use muslin or scrap fabric if you want, but this will all be hidden.

      Cut two 8.5″ x 10.5″ rectangles from your fat quarter. This will be your lining.

      Optional Interfacing: Iron the interfacing to your fabric.  I like using interfacing because it provides extra stability.

      Trim your lining and cut a 2″ square from the bottom corners so they resemble the shape of the quilted panels.

      ASSEMBLY

      You should have something like this:

      Take a fabric zipper stop and fold it over the edge of the zipper end.  Sew along the folded edge of the stop to attach.

      Open the little tab and cut the zipper down to 1/4″ seam. This removes extra material so the corners aren’t so bulky.

      Attach the other fabric zipper stop – leaving 8″ between the two stops.  Trim the extra zipper material from the inside of that stop as well.

      Layer:
      Quilted exterior right side up
      Zipper facing down
           (center the fabric stops so the same amount of fabric sticks out on the right and left)
      Lining right side down

      Using a zipper foot sew along the top edge of the exterior-zipper-lining sandwich.

      Fold the sewn layers off to one side and layer:

      Quilted exterior right side up
      Zipper facing down
           (the first set of fabrics should be folded down with the other fabrics and out of the way)
      Lining right side down

      Using a zipper foot sew along the top edge.

      Fold each side open. A lining and quilted panel should be wrong sides together on each side.

      Top stitch along each side of the zipper and trim the extra fabric off the zipper stops.

      Fold the two lining fabrics together – right sides facing.

      Fold the two quilted panels together – right sides facing.

      Place the pull tab on the inside where the zipper pull will be when the pouch is closed.  If the pull tab is too long for your liking, trim a 1/2″ off first.

      Make sure your zipper is OPEN!

      Line up the top stitching from the two quilted panels and pin in place on each side. This keep your sides lined up. 

      Sew using a 1/2″ seam down the sides like the image below.  Don’t sew the corners. Remember to leave a turning hole!

      Once the sides are sewn, separate a corner and fold the seams together.  Sew using 1/2″ seam.

      Repeat for all corners and you should have something that resembles this.

      See that little hole we left in the lining?  Stick your hand in there and start pulling the bag right side out.

      This is why we left that zipper open!

      Sew your lining hole closed. This is a good spot to sew in a label.

      Stuff the lining down inside the pouch and poke out the corners of the bag and the zipper.

      Don’t use anything sharp or you’ll stab right through your fabric creating an ugly little hole.  I may or may not have done this before. And I may or may not have done it more than once.

       


      One Awesome Quilted Patchwork Pouch

      Ta-da!  Your pouch is complete. 
      If you make a patchwork pouch I’d love to see it!
      Julie Hirt 

      Sweet as Candy Pincushion


      Hello! It’s Lisa Calle of Vintage Modern Quilts here with a quick recipe using your favorite pieces of Moda Candy.  I came up with this cute and fast little pincushion as a way to use some of my Moda twill tape. I’ve saved every piece of it since I started buying pre-cuts (Please tell me I’m not the only one who does this?!). They’re just tucked away and looking lonely in a jar on the shelf.

      I just had to make use of them! Even with the small-scale piecing, this pincushion is a fast and simple project.

      1 package of Moda Candy (I used Mama Said Sew by Sweetwater)
      6 pieces of Moda twill tape from a Jelly Roll or Fat Quarter Bundle OR 108 inches of binding
      12 charm squares OR 12 pieces of 5″x5″ scraps
      12 pieces of 5″x5″ batting
      Filling (I used crushed walnut shells)


      These instructions show you how to make 1 pincushion. A package of Moda Candy plus the ingredients listed above will yield 6 pincushions.

      1. Choose seven pieces of Candy for your pincushion top: four pieces for the 4-patch, 2 sashing fabrics, and 1 center fabric

      2. Mark a line down the center of two of your 4-patch pieces. (I press a line with my iron). Place 1 marked piece and one unmarked piece right sides together and sew 1/4″ away from the line.

      Cut along the line and press. Repeat for your other two 4-patch pieces.

      3. Mark or press a line down the center of the 4-patch strips you’ve sewn, going perpendicular to the seam. Repeat the process of sewing 1/4″ from each side of the line, cutting, and pressing. You now have four itty bitty 4-patch blocks.

      4. Cut your sashing squares in half: each sashing strip will measure 2.5″ x 1.25″ (with about 0.5″ of the length as excess that you’ll trim off later). Set aside.

      5. Cut your center square. I chose a cute portion of one fabric to fussy cut a star and some text. This center square measures 1.25″ x 1.25.”

      6. Assemble your block in rows. Press your seams towards the sashing on the 4-patch rows and towards the center block on the middle strip.

      7. Match points, pin, and sew your block together.

      8. Layer up with one charm square, your batting piece, and your block on top. Quilt as desired. If you don’t want any quilting, at least baste the edges together. Use your ruler and rotary cutter to square up to 4.25 inches.

       You now have a cute mini quilt pincushion top!

      Optional – sew a length of Moda twill tape that reads “Moda” on the backing square for your pincushion. I hand-stitched mine on because I only thought of this after I’d made the pincushion.

      9. Place your pincushion top wrong sides together with your backing charm square. Sew a 1/4″ seam all around your pincushion, leaving a small opening for the filler. I like to mark my stopping point with a pin or Clover clip.

      10. Sew a zig zag stitch at one end of your Moda twill tape.This will help prevent fraying. You can also use fray check if you have some on hand.

      11. Attach your Moda twill tape as binding. Start just after the opening you’ve left and sew on just like bias tape, folding the twill tape at each corner to miter them.

      12. Fill the pincushion with crushed walnut shells. (NOTE: You can find these in the bird section of a pet store. The bag is huge so share with a couple of friends.)

      13. Stitch the opening closed and finish adding your twill tape binding. Be sure to zig zag the end to prevent fraying. Overlap the beginning of the twill tape by an inch or so. It is helpful to use your zipper foot for this step.


       One Sweet as Candy Pincushion! (That’s my son’s little hand in the photo. He just had to touch those yellow pins.)

      Repeat x 5 to use up your entire pack of Moda Candy. Each pincushion measures about 4.5″ square. These can also be used as pattern weights. They make a great gift for your sewing friends and this pincushion looks sew stylish in solids (the Bella Solids 2012 colors are available as Moda Candy.) See what other Moda Candy is available {here} and check your favorite LQS to see which ones they have in stock.

      Hope you enjoyed this recipe. If you make a pincushion, be sure to brag about it in the {Moda Bake Shop group on Flickr}.

      Happy sewing!

      Lisa Calle
      {vintagemodernquilts.com}

      Ring of Memories



      Hi! It’s Quilted Works blogging with you today on the Moda Bake Shop. We are excited to be here again to share a unique project created by Rhonda Ferguson, an instructor here at Quilted Works. This super easy “Ring of Memories” is sure to be a project you’re going to want to make. It’s just perfect as a gift for little ones, because we all know kids LOVE to see pictures of themselves. And what a great way to accomplish that…with fabric of course!

      • Family Pictures
      • Charm Pack (one square for each picture)
      • Iron-on Photo Transfer Paper
      • Hobbs Batting – 3 1/2″ square for every two pictures
      • 1/4″ (6mm) Eyelets and setting tools
      • 2-inch metal book ring (found at office supply stores)



      Picture Preparation:
      * We realize there are numerous Photo Editing programs and different techniques you can use to edit your photos for print. Please choose whatever you’re comfortable with or follow our simple instructions.


      Bring family pictures into a photo editing program and crop pictures to make them square. Make sure you leave enough room on the top left or right hand corner so that the eyelet will not interfere with the faces in your pictures – this should be approximately 1/2″. Save pictures to your desktop.

      In Microsoft Word, open up a new document. Go to margins, and adjust them to .25″ on all sides. Go to Insert Picture, and insert a picture from the desktop. With the picture highlighted, click on text wrapping. Click on square (this allows you to move the picture anywhere on the page). In the picture toolbar, adjust the size to 3 1/2 x 3 1/2″. Move the picture to the top left hand corner.

      Insert a total of six pictures onto the page using the steps listed above. Pictures will be end to end with the paper having 1/4″ margins. *You can print the photos any size you wish. We did the 3 1/2″ x 3 1/2″ to maximize the use of our photo transfer paper.



      Remove any paper from your printer’s paper tray and insert photo transfer paper (one at a time) into the tray. Using manufacturer’s directions, adjust settings as needed for your printer and print.


      Continue to replace pictures in your layout with new pictures and print each new page of pictures.

      Cut out pictures to 3 1/2 x 3 1/2″.



      Choose a charm square for each picture. Place the picture in the center of the charm square and iron it on, according to manufacturer’s directions.
       


      Sewing Instructions:
      To reinforce the picture, sew 1/8″ inside each picture.



      Group pictures in sets of two. Remember that you need to leave room for the eyelet so it doesn’t interfere with faces in the picture.



      Make a sandwich with a picture square (right side down), then a layer of batting (centered over picture) and last another picture square (right side up).

      Pin the square in each corner, lining up the corner of the top picture, the corner of the batting and the corner of the bottom picture.  Follow these instructions for each set of pictures.


      With coordinating thread, sew 1/8″ away from edge of picture.


      Eyelets:

      Following directions on eyelet package, place eyelet in top left hand corner of each picture square.

      We placed the eyelet on the picture and traced the inside, then cut out that small circle to fit the eyelet piece inside.


      Trim edges of fabric square with pinking shears to desired size. I trimmed 1/4″ from each side.



      Slide picture squares onto the 2″ metal ring and you’re done!  
       



      One darling Photo Book! The perfect gift for baby!!!

      Quilted Works
      {www.quiltedworks.com}