Summer Sand and Stars Quilt


  
Summer Sand and Stars is about stars! Big stars, little Stars, embedded stars, floating stars…all made from the same basic set of instructions.  Playing with shadows and color, it is the perfect picture of summer daydreams and night sailing.

This quilt is made from 12 large blocks, set in a 3 x 4 grid.  There is one border with one setting square.


  • Stars: 1 Fat Quarter Bundle – I used Catalina Batiks
  • Backgrounds:
    • 1¾ yards light – I used SKU #4328-41 from Summer Vacation Batiks
    • 2½ yards dark – I used SKU #4328-42 from Summer Vacation Batiks
  • Binding: ¾ yards – I used SKU #4329-29 from Catalina Batiks
  • Backing: 5½ yards  – I used SKU #4329-30 from Catalina Batiks
  • It will also be helpful to have at least 13 Ziploc sandwich bags to hold your pieces.
  • 3 pieces of printer paper – on which to print a paper foundation pattern for the tiniest stars. When you print the patter be certain that the longest dotted line of the pattern measures 5″.  If it does not you can adjust its size by fiddling with the sizing on your printer. The Printer Friendly file at the end of this post has the foundation pattern for the star.

Determine Color Placement. Think of your quilt as a piece of 8½” x 11″ white printer paper.  In your mind, draw a line from one corner of the paper to its diagonal opposite. The colors in my quilt are loosely arranged along this line. The cooler colors (blues, purples, and greens) live in the north, above the line, and the warmer colors (reds, yellows, and oranges) live to the south, below the line. Sparkle happens when you let some of the colors drift across the imaginary border line.  It creates little pockets of interest that keep your eyes moving across the quilt.

 

Look at the gray scale drawing below.  Each block of the quilt is numbered.  The light and dark backgrounds are shaded respectively with white and dark gray.  The cold colors are black.  The warm colors are light gray.  Some blocks have three fabric in them.  Where this is the case an additional gray is used.

With all these things in mind, turn to your stack of fabrics. You want to select the fabrics for each square and label them accordingly.

Fat Quarter cutting diagram

Each Big Star (1 center square and 8 points) can be made from 1 fat quarter with enough left over to make one Center Star and a Tiny Star.   You could make the Big Star in block #2 and the Center Star in block #9, and one of the Tiny Stars in block #11 all from the same fat quarter, but no more

NOTE: Blocks 2, 3, 5, and 6 share a Quarter Star and so do blocks 4, 5, 7, and 8. You want to make sure that you use the same fabric for these pieces.

Block Types. There are 7 different block types in this quilt.  Their placement is illustrated in the drawing below and the block types are shown in the other diagram.

 

Before you start cutting, make labels for your blocks and block components so you can keep track of all the pieces. Label 13 different Ziplocs with numbers 1 through 13 (these are for the 12 blocks in the quilt top plus the star block pieced into the border). Make additional Post-It labels for each individual block and stick them on the Ziploc bags. Use Wonder Clips or paper clips to keep the pieces for each type of star together if desired.

  • Bag #1 | Labels for Big Star 1 (BS1) and Tiny Star 1 (TS1)
  • Bag #2 | Labels for BS2 and Quarter Star 1 (QS1)
  • Bag #3 | Labels for BS3, Center Star 1 (CS1), and QS1
  • Bag #4 | Labels for BS4  and QS2
  • Bag #5 | Labels for BS5, QS1, and QS2
  • Bag #6 | Labels for BS6 and QS1
  • Bag #7 | Labels for BS7 and QS2
  • Bag #8 | Labels for BS8 and QS2
  • Bag #9 | Labels for BS9 and CS2
  • Bag #10 | Labels for BS10 and CS3
  • Bag #11 | Labels for BS11 and TS2
  • Bag #12| Labels for BS12 and Tiny Embedded Star (TES)
  • Bag #13 | Labels for Tiny Floating Star (TFS)

CUTTING DIRECTIONS
Cut the pieces for one block at a time. When cutting from fat quarters, cut the biggest pieces you need first. When cutting background fabric, cut a 5½” x WOF strip.  Starting with the biggest pieces, cut all of your pieces from this strip.  Save any leftover bits and use them for the smaller cuts as you go.  You should have plenty of fabric.

BLOCK 1A | Big Star 1 + Tiny Star 1

  • BS1, cut (4) 5½” squares for points and (1) 9½” square for center
  • TS1, cut (1) 2¾” square for center and (8) 1½” x 2″ for points
  • Background (light), cut:
    • (4) 5½” squares for Big Star points
    • (3) 5″ squares for Big Star corner patches
    • (4) 1¾” squares for corner patches of Tiny Star
    • (4) 1¾” x 2¾” rectangles for edge patches of Tiny Star
  • Paper Pattern for Tiny Star. Be certain that the longest dotted line of the pattern measures 5″.

BLOCK 2B | Big Star 2 + Quarter Star 1

  • BS2, cut (4) 5½” squares for points and (1) 9½” square for center
  • QS1, cut (1) 3½” square for Quarter Star points and (1) 2¾” square for center
  • Background (dark), cut:
    • (3) 5” squares for Big Star corner patches
    • (4) 5½” squares for Big Star points
    • (1) 3½” square for Quarter Star points
    • (1) 2¾” square  for Quarter Star corner

BLOCK 3C | Big Star 3 + Center Star 1 + Quarter Star 1

  • BS3, cut (4) 5½” squares for points, (4) 2¾” squares for block corners, and (4) 3½” squares for points
  • CS1, cut (1) 5” square for center and (4) 3½” squares for points
  • QS1, cut (1) 2¾” square  for center and (1) 3½” square for points
  • Background (dark), cut:
    • (3) 5” squares for corners
    • (4) 5½” squares for Big Star points
    • (1) 2¾” square  for Quarter Star corner
    • (1) 3½” square for Quarter Star points

BLOCK 4B | Big Star 4 + Quarter Star 2

  • BS4, cut (4) 5½” squares for points and (1) 9½” square for center
  • QS2, cut (1) 3½” square for points and (1) 2¾” square for center
  • Background (dark), cut:
    • (3) 5” squares for Big Star corner patches
    • (4) 5½” squares for Big Star points
    • (1) 3½” square for Quarter Star points
    • (1) 2¾” square for Quarter Star corner

BLOCK 5D | Big Star 5 + Quarter Star 1 + Quarter Star 2

  • BS5, cut (4) 5½” squares for points and (1) 9½” square for center
  • QS1, cut (1) 3½” square for points and (1) 2¾” square for center
  • QS2, cut (1) 3½” square for points and (1) 2¾” square for center
  • Background (dark), cut:
    • (2) 5” squares for Big Star corner patches
    • (4) 5½” squares for Big Star points
    • (2) 3½” squares for Quarter Star points
    • (2) 2¾” squares for Quarter Star corners

BLOCK 6B | Big Star 6 + Quarter Star 1

  • BS1, cut (4) 5½” squares for points and (1) 9½” square for center
  • QS1, cut (1) 3½” square for points and (1) 2¾” square for center
  • Background (light), cut:
    • (3) 5” squares for Big Star corner patches
    • (4) 5½” squares for Big Star points
    • (1) 3½” square for Quarter Star points
    • (1) 2¾” square for Quarter Star corner

BLOCK 7B | Big Star 7 + Quarter Star 2

  • BS7, cut (4) 5½” squares for points and (1) 9½” square for center
  • QS2, cut (1) 3½” square for points and (1) 2¾” square for center
  • Background (dark), cut:
    • (3) 5” squares for Big Star corner patches
    • (4) 5½” squares for Big Star points
    • (1) 3½” square for Quarter Star points
    • (1) 2¾” square for Quarter Star corner

BLOCK 8B | Big Star 8 + Quarter Star 2

  • BS8, cut (4) 5½” squares for points and (1) 9½” square for center
  • QS2, cut (1) 3½” square for points and (1) 2¾” square for center
  • Background (dark), cut:
    • (3) 5” squares for Big Star corner patches
    • (4) 5½” squares for Big Star points
    • (1) 3½” square for Quarter Star points
    • (1) 2¾” square for Quarter Star corner

BLOCK 9E | Big Star 9 + Center Star 2

  • BS9, cut (4) 5½” squares for points, (4) 2¾” squares for center block corners, and (4) 3½” squares for points
  • CS2, cut (1) 5” square for center and (4) 3½” squares for points
  • Background (dark), cut:
    • (4) 5″ squares for Big Star corners
    • (4) 5½” squares for Big Star points

BLOCK NUMBER 10E | Big Star 10 + Center Star 3

  • BS10, cut (4) 5½” squares for points, (4) 2¾” squares for center block corners, and (4) 3½” squares for points
  • CS3, cut (1) 5” square for center and (4) 3½” squares for points
  • Background (light), cut:
    • (4) 5″ squares for Big Star corners
    • (4) 5½” squares for Big Star points

BLOCK NUMBER 11A | Big Star 11 + Tiny Star 2

  • BS11, cut (4) 5½” squares for points and (1) 9½” square for center
  • TS2, cut (1) 2¾” square for center and (8) 1½” x 2″ for points
  • Background (light), cut:
    • (4) 5½” squares for Big Star points
    • (3) 5″ squares for Big Star corner patches
    • (4) 1¾” squares for corner patches of Tiny Star
    • (4) 1¾” x 2¾” rectangles for edge patches of Tiny Star
  • Paper Pattern for Tiny Star. Be certain that the longest dotted line of the pattern measures 5″.

BLOCK NUMBER 12F | Big Star 12 + Tiny Embedded Star

  • BS12, cut:
    • (3) 5” squares for Big Star center
    • (4) 5½” squares for Big Star points
    • (4) 1¾” squares for corner patches of Tiny Embedded Star
    • (4) 1¾” x 2¾” rectangles for edge patches of Tiny Embedded Star
  • TS1, cut (1) 2¾” square for center and (8) 1½” squares for points
  • Background (dark), cut:
    • (4) 5” squares for corner patches
    • (4) 5½” squares for Big Star points
  • Paper Pattern for Tiny Embedded Star. Be certain that the longest dotted line of the pattern measures 5″

BORDERS + 13 G | Tiny Floating Star

  • TFS, cut (1) 3½” square for center and (4) 2½” squares for points
  • Background (light), cut:
    • (4) 2″ squares for Tiny Floating Star corners
    • (4) 2½” squares for Tiny Floating Star points
  • Light background, cut (4) 6½” x WOF strips
  • Dark background, cut (4) 6½” x WOF strips

BINDING: cut (8) 2½” x WOF strips

If you have cut and labeled all of those pieces you deserve a break.  Step away from the table and the rotary cutter.  Go outside and breath some fresh air.  Gaze at the sky.  Listen to the sounds that surround you.  Breath.

Make sure you take a break after you cut your pieces.

SEWING DIRECTIONS
As much as you are tempted to create a production line, play it safe and make only one block at a time.

Block A

Block A {There are 2 A type blocks. Gather bags 1 and 11 plus foundation pattern for tiny stars.}

  • Tiny Star.  Make 1 tiny star per block. Use the tutorial located {here} to paper foundation piece the tiny stars.
  • Big Star.  Create Double Half Square Triangles (HSTs).
    • Draw a diagonal line on the wrong side of 5½” background squares. Layer 1 background block with 1 star color block, right sides together. Sew ¼” on each side of the drawn diagonal line. Iron to set seams. Cut on drawn line to create 2 (HSTs). Gently iron seam allowances open. Trim to 5″ square. Repeat 3 times for a total of 8 HSTs.
Half Square Triangle Construction

  • Sew HSTs together in 4 sets of 2 so that the seam line marks the center of a large triangle of background fabric. Sew seam allowances open. Arrange pieces on desk or design wall in front of you to match drawing of block A.
Double HST

Piece A blocks together in rows, using the components you have created plus the background squares.

Big Star A, row 1
Big Star, row 2
Big Star, row 3

Iron seam allowances away from the double HSTs. Trim blocks to 18½” square. Create 2 of these blocks.

Block B

Block B {There are 5 B type blocks. Gather bags 2, 4, 6, 7, and 8.}

  • Quarter Star. Repeat process from A blocks to make 4 HSTs.Trim to 2¾” square. Join Quarter Star HSTs with background and print squares to make a Quarter Star unit as shown below. Trim to 5” square. Make a total of 5 Quarter Star units.

Quarter Star
  • Big Star. Repeat process as described for Block A replacing Tiny Star with Quarter Star when putting the block rows together. Be sure that the Quarter Star is on the outside corner of the block.

Block C

Block C. {There is only one type C block. Gather bag number 3.}

  • Repeat process for Quarter Star as described for Block B
  • Repeat process for double HSTs as described for Block A
  • Center Star. Repeat process for Big Star in Block A with smaller pieces. Use 3 1/2″ x 3 1/2″ squares for HSTs. Trim HSTs to 2¾” square. Arrange pieces to create a 9½” square star just like the big star but with 4 plain corners. Piece together the row components for block C:
    • Row 1: 5″ square background fabric; double HST with background triangle pointing down; 5″ x 5″ square background fabric.
    • Row 2: double HST with background triangle pointed to the right; 9 1/2″ x 9 1/2″ whole star block; double HST with background triangle pointing to the left
    • Row 3: Quarter Star with star fabric on bottom left edge; double HST with background triangle pointing up; 5″ x 5″ square background fabric
Block D

Block D. {There is only one type D block. Gather bag number 5.}

  • Repeat process for Block B replacing one 5″ background square with a Quarter Star
  • Rows 1 and 3 of this block are the same….but flipped.
Block E

Block E. {There are 2 E type blocks.  Gather bags 9 and 10.}

  • Repeat process for Block C replacing Quarter Star with a 5” background square.

Block F

Block F. {There is only one type F block. Gather bag number 12.}

  • Make Tiny star as described in Block A
  • Using Tiny star and (3) 5″ square star fabric make 4 patch.
  • Trim 4 patch to 9½”’ square to make center of block
  • Repeat process as described in Block A, replacing tiny star in corner with a 5″ square of background fabric.

Block G. {There is only one type F block. Gather bag number 13.}

  • Repeat process for Big Star in Block A with smaller pieces.
    • Use 2 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ squares for HSTs
    • Trim HSTs to 2″ x 2″
  • Arrange pieces to create a 6 1/2″ x 6 1/2″ star just like the big star but with 4 plain corners.

QUILT ASSEMBLY
Make sure all blocks are trimmed to 18½” square and join them together as shown below.

Block placement

Block placement

  • Be careful to keep the Quarter Stars pointing in the right directions.  You want them to create whole stars when the blocks are sewn together.
  • Sew 4 rows of 3 blocks each
  • Iron seam allowances to the right in rows 1 and 3 and to the left in rows 2 and 4
  • Sew rows together to complete center of top

BORDERS

  • Gather setting star, block G, (4) 6½” x WOF strips light background,  and (4) 6½” x WOF strips dark background
  • Measure quilt. It should be something like 54½” wide by 72½” long. Record measurements:
    •  ___________ wide
    •  ___________ long
  • Sew 2 light background strips together along short edge, creating a strip that is approximately 6 1/2″ x 84″
  • Trim newly created strip to 6 1/2″ x length of quilt
  • Sew to lighter/warmer side of quilt top.  In the diagram it will be to the right.
  • Iron seam allowance towards the border.
  • Repeat process with dark background, sewing strip on the opposite side of the top.
  • Measure width of quilt and record _______________.  (It should be close to 66 1/2″)
  • Sew remaining dark background strips together to make a strip that is 6 1/2″ x width of your quilt.
  • Sew to top of quilt.
  • Iron seam allowances towards the border.
  • Sew remaining light background strips and setting star block G together, with the star on one end to make a strip that is 6 1/2″ x width of your quilt.
  • Iron seam allowance between strip and block towards the strip.
  • Sew to bottom of quilt making sure that the star block falls to the left side, under the light background border.
  • Iron seam allowance towards the border.

Layer, baste, and quilt as desired.

I hope you enjoy making my quilt.  Be sure to share it with the other Tops to Treasures quilters on the Tops to Treasures flickr group.

A fun 67″ x 85″ throw or topper for a star struck twin bed.

Cindy Sharp
{topstotreasures.blogspot.com}

Winter Wonderland Peaks & Paddocks Quilt


Have you ever found a fabric line that made you squeal right there in the middle of the fabric shop? Have you ever found one that made you giggle with glee and rush to share it with your best quilty friends?  Winter Wonderland by Bunny Hill for Moda did that to me!  I am beyond thrilled to be able to share my quilt made from it with all of you!

I love, love, love the snowmen and the trucks.  What could be better than snowmen driving pick up trucks….perhaps a snugly quilt to make you laugh and keep you warm?!

detail of Winter Wonderland panel

Peaks & Paddocks is a simple quilt made from one, funky block.

I think I was thinking Snowball. I ended up with a center-less Shoo-flly.  Either way, the block screams, “You got it wrong!”  I wanted to find out what would happen if you made a bunch of blocks, all with the same irritating mistake in them, more on that later.


General Description of Quilt
16, 12” finished blocks in a 4 x 4 grid
2 borders
               1” finished inner border with tiny half square triangle (hst) setting squares
               4” finished outer border with large hst setting squares
As described the quilt finishes out at 59” x 59”


 
Fabric Requirements:
Blocks
What I used
           Red on White
1 ¾ yards
Selections from fat quarter bundle SKU#2870AB
           White on Red
½ yard
           Red on Red
¼ yard
           White on White
¼ yard
Inner Border + Binding
¾ yard
SKU#2875-15 red on red, twigs & berries
Outer Border
1 ¼ yards
SKU#2871-12 red on white, snowmen
Backing
3 ½ yards
SKU#2872-18 white on red, cars
Cutting Directions:
  • From Red on White
    •  80, 4 ½” x 4 ½” squares
      • Cut a total of 20, 4 ½” x 18” rectangles from fat quarters
      •  Sub cut each rectangle into 4, 4 ½” x 4 ½” squares for a total of 80 squares
    •  24, 5” x 5” squares for half square triangles (HSTS)
      • Cut a total of 6, 5” x 22” rectangles from fat quarters
      • Sub cut each rectangle into 4, 5” x 5” squares for a total of 24 squares
  • From White on Red
    • 24, 5” x 5” squares for HSTS
      • Cut a total of 6, 5” x 22” rectangles from fat quarters
      • Sub cut each rectangle into 4, 5” x 5” squares for a total of 24 squares
  • From Red on Red
    • 8, 5” x 5” squares for HSTS
      • Cut a total of 2, 5” x 22” rectangles from fat quarters
      • Sub cut each rectangle into 4, 5” x 5” squares for a total of 8 squares
  • From White on White
    • 8, 5” x 5” squares for HSTS
      • Cut a total of 2, 5” x 22” rectangles from fat quarters
      • Sub cut each rectangle into 4, 5” x 5” squares for a total of 8 squares
  • From Inner Border Fabric
    • 5, 1 1/2” x width of fabric (wof) strips for inner border
    • 2, 2” x 2” squares for inner border setting squares for HSTS
    • 2, 5” x 5” squares for outer border setting squares for HSTS
    • 6, 2 ½” x wof strips for binding
  •  From Outer Border Fabric
    • 5, 4 ½” x wof strips for outer border
    • 2, 2” x 2” squares for inner border setting squares for HSTS
    • 2, 5” x 5” squares for outer border setting squares for HSTS

Sewing Directions:
  •  Blocks
    • General description
      • Each 12” finished block (actually measures 12 ½” x 12 ½” to allow for ¼” seam allowances) is made from 9, 4 ½” x 4 ½” patches.
        • 5 patches are 4 ½” x 4 ½” squares
        •  4 patches are pieced HSTS 

      • The block is based on the classic Shoo-fly design with two exceptions.
        1. There is not contrasting center to my block.
        2.  One of the corners is WRONG!  If you looked at the picture above and thought, “Oh, Cindy drew this one wrong.”  You are absolutely right; however, I did it on purpose.  Over the last 11 months I have been exploring what happens when you make a bunch of blocks wrong on purpose.  The results might surprise you.  They did me.  You can check them out under the “Oops” tab of my block of the month blog, Quilty Friends.
    • HSTS
      • Gather 
        • 24, 5″ x 5″ squares red on white fabric for traditional corners
        • 24, 5″ x 5″ squares white on red fabric for traditional corners
        • 8, 5″ x 5″ squares red on red fabric for WRONG corners
        • 8, 5″ x 5″ squares white on white fabric for WRONG corners
      • On the wrong side of all squares with white background draw a diagonal line.
      • Layer 1 red on white square with 1 white on red square, right sides together
      • Sew 1/4 from each side of drawn line…yes, sew twice.
      • Cut on drawn line.
      • Being careful not to warp triangles, gently iron triangles open…into squares.
      • Iron seam allowances open.
      • You now have 2, HSTS
      • Trim HSTS to 4 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ square
      • Repeat process with all red on white and white on red squares for a total of 48 HSTS for traditional corner patches
      • Repeat process with all red on red and white on white squares for a total of 16 HSTS for WRONG corner patches
    • BLOCKS
      • Gather
        • 48 traditional corner patch HSTS
        • 16 WRONG corner patch HSTS
        • 80, 4 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ red on white squares
      • Making one block at a time, arrange 9 pieces in front of you to match drawing.
      • Be careful to get the red triangles oriented correctly.
      • Sew patches together to make rows
        • Row 1: traditional HST with RED down and to the right; red on white square; traditional HST with RED down and to the left.
        • Row 2: red on white square; red on white square; red on white square
        • Row 3: WRONG HST with Red down and to the left; red on white square; traditional HST with Red UP and to the left.
      • Iron seam allowances towards the red on white square in rows 1 and 3
      • Iron seam allowances away from the center in row 2
      • Sew rows together to make block
      • Trim block to 12 1/2″ x 12 1/2″ square.
      • Repeat 15 times for a total of 16 blocks.
  • Quilt Top
    • Gather
      •  16 blocks
    • Arrange blocks in a 4 x 4 grid being careful to orient them so that the WRONG HST corners touch.  (see arrows in layout diagram above)
    • Sew sets of  4 block rows.
    • With the WRONG HST on the side closest to you, iron all seam allowances in the same direction.,
    • Sew rows together to make center of quilt.
      • NOTE: If you ironed the seam allowances as suggested, the allowances will snuggle together when you flip rows 2 and 4 to orient them correctly.
    • Iron seam allowances in the same direction.
    • Measure quilt and record below.
      • It should measure something like 48 1/2″ x 48 1/2″. 
      • ________ wide
      • ________ long
  • Borders
    • Inner Border
      • Gather
        • 5, 1 1/2” x width of fabric (wof) strips for inner border
        • 2, 2” x 2” squares inner border fabric
        • 2, 2” x 2” squares outer border fabric
      • Setting Squares
        • Using method described above make 4, 1 1/2″ x 1 1/2″ HSTS from 2″ x 2″ squares
      • Edge pieces
        • Cut 1, 1 1/2″ x wof strip into 4 equal pieces measuring 1 1/2″ x 10 1/2″ give or take.
        • Sew 1, 1 1/2″ x 10 1/2″ section to the skinny edge of each 1 1/2″ x wof strip.
        • Iron seam allowances open.
        • Using measurements recorded above, cut strips to lengths equal to the side of your top.  They should be very close to 1 1/2″ x 48 1/2″ each.
      • Sew edge pieces to 2, parallel sides of top.
      • Iron seam allowances toward the border.
      • Being careful to orient the corners in the correct direction, sew setting squares to ends of remaining edge pieces.  See diagram below.
      • Iron seam allowances toward the setting blocks.
      • Sew pieces to remaining border-less edges of quilt
      • Iron seam allowances toward borders.
      • Measure quilt and record below.
        • It should measure 50 1/2″ x 50 1/2″
        • _______wide
        • _______long
    • Outer Border
      • Gather
        • 5, 4 ½” x wof strips for outer border
        • 2, 5” x 5” squares outer border fabric
        • 2, 5” x 5” squares inner border fabric 
      • Setting Squares
        • Using the method described above make 4, 4 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ HSTS from 5″ x 5″ squares
      • Edge pieces
        • Cut 1, 4 1/2″ x wof strip into 4 equal pieces measuring 4 1/2″ x 10 1/2″ give or take.
        • Sew 1, 4 1/2″ x 10 1/2″ section to the skinny edge of each 4 1/2″ x wof strip.
        • Iron seam allowances open.
        • Using measurements recorded above, cut strips to lengths equal to the side of your top.  They should be very close to 4 1/2″ x 50 1/2″ each.
      • Sew edge pieces to 2, parallel sides of top.
      • Iron seam allowances towards the border.
      • Being careful to orient the corners in the correct direction, sew setting squares to ends of remaining edge pieces.  See diagram below.
      • Iron seam allowances toward the setting blocks.
      • Sew pieces to remaining border-less edges of quilt
      • Iron seam allowances toward borders.
  • Layer and quilt as desired.
    • I quilted mine with white thread in Christmas Snow by Anne Bright
detail from Winter Wonderland panel
I hope you enjoy my pattern.  Please share a picture of your completed quilt with me!  I have a Tops to Treasures Flickr group just for that purpose!  Come join the group.
Stop by my blog, Tops to Treasures to win one of the wonderful Winter Wonderland panels!

All Good Gifts Quilt


Hello.  Cindy Sharp from Tops to Treasures here again.  I am excited about this quilt for a number of reasons, but mostly because its inspiration stemmed from the loving heart of my oldest son.  Each step along the way was marked by the love of someone offering a good gift.

Good gift #1:  Each person my son meets becomes a candidate for a quilt from mom. Really, he  has no qualms about asking me to make one.  I’ve made them for coaches, room mates, and class fund raisers. This time he asked me to make one for a pregnant friend.

Good gift #2:  I was visiting with the ladies in the sample room at Moda and they suggested this line of fabric. “Mixed Bag” by Studio M is fun and funky, AND comes in brushed cotton….perfect for a snuggly baby quilt. Chelair tossed me a fat quarter stack and said “Send us the pattern when it is done!”

Good gift #3:  I started Tops to Treasures in 2006 as a long arm quilting business.  It pays for my quilty habit and helps my boys with college expenses.  Sometimes I let my friends come and use the machine for the cost of the materials.  (Honestly I love having company during the day.)  Jeanne was not satisfied with that arrangement.  Her solution….minion labor!! Jeanne volunteered to trade piecing for long arm time.  I’ve seen her piecing…not going to turn that offer down.  (Thank you my friend for piecing this quilt for me.)

So it went….one good gift leading to another.  I hope you enjoy it as much as I did.

The horrible truth is that I am a bit of an OCDC geek.  I love things to be orderly and in order.  It makes me happy to see books arranged by subject and author on my shelf, earrings neatly paired in little cubbies, my Lego blocks sorted by size and color, directions that are explicit and precise, you get where I’m going.

The opportunity to make a rainbow quilt makes me “Happy, happy, happy!”  just like the fabrics that inspired my design, Mixed Bag by Studio M. 

All Good Gifts is a simple quilt made of 42, 8″ x 8″ finished blocks, set in a lattice of 2″ sashing with corner stones.  The construction is straight forward and requires no special tools, or skills.  The challenge lies in the selection and placement of color.  With Roy G. Biv helping us, this should not be a problem.

The most challenging aspect of this quilt is the placement of colors.  The picture below assigns a number to each diagonal row.  All of the blocks in each row are identical.  Use these row numbers and reference the following chart to determine how much fabric you need.

There is enough fabric in a fat quarter stack to make the blocks of this quilt; however, you need to purchase an extra fat quarter for the frame in each row that has more than 5 blocks. (Specifically, rows 1 and 2.  They each have 6 blocks.)

In my quilt I chose to repeat the frame fabric used in row 1 (a long row) in rows 4, 9, and 12.  This required additional yardage as well. 

When making your fabric selections the following information is helpful:

  • There are 12 diagonal rows –
    • 12 different colors for centers – choose bright or deep tones.
      • You can repeat colors like I did – it uses less fabric or choose 12 different ones….just keep them in rainbow order. That is where my friend Mr. Roy G. Biv comes in. (Red, Orange, Yellow, Green, Blue, Indigo, Violet.)  I put red in the middle and worked out from both sides to blue.
      • You can cut 16 centers from one fat quarter
    • 12 different colors for frames – choose prints that help to blend from one center color to the next. 
      • I repeated a the multi on white.  Because it has most of the colors in it, transition is natural.  You don’t have to do that…I was just being lazy. 
      • You can cut  5 sets of frame pieces from one fat quarter
      • Rows 1 & 2 require 1/4 yard extra to cut all of the frame pieces.

Yardage Required
What I used
Blocks

FQ Stack *
*additional yardage needed for rows with more than 5 blocks
Mixed Bag by Studio M

Frames*

1/4 yd (row 1)
1/4 yd (row 2)
1/4 yd for duplicate frames

(rows 9, 12)
SKU#32860-11
SKU#32865-19
SKU#32860-11

 

Setting Squares
½ yd
SKU#32862-18 
Sashing
1 3/4 yds
SKU#9900-97 
Border
1 ½ yds
SKU#32865-19 
Binding
1 yd
SKU#32862-18 
Backing
5 1/4 yds
 

12 sandwich sized zip lock baggies

One very happy, 76″ x 86″ rainbow quilt to snuggle under or gift to someone you love.

Cutting Directions:

Before you begin cutting, it may be helpful to create a “swatch page” for your project.   I’ve created a page for you, it lists all of the pieces you need to cut (just like the cutting chart) plus it has a column for swatches.  Print this file Swatch Page with my compliments.  In the column headed “SWATCH” cut and paste a small sample of the fabrics you want to use for that row.  It will help keep everything organized – (read – this is so you know what you are doing when you finally get back to cutting out the project after the finishing 101 things that draw you away from your favorite hobby) 

  • Blocks
    • Cut the pieces for the blocks in each row as outlined in the chart below.
    • I highly recommend that you keep your pieces segregated in zip lock baggies.  One baggie for each row.
    • Centers –
      • Cutting a 4 1/2″ x 18″ strip from a fat quarter will yield 4, 4 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ squares
      • For rows with more than 4 blocks, cut 2, 4 1/2″ x 18″ strips.
    • Frames –
      • Cutting a 2 1/2″ x 18″ strip from a fat quarter will yield
        • 2, 8 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ rectangles for top and bottom OR
        • 4, 4 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ rectangles for sides
      • For 5 complete frames
        • Cut 8, 2 1/2″ x 18″ strips from a fat quarter
        • Sub-cut 3 strips into4, 4 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ squares each, for a total of 12rectangles.  (You will have two extra)
        • Sub-cut 5 strips into 2, 8 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ rectangles for a total of 10 rectangles.
Row
# of Blocks
4 ½” x 4 ½”
Centers
8 ½” x 2 ½”
Frame
 Top & Bottom
4 ½” x 2 ½”
Frame Sides
1
6
6
12
12
2
6
6
12
12
3
5
5
10
10
4
4
4
8
8
5
3
3
6
6
6
2
2
4
4
7
1
1
2
2
8
5
5
10
10
9
4
4
8
8
10
3
3
6
6
11
2
2
4
4
12
1
1
2
2

 

  • Setting Squares
    • 56, 2 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ squares
      • Cut 4, 2 1/2″ x width of fabric (wof) strips
      • Sub-cut 3 strips into 16, 2 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ squares each for a total of 48 squares
      • Cut 8, 2 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ squares from the remaining strip to complete 56.
  • Sashing
    • 97, 2 1/2″ x 8 1/2″ rectangles
      • Cut 7, 8 1/2″ x wof strips
      • Sub-cut 6, strips into 16, 2 1/2″ x 8 1/2″ rectangles each for a total of 96 rectangles
      • Cut 1, 2 1/2″ x 8 1/2″ rectangle from the remaining strip to complete 97.
  • Border
    • Cut 8, 5″ x wof strips
  • Binding
    • Cut 8, 2 1/2″ x wof strips

Break Time!

I sure hope that was better than I am thinking it is.  Right now it is “clear as mud” even to me.  I suspect I am tired from all of that cutting….and maybe you are too.

Clear as mud

Step away from the project.  Have some fun!  Go for a walk.  Clear your head.  That is where I am headed.
Thank you God!  That’s better.  I’ve reread the directions….I think it is the best that I can do.  If, however, you still have trouble understanding what you need to do feel free to contact me at cindy@topstotreasures.com.  I am more than happy to help.

Sewing Directions:

  •  Block – the goal is 42, 8″ x 8″ finished blocks

    •  Use the “Swatch Page” to remind yourself how many of each color to make.
    • To make one block –
      • Gather
        • 1, 4 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ center square
        • 2, 8 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ top & bottom rectangles
        • 2, 4 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ edge rectangles

      •  Sew 4 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ side rectangle to opposite sides of the 4 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ center square.
      • Iron seam allowance towards the center square
      • Sew 8 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ top/bottom rectangle to long edges of pieced unit.
      • Iron seam allowances towards the top/bottom rectangles.
      • Trim to 8 1/2″ x 8 1/2″
    • Repeat process 41 times to complete 42 blocks needed for project.
  •  Sashing
    • Gather
      • 97, 8 1/2″ x 2 1/2″  sashing rectangles
      • 56, 2 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ setting squares
      • 42, 8 1/2″ x 8 1/2″ blocks
    • Block Rows
      • Gather
        • 49, 8 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ sashing rectangles
        • 42, 8 1/2″ x 8 1/2″ blocks
      • Sort your blocks into 7 groups of 6 blocks each, one group for each horizontal row of the quilt.
      • Using the Swatch Page row numbers as a reference for color placement (#s designating the diagonal rows in the quilt) your horizontal rows (letters designating) should contain the following blocks:
        • A – 1, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12
        • B – 2, 1, 8, 9, 10, 11
        • C – 3, 2, 1, 8, 9, 10
        • D – 4, 3, 2, 1, 8, 9
        • E – 5, 4, 3, 2, 1, 8
        • F – 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1
        • G – 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2
      • Add 7, 8 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ sashing rectangles to each pile.
      • Being careful to keep the blocks in the right order, sew 1 sashing rectangle between each block in the row.
      • Iron seam allowances towards the blocks.
    • Sashing Rows
      • Gather
        • 56, 2 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ setting squares
        • 48, 8 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ sashing rectangles
      • Sew 48 sets of 2 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ setting square, + 8 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ sashing rectangle (they will look like matchsticks)
      • Iron seam allowances towards the setting square
      • Sew sets together to make 8 rows of 6 matchsticks each, tail to head.
      • Iron seam allowances towards the setting squares.
      • Sew 1 setting square to the stick end of each row.
      • Iron seam allowances towards the setting squares.
    • Top
      • Gather
        • 8, sashing rows
        • 7, block rows
      • Sew rows together as illustrated in the diagrams.
  • Border
    • Gather
      • Cut 8, 5″ x wof strips
    • Sew 4 sets of 2 strips each together, short edge to short edge.
    • Irons seam allowances open
    • Sew 1 set to each long edge of top.
    • Iron seam allowances towards the border
    • Trim excess
    • Sew 1 set to each short edge of top
    • Iron seam allowances towards the border
    • Trim excess
  • Finish – layer and quilt as desired!
    • I quilted mine in “Going in Circles” by Anne Bright. 
    • I used “Pearl” thread by Signature on the top of my quilt
    • I used “Cleopatra” thread by King Tut/Superior for the back and for the embroidered label.
I would love to see your quilt!  Send me a picture of it when you are done and/or feel free to add it to my Tops to Treasures group on Flickr.

Cindy Sharp
{www.topstotreasures.com}

Tiles Quilt


Hello,  my name is Cindy Sharp.  I am the person behind Tops to Treasures.  I am thrilled to be back with Moda’s Bake Shop today…presenting my original pattern, “Tiles.”

The name isn’t very flashy, but I could think of no better word to describe the effect of this pattern.  It takes me back to a time when things were made for both beauty and function, when floors were more than something to walk on, and back splashes did more than protect the kitchen wall.  
Using the Printemps line of fabric by 3 Sisters elevates my tiles to a whole other level.  These carefully pieced blocks no longer belong on a floor or wall, but in a garden filled with life and light and fresh air.  It is wholly appropriate that this line was given the name Printemps.  French for springtime, the name delivers all that it promises.
The drawings in my pattern feature a different line of fabric, also by 3 Sisters.  Vin du Jour provided the heady bouquet of color that inspired my pattern.  
In either fabric line the quilt is fantastic.  I hope you enjoy it as much as I do.
Tiles is made from 30 blocks that finish at 12″ square.  There are 15 blocks that turn one way and 15 blocks that turn the other.  You can see it in the quilt if you look for mirror images.  To get a better understanding look at the drawings below.  Pay close attention to the rotation of the edge pieces.  In the picture on the left  the golden arm is reaching toward the right….the edge patch arms all reach in the same rightward direction.  (Is rightward a word?  Did I just make that up?!)  In the other picture they all reach toward the left.
Right Reaching Block
Left Reaching Block
Each of the 30 blocks is made from 9 patches.  I like the center patch the best!  It is just a 4 1/2″ square!
Corner Patch
The corner patches are straight forward as well.  They are pieced, but the directions are the same for every corner patch in the quilt.
Left Reaching Edge Patch
The edge blocks are the tricky part.  Due to the restrictions of standard markings on my ruler (not just mine, yours are marked the same way) I chose to foundation piece this portion of the block.   Please don’t be turned off by this decision.  I’ve written a tutorial to help you with this type of construction.  The process is as straight forward as that used in the corner patches…it is just different.  Time to grow my quilty friends.  You can do this!  If you have any trouble understanding the process please feel free to contact me.  I’d love to walk you through it.
I designed Tiles to take advantage of dark and light colors in a fabric line.   There are several in the Moda line up that would work.  My drawings are all done using Vin du Jour by 3 Sisters.  It is a striking quilt when done in just a few colors.

My sample quilt is made using Printemps also by 3 Sisters.  This line is softer.  Where Vin du Jour is dramatic and bold, Printemps is romantic and subtle.  Using a softer pallet will create more of a blended quilt.

What ever you decide keep in mind that you need approximately the same amount of yardage for either option.

For a scrappy quilt, like mine, use the fat quarter equivalents listed in parenthesis.   There should be enough fabric in a fat quarter bundle to obtain the variety that you need, however, some fabric lines lean more heavily towards lights or darks.  If this is the case with the one you have chosen remember to supplement your bundle purchase with enough yardage to complete the light/dark requirements.

Yardage Required
(#FQs)
     SKU
What I used
Dark
1 1/4 yds (5)
44031-15
44037-15
44036-15
44030-15
44030-25
5 reds from Printemps by 3 Sisters
Light
1 1/4 yds (5)
44033-12
44032-22
44031-12
44030-22
44030-12
5 yellows from Printemps by 3Sisters
Lattice A
1 yd (4)
 44032-23
    44031-13
    44036-13
    44030-13
    44035-23
5 pinks from Printemps by 3 Sisters
Lattice B
1 yd (4)
    44037-14
    44031-14
    44032-24
    44030-24
    44030-14
5 aquas from Printemps by 3 Sisters
Background
2 3/4 yds
 44036-41 tiny pink floral on cream
Inner Border
½ yd
 44303-24 tone on tone aqua 
Outer Border
1 1/4 yds
 44033-12 medium floral on yellow
Binding
3/4 yd
 44037-15 white diamonds on red
Backing
5 yds
 44030-12 large floral on yellow
  • 12 Sandwich sized zip lock baggies:  To  make your P.I.G. (project in a sack) easier to corral I highly recommend placing your pieces in zip lock baggies as you cut them.  You will need 12 baggies to do this.  Place all 30, 4 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ dark squares in one bag, all 120, 2 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ dark squares in another bag, etc.  If you use the kind that has a freezer label built into it you can write yourself a note as to the size and purpose of the piece.  (I didn’t bag up my borders or binding.)
  • 60 paper copies of each page on the following file:  Edge Patch Pattern You should have 60 of each of 2 pages for a total of 120 pages.
    • Before you print 60 copies
      • Please make sure that the solid lines forming the right angles measure 4″
      • Mark the pattern pieces of the original copy so that you know which piece goes to which type of block.  (This will be important if your piles get knocked over.)
      • Consider making a few extra copies….just in case.
     
    Cutting Directions:
    • Darks
      • 30, 4 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ squares for center of blocks
        • If from yardage –
          • Cut 4, 4 1/2″ x width of fabric (wof) strips
          • Sub-cut 3 strips into 9, 4 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ squares each for a total of 27 squares
          • Sub-cut 3, 4 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ squares from the remaining strip to complete 30.
        • If from fat quarters
          • Cut 8, 4 1/2″ x 18″ strips
            • 2, 4 1/2″ x 18″strips from each of 3 fat quarters,
            • + 1, 4 1/2″ x 18″ strip from the 2 remaining for a total of 8 strips
          • Sub-cut strips into 4, 4 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ squares each for a total of 32.  (you will have two extra.)
      • 120, 2 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ squares for corner patches of blocks
        • If from yardage –
          • Cut 8, 2 1/2″ x wof strips
          • Sub-cut 7 strips into 16, 2 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ squares from each for a total of 112 squares
          • Sub-cut 8, 2 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ squares from the remaining strip to complete 120
        • If from fat quarters –
          • Cut 18, 2 1/2″ x 18″ strips
            • 4, 2 1/2″ x 18″ strips from each of 3 fat quarters
            • + 3, 2 1/2″ x 18″ strips from the 2 remaining for a total of 18 strips
          • Sub-cut 17 strips into 7, 2 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ squares each for a total of 119 squares
          • Sub-cut 1, 2 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ square from the last strip to complete 120
    • Lights
      • 60, 5″ x 5″ squares for corner patches of blocks
        • If from yardage –
          • Cut 8, 5″ x wof strips
          • Sub-cut 7 strips into 8, 5″ x 5″ squares each for a total of 56 squares
          • Sub-cut 4, 5″ x 5″ squares from the remaining strip to complete 60
        • If from fat quarters –
          • Cut 15, 5″ x 22″ strips
            • 3, 5″ x 22″ strips from each of 5 fat quarters
          • Sub-cut 4, 5″ x 5″ squares from each strip for a total of 60

    • Lattice A
      • 60, 3 1/2″ x 2″ rectangles for edge piece A2
        • Cut 5, 2″ x wof strips
        • Sub-cut strips into 12, 3 1/2″ x 2″ rectangles each for a total of 60 rectangles
      • 60, 6 1/4″ x 2″ rectangles for edge piece B2
        • Cut 3, 6 1/4″ x wof strips
        • Sub-cut 2 strips into 21, 2″ x 6 1/4″ rectangles each for a total of 42 rectangles
        • Cut 18, 2″ x 6 1/4″ rectangles from the remaining strip to complete 60
    • Lattice B
      • 60, 3 1/2″ x 2″ rectangles for edge piece A2
        • Cut 5, 2″ x wof strips
        • Sub-cut strips into 12, 3 1/2″ x 2″ rectangles each for a total of 60 rectangles
      • 60, 6 1/4″ x 2″ rectangles for edge piece B2
        • Cut 3, 6 1/4″ x wof strips
        • Sub-cut 2 strips into 21, 2″ x 6 1/4″ rectangles each for a total of 42 rectangles
        • Cut 18, 2″ x 6 1/4″ rectangles from the remaining strip to complete 60
    • Background
      • 60, 4″ x 4″ squares for corner patches of blocks
        • Cut 6, 4″ x wof strips
        • Sub-cut 10, 4″ x 4″ squares from each strip for a total of 60 squares. 
      • 120, 4 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ rectangles for edge piece A1
        • Cut 8, 4 1/2″ x wof strips
        • Sub-cut 7 strips into 16, 2 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ rectangles each for a total of 112 rectangles
        • Cut 8, 2 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ rectangles from the remaining strip to complete 120
      • 120, 2 1/2″ x 2″ rectangles for edge piece A3
        • Cut 8, 2″ x wof strips
        • Sub-cut 7 strips into 16, 2 1/2″ x 2″ rectangles each for a total of 112 rectangles
        • Cut 8, 2 1/2″ x2″ rectangles from the remaining strip to complete 120
      • 120, 3 1/2″ x 2″ rectangles for edge piece B1 
        • Cut 6, 3 1/2″ x wof strips
        • Sub-cut 5 strips into 21, 2″ x 3 1/2″ rectangles each for a total of 105 rectangles
        • Cut 15, 2″ x 3 1/2″ rectangles from the remaining strip to complete 120
    • Inner Border
      • Cut 8, 1 1/2″ x wof strips
    • Outer Border
      • Cut 8, 5 1/2″ x wof strips
    • Binding
      • Cut 8, 2 1/2″ x wof strips
    • Paper patterns – cut triangles apart just outside the dotted lines.
      Break Time!
          The Whole Valley In a Glass of Wine
      If you just made it through all of that cutting, you really do deserve a break.  Just writing the instructions wore me out.  Put down the rotary cutter for the evening, put your feet up, and enjoy a relaxing beverage….a massage probably wouldn’t hurt either.
      Sewing Directions:
      Corner Patch
      • Corner Patches – Does anyone else think this block looks like an Angry Bird?!  You need to make 120, 4 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ (actual size) patches.
        • Gather baggies containing –
          • 120, 2 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ squares dark fabrics
          • 60, 5″ x 5″ squares light fabrics
          • 60, 4″ x 4″ squares  background fabric
        • When working with triangles, I like to leave things square as long as I can.  Making these patches two at a time accomplished that perfectly.
        • Gather
          • 2, 2 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ squares dark fabric
          • 1, 5″ x 5″ square light fabric
          • 1, 4″ x 4″ square background fabric
        • Sub-cut the 4″ square of background fabric diagonally twice – making 4 small triangles
        • With right sides together, align right angle of 1 small triangle with right angle of small square.
      Corner step 1
        • Sew pieces together.
        • Carefully iron seam allowance towards the triangle.  Be careful not to warp the triangle shape.
        • With right sides together, align right angle of second small triangle with opposite right angle of small square so that the “bunny ears” intersect.
      Corner step 2
        • Sew pieces together.
        • Carefully iron seam allowance towards the triangle.  Be careful not to warp the triangle shape.
        • You should now have a large triangle made of three pieces.
        • Sub-cut 5″ x 5″ square light fabric diagonally, once – making two large triangles.
        • With right sides together, center pieced triangle on top of large triangle, aligning the hypotenuses.  Note – the pieced triangle is a little bit smaller than the large one.  It is supposed to be this way.
      Corner step 3
        • Iron seam allowance towards the large triangle.  Be careful not to warp the triangle shape.
        • Trim patch to 4 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ square.
        • Repeat with remaining pieces to make a second patch.
        • Repeat 59 more times to make required 120 corner patches.
      Left Reaching Edge Patch
      • Edge Patches – This patch looks like a  Y to me.  You need to make 60 Right facing and 60 left facing, 4 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ (actual size) patches.
        • Gather
          • Lattice A fabric
            • 60, 3 1/2″ x 2″ rectangles for edge piece A2
            • 60, 6 1/4″ x 2″ rectangles for edge piece B2
          • Lattice B fabric
            • 60, 3 1/2″ x 2″ rectangles for edge piece A2
            • 60, 6 1/4″ x 2″ rectangles for edge piece B2
          • Background fabric
            • 120, 4 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ rectangles for edge piece A1
            • 120, 2 1/2″ x 2″ rectangles for edge piece A3
            • 120, 3 1/2″ x 2″ rectangles for edge piece B1 
          • Paper foundation patterns
            • 60, right reaching
            • 60, left reaching
        • Use instructions in Paper Piecing tutorial to complete 120 edge patches.  I highly recommend that you keep your left reaching and your right reaching patches in separate piles.
        • NOTE: 
          •  You can easily tell a right reaching from a left reaching by setting the block in front of you with the largest triangle closest to you.  Thus situated, look at the long arm of the Y.  It reaches up and to the ______.
          • Paper Piecing is done “upside down”  do not worry if your left blocks look like right blocks and your right blocks look like left blocks.  As long as the group called left all look like each other and different from the group called right you are doing okay.
      • Blocks
        • Use the pictures for each block
        • Make one block at a time.
        • Lay your patches out in front of you and make sure that…
          • The largest triangle in the edge patch always touches the center patch.
          • The Lattice fabrics appear to continue through the block.  It kind of looks like four sticks arranged end to edge to create a large square on point.  The opposite sides of this square are the same color.
          • If the lattice sticks look broken, or you can’t get them to line up correctly, you probably have a mixture of left and right reaching edge patches.
          • The small dark squares always touch the large dark square in their interior corners.
      Right Reaching Block
        •  15, Right Reaching
          • Gather
            • 15, 4 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ squares dark fabric
            • 60, corner patches
            • 60, right reaching edge patches
          • Use tips outlined above to construct 15 blocks
          • Trim blocks to 12 1/2″ x 12 1/2″

      

      Left Reaching Block
        • 15, Left Reaching
          • Gather
            • 15, 4 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ squares dark fabric
            • 60, corner patches
            • 60, left reaching edge patches
          • Use tips outlined above to construct 15 blocks
          • Trim blocks to 12 1/2″ x 12 1/2″

      • The Top
        • Center
          • Gather
            • 15 Right Reaching Blocks
            • 15 Left Reaching Blocks
          • On a design wall (Read shower  curtain, large bed, floor if you do not have a formal design wall.  Really, these things work just as well, if not a little more awkwardly.) arrange you blocks.
            • Rows 1, 3, and 5 are all Right, Left, Right, Left, Right
            • Rows 2, 4, and 6 are all Left, Right, Left, Right, Left
            • All blocks are arranged so that Lattice A and Lattice B fabrics are oriented the same way.  In my picture you can see, all of the yellow sticks are on top and bottom of the blocks and the grey sticks are left and right.  Yours should be this way too.
            • If you are having a hard time getting the lattice to line up correctly you probably have the wrong kind of block.  Make sure the block is reaching in a different direction than the one you are placing it next to.  It is easy to do this by laying the blocks on top of each other.  You can’t miss the differences this way.
          • Sew blocks into rows.
          • Iron seam allowances towards the right reaching blocks
          • Sew rows together to complete center. 
          • It should measure 60 1/2″ x 72 1/2″.
        • Inner Border
          • Gather
            • 60 1/2″ x 72 1/2″ center
            • 8, 1 1/2″ x wof strips of inner border fabric
          • Sew 4, sets of 2, wof strips together skinny end to skinny end.
          • Iron seam allowance open.
          • Sew long skinny strip to top and bottom of center 
          • Iron seam allowances towards the inner border
          • Trim excess
          • Sew long skinny strip to each side of center
          • Iron seam allowances towards the inner border
          • Trim excess
          • Your top should now measure 62 1/2″ x 74 1/2″
        • Outer Border
          • Gather
            • 62 1/2″ x 74 1/2″ center
            • Cut 8, 5 1/2″ x wof strips outer border fabric
          • Sew 4, sets of 2, wof strips together skinny end to skinny end.
          • Iron seam allowance open.
          • Sew long skinny strip to top and bottom of center 
          • Iron seam allowances towards the outer border
          • Trim excess
          • Sew long skinny strip to each side of center
          • Iron seam allowances towards the outer border
          • Trim excess
          • Your top should now measure 72 1/2″ x 84 1/2″
      • Layer and quilt as desired.  I used a pattern called Chantilly Lace by Anne Bright with Praline thread by Signature.
      I’d love to see your finished quilt.  Please send me a picture, or add it yourself to my Tops to Treasures group on Flickr.

      A 72″ x 84″ quilt to be proud of.  This one will knock your socks off when it is finished.

      Cindy Sharp
      {topstotreasures.blogspot.com}

      Don’t forget the Paper foundation patterns
       .

      Bedazzled Quilt




      As I am preparing this pattern for publication much of the United States of America is frozen. There are even rumors to the effect that Niagara Falls has frozen. That’s cold. The next couple of months is bound to be filled with stories of cold and more cold as we nestle in for winter. However, that doesn’t mean we have to be cold or gloomy in the wet and grey.

      Where I live, in North Texas, it doesn’t usually get very cold for very long. Our winters last a week here and a week there, buffeting us with cold winds and overly bright sunshine. Even so there are often long stretches of gray wet days. This quilt will keep me smiling well into spring.

      Me and My Sister’s latest line “Hubba Hubba” is the perfect remedy for a cold wet winter. Their cheerful pallet and designs are guaranteed to make me giggle and set me to dreaming about spring. Arranged in a happy rainbow and pieced into twinkling off set stars this quilt is perfect for an evening of silly movies and pop corn.


      Focus Fabrics

      • 25 fat quarters – 5 each of 5 colorways (Hubba Hubba by Me & My Sister) 

      Supporting Fabrics

      • 2¾ yards background & inner border fabric (Bella White | 9900-97) 
      • 1 yard dominant solid (one sashing stripe and binding) (Bella Amelia Blue | 9900-167) 
      • 3 – ¼ yard cuts for sashing stripes (Bella Solids Kiwi | 9900-189, Bermuda | 9900-269, and Yellow | 9900-024) 
      • 4½ yards backing (Tiny Daises in Blue | 22216-16)
      • Miscellaneous fat quarters from bundle for pieced outer border

      Supplies

      • 25 large sandwich-sized zip lock baggies – will make it easier to keep your gazillion pieces organized
      • Sand paper – I used a 3 2/3″ x 9″ sheet of fine grade paper that I stole from my husband’s stash in the garage. Place your pieces on top of it when drawing sewing lines, the fabric will not move.

       
      Bedazzled is made from a total of 25 10″ finished blocks (they actually measure 10½” x 10½” before you sew them into your quilt), set in a 5 x 5 grid with sashing on two sides. The sashing is offset from row to row to create a twinkling effect. For added twinkle I’ve sorted the focus fabric line by colors and highlighted them with random negative blocks. What can be better than candy colored rainbows of stars?!

      NOTE: WOF = width of fabric

      CUTTING
      From background fabric, cut:

      • 9 strips measuring 3″ x WOF; subcut into 116 – 3″ x 3″ squares
      • 2 strips measuring 10½” x WOF
        • From 1 strip cut 14 – 3″ x 10½” rectangles
        • From the 2nd strip, cut an additional 11 –  3″ x 10½” rectangles
        • From the remnant of the 2nd strip, cut 4 – 5½” x 5½” squares
      • 6 strips measuring 5½” x WOF
        • From 5 strips, cut into 14 – 3″ x 5½” rectangles (total of 70 rectangles)
        • From the 6th strip, cut an additional 6 – 3″ x 5½” rectangles (for a total of 76 rectangles)
        • From the remnant of the 6th strip, cut 1 – 5½” x 5½” square
      • Set aside remaining background fabric for the inner border. You will need 8 WOF strips but you will need to have the blocks pieced and assembled so you can calculate the dimensions. I will walk you through this step below. 

       From 25 fat quarters (FQs):

      • Select one FQ from each of the 5 colorways to be a negative block. These fabrics will become backgrounds instead of stars. From each of these negative FQs, cut:
        • 4 – 3″ x 3″ squares
        • 4 – 3″ x 5½” rectangles
      • From each of the remaining 20 FQs, cut:
        • 1 – 5½” x 5½” square 
        • 8 – 3″ x 3″ squares 
      • Select a 26th FQ that is more more like your initial background fabric, but not solid. From this FQ, cut:
        • 4 – 3″ x 3″ squares 
        • 4 – 3″ x 5½”” rectangles 
        • 1 – 3″ x 10½” rectangle (for 1/4 sashing on one block) 

      From remaining (and randomly chosen) FQs, cut:

      • 60 – 5½” x 5½” squares for the pieced outer border

        From each of the sashing solids, cut:

        • 2 strips measuring 3″ x WOF (a total of 8 strips)

        From binding fabric, cut:

        • 8 strips measuring 2½” x WOF

          Break time. Really, if you have just cut all of those pieces out it is time to take a break. Pour yourself a glass of something cool and sparkling, take a walk in the fresh air, clear your mind. That is where I am headed right now….and I haven’t even cut out the fabric yet, I just wrote about it.

          PIECING

          • Block kits
            • The directions are written as if you were making one block at a time.  When I want my projects to be more unified (less scrappy) I make them this way.  It is easier to keep all of the same colors together.  If you want a more scrappy project make all of the flying goose units at the same time, randomly selecting squares and rectangles.
            • It might be helpful to sort your stacks of fabric into block kits containing the following pieces
              • 1, 5 1/2″ x 5 1/2″ square for star center
              • 4, 3″ x 5 1/2″ rectangles background for edges
              • 4, 3″ x 3″ squares background for corners
              • 8, 3″ x 3″ squares for  star points
              • 1, 3″ x 10 1/2″ rectangles for 1/4 sashing
            •  Not all of the backgrounds are the same color.  Your sets should break down as follows
              • 5 kits
                • stars pieces cut from regular background fabric
                • backgrounds are cut from fqs
                • 1/4 sashing cut from regular background fabric
              • 19 kits
                • stars cut from fqs
                • background pieces are cut from the regular background
                • 1/4 sashing cut from regular background fabric
              • 1 kit
                • star pieces are cut from a fq
                • background pieces are cut from a fq
                • 1/4 sashing cut from fq
          • Block construction
            • The blocks in this quilt finish at 10″ square.  (10 1/2″ x 10 1/2″ actual before sewn into the top)
            • Each block is made from 4 flying goose units, 4 small square patches, and 1 large square patch.
            • Before you call the block done you will also add sashing to 1/4 of it.
            • For each of the 25 kits you need to complete the following steps  (Yes, I have recycled the pictures from another bakeshop project that I did.  The blocks are constructed the same way as the blocks in Midwinter Cozy.  They are however, larger.  The fabrics pictured in the diagrams are from Midwinter Reds by Minick and Simpson)
          • Flying Goose Units
            • Gather from kit
              • 8, 3″ x 3″ squares
              • 4, 3″ x 5 1/2″ rectangles
            • Draw a diagonal line on the wrong side of each 3″ square (Get out the sand paper.  Place your fabric wrong side up on top of the paper.  The sandy grit will keep your piece from moving as you draw on it.)
            • With right sides together align one square atop one rectangle.
            • Sew along the line but just to the outside. (on the side toward the smallest part of the rectangle
            • Iron flap open – pushing the triangle lying over the larger part of the rectangle up and over the seam.
            • Trim the excess fabric from the back of the patch, or leave it there to help your patch keep it’s shape.  The choice is yours.
            • You now have a rectangle with one corner different.
            • Repeat the process on the opposite side of triangle.
            • Be careful to get the seam going in the right direction.  It should be perpendicular to the seam you already made.
            • Trim unit back to 3″ x 5 1/2″ rectangle
            • Again, you choose to trim the seam allowances or not.
            • Repeat 3 times for a total of 4 units.
          • Block
            • Gather
              • 4 flying goose units
              • 4, 3″ x 3″ background squares
              • 1,5 1/2″ x 5 1/2″ star square
            • Sew Rows
              • Top and bottom
                • Sew patches together as shown
                • Iron seam allowances towards the background squares
              • Center
                • Sew patches together as shown
          
                • Iron seam allowances towards the center
              • Sew rows together to form square.
              • Iron seam allowances away from the center block
                • NOTE: If you chose to not to trim the extra fabric from your goose units you will need to clip the seams to make them lie flat.  Clip the seam allowance ONLY, at the 4 intersections.  This will allow you to iron the bulky seam allowances to remain flat.  They will fall away from the goose units.)
              • Trim final block to 10 1/2″ x 10 1/2″
            • Add the 1/4 sashing piece, 3″ x 10 1/2″  to one side of the block
            • Iron seam allowance towards the sashing
            • Repeat process 24 more times for 25 blocks.
          • The top
            • Rows
              • Gather
                • 25, 10 1/2″ x 12 1/2″ blocks (5 in each color way)
              • Arrange blocks.
                • This is where a design wall comes in handy.  If you don’t have one, no worries, I don’t have one either (no walls in my studio…really).  You can use the floor, or your bed, or even the curtain on your shower.  You just need a place where you can lay out your pieces.
                • Once you are satisfied with the layout take a quick picture with your phone.  This will do two things for you
                  • It will help you remember where the pieces go.  AND
                  • It will give you a different perspective – one last peak at the arrangment to make sure you like it.
                • The blocks should be arranged in 5 rows of 5 with all of the same colorway in the same row.
                • Alternate rows should have alternate the side of the block where the 1/4 sashing is.
                • If your rows differ in length – they shouldn’t, but sometimes things happen – you can trim them to equal lengths.  Do this on the  1/4 sashing end of the row.  (The stars are supposed to be offset, no one is going to notice if an end 1/4 sashing is slightly smaller.) 
                • Sew blocks together to make rows
                • Iron seam allowances towards the 1/4 sashing.
          • Sashing
            • Gather 
              • 5 rows with 5 blocks each
              • 8 – 3″ x WOF strips from solids (2 of each color)
            • Sew solid strips together in matching sets.
            • Iron seam allowances open
            • Sew solids rows between pieced rows.
            • Irons seam allowances towards the solid rows.
          • Inner Border
            • The purpose of this inner border is to make the pieced outer border fit the pieced center.
            • The exact dimensions of the border will vary a little bit from one sewist to another.
            • Record the length and width of your top below.
              • Length = ___________  (mine was 60″) b
              • Width = ___________   (mine was 61 1/2″) a
          • Outer Border
            • Gather 60, 5 1/2″ x 5 1/2″ squares
            • Randomly sew 4 sets of blocks
              • 2 rows of 14
              • 2 rows of 16
            • Irons seam allowances open.
            • Record the length of each row
              • 14 block row =  _____________ (mine was 64) A
              • 16 block row =  _____________ (mine was 72 1/2″) B
          • Inner Border
            • The finished width of the inner border needs to be the difference between the length one side of the top and the corresponding length of the outer border, divided by 2 (because we want it evenly spaced on two sides of the quilt).  Add 1/2″ to this number to get the width you need to cut your strips. 
          • Please don’t be turned off …. this is easy math… you can do it.
          • For the short side (labeled A and a in the picture) you need to figure out x.
            • NOTE: A does NOT include the corner squares.  This is the short side of the quilt.
            • A – a = x = the finished width of this strip
              • mine was 64 – 61.5 = 2.5
            • (x/2)+ .5″ = the width to cut your inner border
              • mine was 2.5 / 2 + .5 = 1.25 +.5 = 1.75″
            • Cut 4 strips this wide x WOF
          • For the long side (labeled B and b in the picture) you need to figure out y.
            • B does include the corner squares.  They are already attached to your strip, but they do not effect the width needed for your inner border.  Subtract 9.5″ from B.
            • (B – 9.5″) – b = y = the finished width of this strip
              • mine was (72.5 – 9.5) – 60 = 3
            • (y/2) + .5″= the width to cut your inner border
              • mine was 3/2 + .5 = 1.5 + .5 = 2″
            • Cut 4 strips this wide x WOF
          • If you have any trouble figuring this out for your quilt please contact me.  I would be glad to help you.
          • Attach inner borders
            • Short sides first.
            • Iron seam allowances towards the inner border
          • Attach outer borders
            • Short sides first
            • Iron seam allowances towards the inner borders.
          • Layer and quilt as desired.


            One super fun quilted throw measuring approximately 71″ x 73″.

            It is the perfect place to sit and gather giggles with your favorite girl. I’d love to see your finished quilt. Please send me a picture, or add it to the Tops to Treasures flickr group.

            Cindy Sharp
            {topstotreasures.blogspot.com}

            Midwinter Cozy Quilt


            Red is the color of toy wagons and rubber balls.  It is the color of roses and fire trucks.  These things are always red in my mind.  Even so, there is room in my mind for wagons, rubber balls, roses, and fire trucks of other colors.  However, when winter rolls around and the days get long and dark I always reach for my red sweater.  Midwinter Reds by Minick and Simpson packs all of the warmth and spirit of my favorite red sweater into a fabric line.  It fills my heart with memories of cold days and warm ginger bread, with visions of hearth and home.  It is a natural for this tiny quilt/toy/table topper.  I hope you home is filled with all of the warmth and joy that midwinter red has to offer.

            Midwinter Cozy

            • Stars and Backgrounds
              • 8, 2 1/2″ Candy Charm Packs + 1, 5″ Charm Pack for a very scrappy look
              • OR 1 layer cake
            • Inner Border & Binding
              • 1/2 yard (I used tone on tone paisley in red SKU#14766-13)
            • Outer Border
              • 1/2 yard (I used red floral on tan, SKU #14761-16)
            • Backing
              • 1 yard (I used red dots on tan, SKU14767-16)

            Cutting Directions:
            • Stars – If you are using a layer cake rather than the charm packs you can cut all of the required pieces from 1, 10″ x 10″ square.
              • cut 12 sets of
                • 8, 2 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ squares (if not taken one each from the candy charm packs) for points.
                • 1, 4 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ square (from matching 5″ charm) for centers.
            • Backgrounds – using either 3, 5″ charms or 1 layer cake square
              • cut 12 sets of
                • 4, 2 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ rectangles for edges.
                • 4, 2 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ squares for corners.
            • Borders
              • Inner
                • cut 4, 1″ x width of fabric (wof) strips
              • Outer
                • cut 4, 3″ x wof strips
            • Binding
              • cut 4, 2 1/2″ x wof strips

            Sewing Directions:
            The directions are written as if you were making one block at a time.  When I want my projects to be more unified (less scrappy) I make them this way.  It is easier to keep all of the same colors together.  If you want a more scrappy project make all of the flying goose units at the same time, randomly selecting squares and rectangles.
            • Flying Goose Units
              • Gather
                • 8, 2 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ squares
                • 4, 2 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ rectangles
              • Draw a diagonal line on the wrong side of each 2 1/2″ square
              • With right sides together align one square atop one rectangle.
              • Sew along the line but just to the outside. (on the side toward the smallest part of the rectangle
              • Iron flap open – pushing the triangle lying over the larger part of the rectangle up and over the seam.
              • At this point you can trim the excess fabric from the back of the patch; however, I leave mine in.  It gives me a little more control over the bias edge that tend to make triangles warp, and it make the points stick out just a little more in the finished product.
              • You now have a rectangle with one corner different.
              • Repeat the process on the opposite side of triangle.
              • Be careful to get the seam going in the right direction.  It should be perpendicular to the seam you already made.
              • Trim unit back to 2 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ rectangle
              • Again, you choose to trim the seam allowances or not.
              • Repeat 3 times for a total of 4 units.
            • Block
              • Gather
                • 4 flying goose units
                • 4, 2 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ background squares
                • 1, 4 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ star square
              • Sew Rows
                • Top and bottom
                  • Sew patches together as shown
                  • Iron seam allowances towards the background squares
                • Center
                  • Sew patches together as shown
            
            
                  • Iron seam allowances towards the center
              • Sew rows together to form square.
              • Iron seam allowances away from the center block.  This will require a good deal of steam if you left the extra fabric on the goose patches.
              • Trim final block to 8 1/2″ x 8 1/2″
            • Make 12 blocks
            • The Quilt
              • Gather
                • 12, 8 1/2″ x 8 1/2″ star blocks
                • inner border – 4, 1″ x wof
                • outer border – 4, 3″ x wof
              • Arrange blocks in a 4 x 3 grid to your liking.
              • Sew 3 sets of 4 blocks together to make rows
              • Sew rows together to make center of top.
              • Sew inner border strips on long edges.
              • Iron seam allowances towards the border
              • Sew inner border strips on short edges
              • Irons seam allowances towards the border
              • Repeat border process with outer border.
              • Layer and quilt as desired.


            One super cute little quilt for doll or baby.  This quilt is also sized nicely to fit on a coffee or end table.  Alter the arrangement of blocks to a 2 x 6 grid and create a sweet holiday runner.

             Food for thought –  This block was designed to be used with candy charm sized pieces.  You used them to make the points of the stars in the flying goose units, and the corner background pieces.  You could also use them to make the rest of the block.
            Sew 2 candy charms together to make 1, 2 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ rectangle.  This is the size of the foundation rectangle for the flying goose unit.
            Sew 4 candy charms together to make 1, 4 1/2″ x 4 1/2″ square.  Perfect for the center of these stars!
            Check out the block I made with 24 candy charm squares and the scraps from my inner border.  To do the same you need 12 light squares and 12 dark squares.  Depending on the fabric line (not all lines have the same number of dark and light fabrics in them) you could make 2 blocks per candy charm pack.  OR, go with a regular sized charm pack and you have the makings of 8 blocks.  OR go with a layer cake and you can make 32 blocks.  I think I would love to see that quilt!
            This is a picture collage made on PicMonkey.
              Imagine how cool it would look with 16 different blocks!
            No matter what version of this pattern you use, or what fabric line, I ‘d love to see it.  Please add a picture to the Tops to Treasures Flickr group, or send me your photo.  I would be glad to add it for you.

            Cindy Sharp
            {www.topstotreasures.blogspot.com}

            S’more Mountains Jelly Roll Quilt



            Hello!  I’m so glad to be here with you today. Camping has a special spot in my heart.  My Dad designed camps for a living.  Yup, there is someone who gets paid to do that job….or there used to be.  Dad designed camps all over the USA for the Boy Scouts of America, the Girl Scouts, and the Presbyterian Church.  If there is a spot in our great country near and dear to your heart my dad could tell you all about it…intimately.  That was his super power!  When I introduced him to my husband, years ago before G was even my fiancé, Dad knew where his folks lived….literally.  He could describe the house and the yard.  He had been past it a hundred times on his way into the Sierra Nevada National Park…en route to one camp or another.  It tickles me pink to know that he had such a profound influence on people.  It is like having a little bit of my daddy with me every where I go.

            S’more Love, by Eric and Julie Comstock is perfect for making a quilt to enjoy by the camp fire…or to enjoy in your RV… or living room long after the trip is over.  It would look great in a little boy’s bedroom.  The line is filled with whimsical characters and vibrant colors.

            • 1 Jelly Roll
              • I used S’more Love + 4 2 1/2″ x width of fabric (wof) strips
            • 1 1/4 yards dark fabric for distant mountains and inner border
              • I used Bella Chocolate #9900-41
            • 1  yards light fabric for distant sky
              • I used Bella Feather #9900-127
            • 1/4 yard for corner stones
              • I used Campfire star bursts #37075-13
            • 2 yards for outer border
              • Yardage is required for fussy cutting the stripes in S’more Love
              • I used Multi stripe #37070-11
              • If you do not fussy cut you only need 3/4 yard
            •  1/2 yard for binding
              • I used Campfire star bursts #37075-13
            • 4 yards for backing
              • I used Aspen green with cars on it #37071-14
            • Various scraps for applique
              • I used scraps of Home Town by Sweetwater, and Pezzy by American Jane 

              Helpful tools:

              • 9 1/2″ square quilting ruler.

              • 6, 3/4″ diameter buttons to use as tires for applique trucks and campers.

              This quilt is made from 42, 9″ finished blocks – two sets of 21 each.

              Cutting Directions:

              • From Dark Mountains fabric
                • Cut 11, 10 1/4″x 10 1/4″ squares (for distant mountains)
                  • Cut 3, 10 1/4″x width of fabric (wof) strips
                  • Sub cut  wof strips into 4, 10 1/4″x 10 1/4″ squares each for 12 squares
                • Cut 7, 1 1/2″x wof (for inner border)
              • From Light Sky fabric
                • Cut 11, 10 1/4″x 10 1/4″ squares (for distant sky)
                  • Cut 3, 10 1/4″x width of fabric (wof) strips
                  • Sub cut wof strips into 4, 10 1/4″x 10 1/4″ squares each for 12 squares
              • From Corner Stone fabric
                • Cut 4, 4″x 4″ squares (for corner stones)
                • Cut 2, 2 1/2″ x wof (to supplement jelly roll strips)
              • From Outer Border fabric
                • If fussy cutting –
                  • Cut 2, 4″x 65 1/2″ strips along length of pattern
                  • Cut 2, 4″x 56 1/2″ strips along length of pattern
                  • from fussy cutting scraps
                    • Cut 2, 2 1/2″ x 42″ strips to supplement jelly roll
                • If NOT fussy cutting –
                  • Cut 6, 4″ x wof strips
                  • cut 2, 2 1/2″ x wof strips
              • From binding fabric
                • Cut 7, 2 1/2″ x wof strips

              • Tips for working with Jelly Rolls:
                • Run a lint brush over the raw edged sides of the jelly roll before unwrapping it, otherwise you will have little fluffy lint fuzzes all over the place.
                • Iron strips flat before sewing.
                • GET STEAMED!!  It will help to realign the fibers is you use steam when you iron.  They will relax and loose the curl that has been forced into them by being rolled up

               

              Sewing Directions:
              LARGE STRIPED TRIANGLES:

              • From jelly roll (+ 4, 2 1/2″ x wof strips cut from corner stone and outer border fabrics)
                • Randomly sew 11 sets of 4 strips together along the long edge
                • Iron seam allowances open
                  • To open seam allowances place the sewn strip on a hard surface (like a cutting table or desk)  Spread the larger pieces of fabric to the sides, right side down, then use your finger nail to nudge the seam allowances apart.  The  use STEAM to set the seams open.
                • Each strip set should measure approximately 42″ x 8 1/2″
                • Using the lines on your ruler cut 45 degrees from the corner of the first strip set.
                • Turn ruler over and make second cut on strip set at 45 degrees from the last edge cut.
                • Continue in this manner across set for 4 large right triangles per set
                • Because you will be working with biased edges the pieces will have a tendency to stretch.  Do the best that you can to keep things square, but don’t worry too much about it.  These triangles are large enough to be squared up when you get to the final step of block construction. 
                • Repeat process with remaining strip sets for a total of 44 large right triangles.
                • NOTE: As you only need 42, you will have two extras.

              MOUNTAIN BLOCKS:

              Mountain Block, Right Facing – make 21
              NOTE – This is a drawing.  In an actual block the striped pieces may be different widths.
              Mountain Block, Left Facing – make 21
              NOTE – This is a drawing.  In an actual block the striped pieces may be different widths.

              • Gather
                • 11, dark 10 1/4″x 10 1/4″ squares
                • 11, light 10 1/4″x 10 1/4″ squares
                • 42 large, striped right triangles
              • Make 21 half square triangles (HST)
                • Draw a line diagonally across the wrong side of each light 10 1/4″x 10 1/4″ square
                • Align one light square atop one dark square with right sides together
                • Sew 1/4″ to each side of the drawn line
                • Cut on line to make 2 HST
                • Iron seam allowances open.
                • Cut each HST in half diagonally, perpendicular to the seam to make 2 right triangles each (mirror images of each other)
                • Repeat process with remaining squares, but do not cut the last HST in half for 42 bi-colored large triangles.
              • Sew one striped triangle to one bi-colored triangle
                • The striped triangles will be bigger than the bi-colored triangles.  I did this on purpose so that the cutting would be easier.  I found trimming after the weird blocks were made more accurate than trimming stretchy triangles.
                • Align the triangles along the hypotenuse (the side opposite the right angle), with right sides together, pin!
                • Sew along the hypotenuse to make one large square-ish shape. 
              • Iron seam allowances towards the striped triangle.
              • Trim to 9 1/2″ x 9 1/2″ square – be sure to keep the center of the square where the hypotenuse and the seam of the bi-colored triangle meet.
              • Repeat with remaining triangles for 42 blocks.


              Assemble Center of Quilt:

              • Gather 42 Mountain blocks
                • 21 right facing
                • 21 left facing
              • Arrange 7 rows of 6 blocks each
                • 3 rows – left, right, left, right, left, right – notice how they make 3 striped peaks
                • 4 rows – right, left, right, left, right, left –  only two striped peaks here
              • Sew blocks together ironing seam allowances towards the left facing block
              • Sew rows together
                • It will help to keep your quilt square if you
                  • Pin the rows together, making sure that the seams from each row line up with the seams to the next.
                  • Sew the rows together with the white (sky fabric) on the top.  It is cut with the weave of the fabric and will not stretch as much as the edge of the striped mountains.
                • Start with a right left right row
                • Alternate rows
                • End with a right left right row

              Add Borders:

              • Gather
                • Center of quilt
                • 7, 1 1/2″x wof (for inner border)
                • 4, 4″ x 4″ corner stones
                • Outer border strips
              • Inner Borders
                • Sew 2 sets of 2, 1 1/2″ strips together along the short side.
                • Iron seam allowance open
                • Attach to long sides of quilt top.
                • Iron seam allowance toward the border.
                • Trim excess.
                • Sew remaining strips together, along the short sides, to make 2 pieces long enough to fit short ends of your quilt top.
                • Attach to the short sides of quilt top.
                • Iron seam allowances towards the border.
                • Trim excess.
              • Outer Borders
                • Measure the sides of your quilt top – record below
                  • ________ top (short)
                  • ________ bottom (short)
                  • ________ left (long)
                  • ________ right (long)
                • Cut 2 strips to fit the left and right sides as recorded above.
                • Attach to quilt top
                • Iron seam allowances towards the outer border
                • Cut remaining strips to fit the top and bottom as recorded above.  (Remember you are going to add a corner stone in the next step…your strip will be shorter than the edge of your quilt at the moment.)
                • Add corner stones to the ends of each strip.
                • Iron seam allowances towards the strip.
                • PIN strip to top, right sides together,  matching up seam at corner stones with seam of long borders.
                • Sew in place.
                • Iron seam allowances towards the outer border.
                • Repeat process for bottom edge.
              Your top will look something like this now. 



              Add Applique:

              This is totally optional.  The mountains do not need the applique to be a finished quilt.  Look at the picture above.  I think the quilt would be perfect just like this.  However, I wanted to play with the fun characters in S’more Love

              I found some wonderful drawings on Moda’s swatch pages for this line.   I cut and pasted and enlarged the images until I got what I wanted, then turned them into an applique. 

              I added a little bit of dimension by adding an extra piece of batting between the appliqued pieces and the core of the quilt.  (This is an old technique called Trapunto)  I like the way it makes my cars and RVs pop.
              

              Finish Quilt:  Layer and Quilt as desired.


              A perfect spot to dream about the next camping trip – 63″x 72″ big enough to cover a camping cot, or the skinny pull out bed in your RV. 

              I quilted mine in Vickie Malaski’s Animal Tracks pattern.

              I’d love to see your quilts.  Please share a photo of your finished quilt with my group, Tops to Treasures on Flickr.

              Cindy Sharp
              {topstotreasures.blogspot.com}