Beach Umbrella Quilt

Hello everyone! I’m Becky from Patchwork Posse. Today I am sharing the quilt pattern for a cute and beachy umbrella quilt. During the summer I find that a little bit of shade goes a long way! These umbrellas are all about giving you a place to hide away from the heat. The fun contrast in the Weeds fabric collection with red, blacks, and grays is perfect for showcasing the fun print on the umbrella. Even though there is curved piecing in this quilt, once you get the hang of it, you can quickly sew all the blocks together. The key is pinning. You will be using pins. A lot of them. If you notice one umbrella is facing the wrong way….I did this on purpose. You don’t have to do that if you don’t like. I find it fun to add something a little ‘off’ in quilts.

  • 5 to 10 fat quarters in red for the umbrellas
  • 5 to 10 fat quarters in gray for the block backgrounds
  • ½ yard fabric for spacer blocks (I used a light gray on dark gray polka dot); cut into (12) 7″ squares
  • 1½ yards of red ric rac for umbrella handles; cut into (13) 4″ pieces
  • Coordinating thread for top-stitching the ric rac
  • ¼ yard red fabric for 1st border; cut into (2) 2″ x 32″strips and (2) 2″ x 35″
  • 4 to 5 gray fat quarters for 2nd border; cut into (60) 2″ x  9″ strips
  • 1 fat quarter for cornerstones; cut into (4) 4″ squares
  • {Beach Umbrella Quilt template at the end of the Printer Friendly file}

(1) Cut out the umbrella pieces using the {templates}. Make sure you pay attention to the grain line arrow on the template. This will help keep the curves on the bias which will be a lot easier to sew. I used red for the umbrella parts and the dark gray and black for the background. Notice that section D is the bottom of the block and where you will be sewing the ric rac handle. NOTE: when cutting your fabric make sure you ADD 1/4″ to each. If you don’t, your blocks will be too small.

(2) Pin the center of piece A to the center of piece B- the will be curved in different directions.


(3) Pin the ends of the pieces together.


(4) Sew across this edge, stopping every few stitches and easing the edges together. When you get to the center, leave your needle down and adjust the rest of the piece.

(5) Using this method, continue sewing pieces C and then piece D to make your block. This is what the back of the block will look like:

Front of the block:

(6) Press the block.

(7) Repeat steps (1) through (6) to make a total of 13 umbrella blocks

(8) Pin the ric rac in place and sew down the center of it using matching thread. Tuck the ends under to make it look more finished.

(9) Taking your spacing blocks and your umbrella blocks, sew 3 rows:

(10) Taking your spacing blocks and your umbrella blocks, sew 2 rows:

(11) Sew your rows together to make the quilt center.

(12) Attach the first (red) border to the top and bottom (shorter strips). Attach the longer strips to the sides.

(13) Create the gray pieced border:

  • Sew (6) 2″ x 9″ strips together. Square up to 9″. 

  •  Cut from corner to corner twice to make 4 triangles. 

  • Sew the triangles together. Notice that the strips will be going different directions. You can choose if you want them to miter or go the same direction. The point will go past the other piece by a little bit. That is what you want to happen. In the example, I chose to keep them all going the same direction. The strips will NOT line up. Don’t go crazy trying to make that happen. 

  • Sew additional triangles together until you have 4 borders with 9 triangles in each. 

  • The ends will have a point and aren’t quite long enough. You will need to unpick one end of the row. 
  • Sew the extra triangles to the ends of the rows to get them to the correct length and to make them square on the ends. The 4 border pieces should be 35″ long each. 

(14 )Pin the border to the quilt center and sew to the top and bottom of the quilt.

(15) Sew the 4 squares to the ends of the other 2 pieced border rows and sew these rows to the sides of the quilt.

(16) Layer, baste, quilt, and bind.

Above is a close-up of the quilting I chose. Feel free to do whatever quilting pattern you would like.

Finished Quilt Block: 7″ x 7″
Finished Quilt: 42″ x 42″

For more quilt tutorials and easy sewing projects, stop by {} or follow me on {Facebook}. You can also find me on {Pinterest}. Hope you enjoy this quilt!

Becky Jorgensen

Turkey Tracks Quilt

Hello everyone! I’m Becky from Patchwork Posse.  Today I am going to show you how to sew up the Turkey Tracks Lap Quilt Top. I love quilts….especially lap sized ones.  They don’t take as long to sew up, are great for gifts, and are handy to have around the house for a quick snuggle and use.

Great for any time or season.  Bright colors and prints would also work great.  Just make sure that your dark and medium fabrics are contrasting enough- so the blocks stand out and don’t get lost. 
This quilt is a bit tricky, but I will show you a quick piecing technique for the flying geese to speed up your construction time.

1/2 yard- dark fabric
2 yard- background
1 1/4 yard- green
3/4 yard- red
various fabric scraps for the piano keys border- 5″ X 2 1/2″ –92

Dark Blocks~
36– 4 1/2″ X 4 1/2″ dark
36– 2 1/2″  X 2 1/2″ background
36– 2 1/2″ X 2 1/2″ background- corners of blocks
Flying Geese Blocks~
36– 5 1/2″ X 5 1/2″ background
108– 3″ X 3″ green
9–  Red 2 1/2″ X 2 1/2″ squares
36– 6 1/2″ X 2 1/2″ background
2– 2″ X 43″
2– 2″ X 47″
Piano Keys:
92– 5″ X 2 1/2″ vairous fabrics
4– 5″ x 5″ corners- green

Dark Block:
Draw a line from corner to corner on the wrong side of the 2 1/2″ square
1)  Place the small background 2 1/2″ square right sides on one corner of the 4 1/2″ dark square
2)  Sew on drawn line, cut off remainder triangle and iron

Flying Geese Blocks:
Draw a line from corner to corner on the wrong side of the 2 1/2″ squares
1)  Place the 2 1/2″ squares at opposite corners of the background square
2)  Sew on either side of the drawn line
3)  Cut on drawn line and iron
4)  Place a 2 1/2″ square in the last corner of the background
5)  Sew on either side of the drawn line
6)  Cut on drawn line and iron
Square these to 4 1/2″ X 2 1/2″

1)  Sew 6 1/2″ X 2 1/2″ on either side of a red 2 1/2″ square
Repeat for a total of 9
Set aside the remainder background pieces- will be used later

Piano Keys:
1)  Sew 23 keys (5″ X 2 1/2′ ) side by side
2)  Repeat for a total of 4
3)  Sew the corner 5″ X 5″ squares to either ends of 2 sets- set aside

Block construction:
1)  Sew single flying geese to the dark block
2)  Sew the section from step 1 to the side of the block
Repeat until you have 36 blocks

Sew the sashing pieces in between two blocks
Then use the layout below to sew 9 blocks total
Sew the 9 blocks together in rows of 3 for the center of the quilt
Sew your first border on the sides of the quilt top
Sew your piano keys border on the sides of the quilt top

56″ X 56″ Quilt
For more quilt tutorials and easy sewing projects– come stop by:
or follow me on Facebook at Patchwork Posse. You can also find me on Pinterest.
Hope you enjoy this quilt!
Becky @

Bucket of Fish {Toss Game}

Hello everyone! Totally excited to be hanging out with you today.  I have been so lucky to work with some fantastic fabric for this project.  I don’t dip my toe into batiks often, but from now on, I would be happy to pick up a new line or two.  The colors and designs are so wonderful!  No cut square is the same, and I love that.  For some it can throw you off because you’re like what– why is this block yellow when it started off red? But for me, I love the little switches it makes and keeps you on your toes when you are designing.
For this project I used fabric from the Breezy Batiks Collection. I love this line and have a giveaway going on the blog to win 10 fat quarters from the same line!- ‘swim’ on over and sign up to win.

Printed Fish Template (see Printer Friendly Version at the end of this post)


12″ X 12″ square of fabric for each fish —you can mix and match the front and back if you’d like and use smaller pieces. If this is for a game toss, then you might want to make sure 3-4 of them are matching on one side so you can sort them out for each player easily.


1 > 7″ X 30″  Blue for the ocean waves
2 > 7″ X 30″  Green for background and lining of basket
1 > 7″ X 30″ Fusible Fleece for stiffness
2 > 8″ X 8″  Bottom lining and outside
1 > 8″ X 8″ Fusible Fleece for stiffness

1)  Print out template of fish and cut out
2)  Lay fabric right sides facing out, pin template
3)  Cut out using pinking shears
4)  Sew all the way around the fish, leaving an opening for stuffing
5)  Fill tail with poly beads, crushed walnut shells, or sand- something to give it some weight
6)  Stuff firmly the rest of the fish body- the weighted fill will shift, that’s ok, just try to keep it inside the body and not leak out when you are stuffing the rest
7)  Pin closed and sew the opening closed
Repeat with additional fish as needed
Cut: 2 > 2 1/2″ X 14″ handles
1)  Fold handles right sides together and sew
2)  Turn right sides out, iron. Set aside for later
Sewing Instructions:
1)  Place the fusible fleece on the wrong side of the outside fabric- right side facing out. Fuse it
2)  Cut the blue fabric wavy with your rotary cutter.  You can’t mess this up.  Just have fun 🙂
3)  Pin the blue fabric right sides facing out on top of the green background, lining up the bottom straight edge
4)  Zig-zag along the raw edge wave of the blue wave to secure
5)  Sew additional straight lines 1/4- 1/2″ from the last line sewn.  Repeat 3-4 times- you will be sewing through the wave, the background and the fusible fleece
6)  Fold in half and sew the ends together, making a tube
7)  Fuse the fusible fleece to the bottom outside fabric
8)  Pin right sides together the bucket tube to the bottom square. It will be tricky moving around those corners, but you can make it work
*When you get to the corner- keep the needle in the down position 1/4″ from the edge.  Lift the pressure foot and pivot the fabric to the next side.  Line up the edges and continue to sew.  Repeat at each corner
9)  Sew all the way around the square
1)  Fold in half and sew the ends together- leaving a 3″ opening for turning later
2)  Repeat steps 7-8 with the lining
3)  Pin the handles to the ouside fabric- the end of the handles should be lined up with the top edge of the bucket
4)  Stuff the bucket lining -right sides facing – to the outside bucket. Pin- making sure the bottom squares are lining up
5)  Sew along the top edge of the bucket.  Make sure the handles don’t shift
6)  Turn right sides out through the hole in the lining
7)  Stuff the lining inside the bucket and close the opening
8)  Iron the top edge of the bucket.  Sew 1/4″ from the edge along the top
9)  Fold the handles in half length wise and sew along the edge- starting and stopping 2″ from the top edge of the bucket
10)  Fill bucket with fish and have some fun!

1 Bucket + Fish for tossing

Enjoy!  Remember to stop on by the blog for the giveaway.
Becky @ Patchwork Posse

60-Minute Gift: Christmas Overnighter Cinch Sack

18” X WOF for lining (2 fat quarters in same or coordinating print)
18” X WOF for outside (2 fat quarters in same or coordinating print)
8” X WOF for strap channel  {can be a coordinating fabric}
Ribbon:  8″ X 1/2″
Rope 2– 43″ or longer {you can adjust this length to fit child}
Pre-cut scrap strips in green for tree and brown for trunk

Cut 2 – 18” X  18″  outside fabric  
Cut 2– 18”  X  18″  lining fabric
Cut 2– 4″ X 18″ strap channel
Cut 2– 4″ X width of ribbon
Cut 1/2” X various lengths– green fabric for tree

Rag Christmas Tree:
1)  Cut 3 strips 1/2” X 9” out of green scraps
2)  Fold the front outside piece in half and iron, using this creased iron line to center the tree tip,  pin the 3 strips in the shape of the tree
3)  Cut a brown 2” X 2” square for the trunk of the tree.  Pin in place.
4)  Sew down the center of these strips, and outline stitch the tree trunk
5)  Using the rest of the 1/2” green scrap strips, place on tree and sew down the center – one strip at a time
6)  Overlap additional strips, change their angle, direction to make it interesting
7)  Take a rough toothbrush and dampen the strips and scrub, this will rag the edges just a bit- or scrub with your fingernails. You can snip the edges if you’d like too

Strap Channel:

1)  Cut 2 strips 4” X 17”
2)  Hem both sides (4”) of each strip

3)  Fold in half so they will measure 2”- wrong sides together.  These will be your channels for the ties

1)  Pin right sides together both the front and back linings
2)  Sew all the way around the sides and bottom of the bag, leaving a 2 1/2” opening on one side for turning later
1)  Fold ribbon in half and stay stitch at bottom of each side of the front outside piece { 1 1/2” from bottom}

2)  Pin right sides together and stitch all the way around the sides and bottom of the bag.
3)  Turn Right sides out and iron
4)  Pin the channels to the top of the bag and stay stitch in place {sew on using 1/8th inch seam allowance so the stitching won’t show} One channel will be sewn to each side

5)  Stuff the outside into the lining, right sides together
6)  Pin along the top edge, matching the side seams
7)  Sew all the way around the top edge
8)  Turn right sides out through opening
9)  Sew opening closed and iron

Rope Strapping

8)  Tie rope to ribbon loop at the bottom of the bag.
9)  Thread through the tube directly above the ribbon loop, going around the whole bag.  The tie will be coming out the same side as it entered

10)  Repeat with rope on the other side of the bag

11)  Pull the rope to cinch the bag at the top

1 super cute cinch sack to Stuff with goodies, games and Christmas jammies!
Finished size:
17″ wide x 20″ long

Have a Merry Christmas Everyone!  Hope your overnighters are full of wonderful surprises!

Becky Jorgensen

Studio Tour: Patchwork Posse

Welcome to our final day of Studio Tours! Today we are visiting the studio of  Moda Bake Shop Chef Becky Jorgensen of the blog Patchwork Posse. If you missed the other spaces, you can see them all {here}.

{Have you visited our Show Off Your Stash Link Party yet? Tour the sewing spaces of other Moda Bake Shop readers like you!}

Here we go! Becky doesn’t just have a sewing room…she has a sewing cottage! She converted a backyard cold storage into a 15′ X 12′ work space that fits *almost* everything. (Quilters always need a little bit more room, don’t we?)

Let’s step inside a for a look around.Watch your step!

Becky has a great stash and a nice quiet spot to work on her projects. She collects buttons, dolls and other little things that catch her eye.  Not much has been done on the decorating side of the things, but it’s on her to do list!

I spy a long arm in the background! What a lucky gal.

Thanks for letting us into your space, Becky! You can see more of her studio {here}.

With Long-Arm Envy,