Christmas in July Round Up

Fabric stores are teeming with beautiful and festive Moda holiday fabric. Over the years our talented Chefs have whipped up some lovely holiday projects to help you get a jump start on Christmas sewing.

Click through to view the links to the recipes.

-Oda May

 
 

Jelly Roll Race Remix Quilt


Hello, Karin Vail from Cascade Quilts back again this month with yet another Christmas in July project!

2 Jelly Rolls (or 2 jelly roll race quilt tops – or a combo of the two!)  I used 24th and Pine by Basic Grey
2/3 yard for binding (or use leftovers for a scrappy binding)
1 yard inner border (cut into 8@ 4.5”WOF strips)
1 1/2  yards outer border (cut into 8@ 6.5”WOF strips)
5 yards backing

Probably most quilters have tried this at one point or another –  a ”Jelly Roll Race” (JRR) quilt top.  It works up fast for sure – but makes a rather ho-hum quilt.  I made one myself years ago, but it was not ever destined to be made into a quilt after I finished the top and didn’t love it.
So, WHAT do you do with a JRR quilt top that you love the fabric, but don’t love the design?  Rework it by adding yet another JRR top to the mix…..
Now, there are lots of JRR quilt tutorials out there, so I am not going to go into how to make those.  What I am going to explain is how I remade these two JRR tops into a beautiful quilt with MUCH more visual interest!  These JRR tops will each measure around 50”x64” to begin with.

Yes, I made TWO identical JRR tops, but you could certainly make two different tops and use this same technique.  It is similar to a ‘bargello’ technique.  If you did this, I would alternated between strips from the two JRR tops to get a uniform look throughout.
First, take one JRR top and fold it in half so that the top strip can be sewn to the bottom strip – so you make a JRR ‘tube’.  Think of it like a *giant* trip-around-the-world block setup.  From that tube, you will cut cross-section strips.   Here the seam has been sewn to make the tube and it’s again folded in half horizontally so I can do the subcutting.
In this quilt, I cut my strips 2.5” so that I have 2” squares in my final quilt, but you can certainly change it up and cut varying widths of strips!
For the first strip, take apart one seam between blocks.
The next strip, you will take apart the next seam up from the one you took apart on the first strip, and so on.
To make it easier to keep track and keep them in the right orientation (how they came off of the original JRR top), I cut only a few strip tubes at a time and sewed them a few at a time.
Match up your seams and sew the long verticle seams.
Where the fabrics change, you will get several almost-half square triangles.  Or, you might luck out and get a perfect HST in the mix too:
You should be able to get twenty 2.5” strips from each JRR ‘tube’, so with two ‘tubes’ you would be able to get a total width of 80” if you used it all.  But, since the length of the quilt is only 64” at this point, and I didn’t want an 80×64 quilt,  I decided to stop at 64” wide and add borders to enlarge it and have a balanced quilt.  I personally prefer a square quilt since you don’t have to worry which side is ‘up’ that way 🙂  If you are using 2 identical tops, cut 20 strips from one top, and 12 from the second.  If you are using 2 different JRR tops, then cut 16 strips from each JRR ‘tube’.
Now, take your 8@ 4.5”WOF strips and sew them into pairs to create 4 longer strips.  Measure your quilt top, cut border fabric to match, and sew the border on top and bottom.  Mine measured 64.5”.  Press, measure the length you will now need for the sides and cut your remaining border strips to length, and sew on left and right sides.  Mine measured 72.5”.
For your second border, take your 8@ 6.5” strips and sew them into pairs.  Again, measure your quilt top as per the first border.  My first measurement for the top/bottom was 72.5” and second for the sides was 84.5”.


A generous 84”x84” quilt!

Karin Vail
{Cascade Quilts}

Into the Woods Quilt

My name is Kymberly from Peas in a Pod Creations. I’m so excited to be making my debut on Moda today. I have a secret confession…I love winter. I think one of my favorite months is January when the chaos of the holidays has passed, the ground is blanketed in snow and the world is filled with a quite peace. As I was working on this quilt my husband suggested I make the inner section of the split rail block with my lights so that it looks like snowflakes. Suddenly this quilt contained everything I love about the season. I can’t wait to curl up with it and a good book on a snowy night this winter.

1 Jelly roll (For this quilt I used fabric from Kate Spain’s line In from the Cold)
1 yd green fabric (Juniper with white berries)
1 ½ yd blue fabric (Mint with snowflakes)
½ yd grey (Icicle)
4 yd backing (Mint with hot cocoa)

½ yd binding (Hearth with cookies)


Tree Blocks: 
make 32

Cut (5) 7” strips from green.  Cut strips into triangles with 9” base and point at 4.5”. (I lined my ruler up on 0 to 4.5” and then 4.5” to 9” and cut triangles as shown.)
Cut (8) 5” strips from blue. Cut each strip into 7.25” rectangles.  Keeping rectangles in pairs with wrong sides together cut rectangles in half diagonally. 

Sew blue triangle to side of green triangle. Press and repeat on other side of tree. (Your trees will look much better if you take time to press at this step.)
*Without going into complicated geometry and templates this was the best way I found to make these trees. Your edges will be a bit wonky, but this is okay. When the block is finished it gets squared up and will look great.

To create trunk cut left over blue into 2.5” x 4” strips. Cut grey into 1.5”x 2.5” pieces. Sew blue rectangles to each side of grey piece. Sew to bottom of tree and square up block to 8.5”.

Snowflake Blocks:
make 31

Divide jelly roll strips into lights and darks. (With In From the Cold I used the reds and greens as my darks and the whites, greys, and blues as my lights. I chose to remove the fabrics I used in the tree block.) Cut each jelly roll into two 18” strips.
Strip piece the lights and darks. Press towards the dark and cut into (4) 4.5” pieces. 

 Turn top piece so that the light and dark edge matches up with the light edge of bottom piece. I found it worked best to have the light edge on bottom so that the feed dogs didn’t have to worry about a seam and fed pieces through as shown. Press.
*Consistency is very important here. Make sure you lineup all of your blocks in the same way and feed them through in the same direction.

Sew with light sides facing seam and press.
Assembling the Top:
Arrange Tree and Split Rail Blocks into 9 rows of 7 blocks.
Baste, Quilt, and Bind as desired. 

One 72″x56″ quilt.

Hop over to my blog to see how I used the leftovers from the jellyroll to create a cute pieced back and a label for the quilt.

Kymberly Pease
{Peas in a Pod Creations}

A Simple Old-Fashioned Christmas Tree Skirt



Hello!  I’m liZ from over at Simple Simon and Company and I’m super excited to be here at the Moda Bake Shop today sharing a Christmas Tree Skirt pattern. 

When it comes to Christmas I’m always looking to the past…I love anything traditional, vintage, and old fashioned.  So when I saw the Historical Blenders line by Howard Marcus I knew I would have to use it for a Christmas project and a Christmas Tree Skirt seemed to fit the bill. 

Here’s what I did:

One Fat Quarter Bundle (I used Historical Blenders by Howard Marcus)

The first thing that you will need to do make this Christmas Tree Skirt is to print out the pattern pieces. You can download them here:  An Old Fashioned Christmas Tree Skirt Pattern.

Once you have them cut out and ready to go it’s time to…..

 You will need to cut out 8 of each piece. 
(I used a different, dark fabric piece for each of the large bottom triangles and then I choose 8 different light (or golden) fabric pieces to use for the long skinny triangle pieces.)

Next you will sew piece #2 to piece #3.  (Numbers are marked on each pattern piece.)
You will do this with right sides together and make sure to sew from the top down to the bottom.  (Starting at the small point of the large triangle and sewing down the entire side.)

Now…

 I do this by laying my ruler flush with the edge of my large triangle and cutting off small excess that you will have at the top.

Then…

 Now it’s time to sew piece #1 to pieces #2 and #3 that you just stitched together.
To do this again start at the top (with your light or golden pieces) and sewing with right sides together sew down the entire side of the triangle.  (Like in the photograph below.)

After they are sewn together you will have a little piece at the top that needs to be trimmed so….

Now repeat that process with the other 7 sets of pattern pieces.
Once you are done you are ready to…

Do this with rights sides together. 
When you have all 8 pieces sewn together stop!  Do not close the circle!  (Meaning do not sew piece 1 to piece 8 and you go around the Christmas Tree Skirt.)  You will need an opening to wrap your skirt around the base of your tree.

All you have let to do now is to back and bind your skirt in which ever method you prefer.
(For mine I made my own binding from 2 of the red colored fat quarters and for the backing I pieced together 6 of the remaining fat quarters.  It was easy!)

And you’re done!


One simple, old fashioned Christmas Tree Skirt.

-liZ
{Simple Simon and Company}

Apple Cinnamon Quilt


Hello this is Crystal Hendrix from Hendrixville to present you another tutorial. Here is a fun queen size quilt that would look good in any color combinations! I hope you enjoy! This version is perfectly lovely for Christmas in July.


3 Layer Cakes – Double Chocolate by 3 Sisters
1 yard Red 3840 32 (Border)
1 1/2 yards Brown 3835 41 (Border
9 3/8 yards Blue 4092 13 (Backing and Border)
  *Approximately 1 1/2 yards is used for the Border
1 1/4 yards Cream 3840 34 (Binding)


Warning: Everyone knows that when you get pregnant your brain does funny things…thus I have a pregnant brain and if something does not make sense please let me know and I will try my best to explain and help you all that I can!

This quilt is made up of a set of 56 blocks that is then surrounded by 4 different borders. At any time you can subtract a row or column of blocks or even a layer or two, but know that it will not then coordinate with the instructions below.

While sewing make sure that you use a 1/4″ seam line through out the whole quilt. 

Here is the cutting instructions for all 56 blocks:

# per block # total
Red: 4 – 2″x2″ 224
Cream: 4 – 2″x6″ 224
Brown: 1 – 4 3/8″x4 3/8″ 56
Blue: 2 – 3 7/8″x3 7/8″ 112- squares
*cut each into a diagonal 224- diagonals

Cutting Instructions for Borders: (lengths of borders will be given below)

Border #1 
With blue fabric cut 7 strips of 4.5″xWOF. 
Border #2
With your layer cake pieces you will need to cut it into 4 pieces to create a charm piece (5×5″). You will need 68 charm pieces or 17 layer cake pieces. You can choose a random pattern or you can cut according to make a color coordinated pattern. You will use two sets of 15 (top and bottom) and two sets of 19 (left and right sides).
Border #3
With the red fabric cut 9 strips of 3.25″ x WOF.

Border #4
With brown fabric cut 10 strips of 5″ x WOF.

Now lets begin assembling our blocks. You will need to make a total of 56 blocks.

I like to lay out my blocks so I know what they are going to look like, so #1 lay how your block. This will help you get the desired look of your block and will allow you to make any color patterns that you would like (I did not use any pattern but did a random pattern).

#2 Pin two of your blue triangles to each side of your block. (Tip: fold your block into 4 so you can find your center mark – this allows you to line up your points easier). #3 Sew each triangle on to the sides and then press seam.

#4 Grab your other two diagonal blue pieces and #5 pin them to your block and then #6 sew them on and then press seam.

I like at this point to trim up my newly made squares, so that the next steps go easier. #7 trim your squares to measure 6 x 6″ (Tip: when trimming make sure that you measure a 1/4″ from the point of the brown square, this will allow your points to be lined up perfecting when adding the border pieces of the block). #8 Lay your block out now and then #9 sew the top, middle and bottom pieces together and press seams. I lay them back out afterwards to make sure that I did it right (believe it or not, I do mess up in this area more often than you would think).

#10 Now pin your pieces together (I like to do it at the seam lines, this allows it so that my seams all line up and match), sew and press. #11 Now trim your blocks to a 9 x 9″ block. (Please forgive this picture, when editing I though it was a picture of the finished block I was using – so imagine that this block has the border pieces on). #12 Finish making the other 55 blocks.

Now it’s time to assemble the quilt! When assembling my quilt top I did a random order, I just grab a block and added it. If you are doing a random order, this eliminates laying it all out and then labeling rows, but do whatever you desire. #13 Sew and press your 56 blocks into a 7×8 block pattern. So this is 7 rows of 8 blocks or 8 rows of 7 blocks. I sewed all the rows together and then added all the rows together. Make sure you press all your seams as you go.

#14 Now with our first border we will now sew together our 7 strips of blue to make 2 sets of 4.5 x 60″ and 2 sets if 4.5 x 76.5″. Now the shorter sets are sewn to the top and the longer sets are sewn to the sides. Press all seams.

For the second border we are using layer cake pieces that we cut into charm pieces. I did try to do a color pattern and it does line up properly but if you are going to do a random order feel free to do so. #15 Sew two sets of 15 charm pieces. The colors shown above is the color pattern I used. Just make sure that you keep your bottom and top separate as it will make a difference.

#16 Sew together 2 sets of 19 charm pieces. Once again these are the color patterns I used and again make sure you keep your left and right sides separate and labeled if you are using a color pattern.

You don’t have to use my color pattern but can create your own.

#17 Making sure that you have your sides separated, add the top and bottom first then your sides. I like to pin my charm sets the quilt top so I can line up my seams as well and make sure that I line up the border correctly.

#18 with your third border take your strips and make 2 sets of 3.25 x 77″ and 2 sets of 3.25 x 91.5″. Sew the shorter pieces to the top and the longer pieces to the sides of your quilt top. Make sure you press your seams.

Once again you can see that my editing skills are lacking. So we will continue on with #18 – but make it part b! With your fourth and final border make 2 sets of 5 x 82.5″ and 2 sets of 5 x 100.5″. Once again sew the shorter sets to the top and bottom and the longer pieces to the sides. Press your seams.

#19 Your quilt top is now finished! Baste, quilt and bind as desired!


When you are finished you will end up with a queen size quilt approximately 91″ x 100″. I consider this to be my modern take on this type of block quilt. Some may say otherwise but to me, it is more modern.

This will look amazing on the back of your couch that you can grab when you want to snuggle while watching a good movie or read a good book. It will also look amazing on your bed!

If you have any questions please let me know! I am fully aware that I am not perfect and appreciate any pointers that I made a “goof”. Enjoy!

Crystal Hendrix
{nmommy02(at)gmail(dot)com}
{hendrixville.blogspot.com}

Charming Christmas Ornaments


Happy Christmas in July to everyone! It’s LeAnne from Everyday Celebrations with a fun and Christmassy project for you all. I have to say it was a little fun doing a Christmas project in June because I already have some of my handmade gifts crossed off my list! However, something not fun was the fact that the weekend I worked on these, it was 120 F degrees outside. (I live in Arizona.) As far from Christmassy weather as you can get. This project is simple, fun, and something you can do with your entire family. There are lots of options to make this project reflect you and your family’s Christmas decor and traditions.

{for all ornaments}
1 mini-charm pack  and/or
1 to 2 charm packs (depending on how many and whether you want identical ornaments)
1 fat quarter for initials (depending on how many you are making the solid charm squares may be sufficient)
scraps of cotton batting
baker’s twine or other desired string for hanging
1 to 2 skeins white embroidery floss
1 yard fusible webbing (I prefer Heat n’ Bond Ultrahold)
embroidery needle
doll needle or other needle with large eye for adding hanging loops

{handprint ornament supplies}
solid squares from charm pack or 1 fat quarter for initials
fabric or acrylic paint
foam brush
black embroidery floss (to embroider the year)

Note: The printable PDF includes the text for all the ornaments and hexi templates. When you print these pages, just print them flipped or mirror so the letters are backwards for fusible web.  If you don’t know how to do this, just print normally and tape the paper to a sunny window with the back facing you. Then trace onto fusible web. Or you can always print off your own letter!

Below are instructions for all the ornaments. All ornaments are finished the same way so those steps are at the very end.

{Handprint Ornament} 

I love making handprint memorabilia with my girls. These ornaments are rather large, but they still look wonderful on the tree. (They are the full 5″ with the corners trimmed.) Every year I have my girls make an ornament for their Grandmas. So this is their Grandma ornament for this year! 

1. First, select two 5″ charm squares for each ornament. Next, you will want to put a handprint on the charms you picked for the ornament backs. (I found using less busy prints helped the handprint standout more.) Tape the charms to a piece of cardboard at each corner. (After doing this I found it helpful to tape at each corner instead of just the top. The fabric can move quite a bit.) Paint your child’s hand generously with fabric or acrylic paint. Help them place their hand in the middle of the square and press their hand firmly down to get a nice print. Allow to dry.

2. I cut the corners of my squares after adding the handprint to give more of an ‘ornament’ shape. To make a template, simply take the cardboard that comes with the charm pack and cut each corner at a 45 degree angle. (I used the 45 degree mark on my cutting mat to make it consistent. Cut ornament fronts, backs, and batting using the template. Trim batting so it’s slightly smaller than the fabric.

3. If desired, embroider the year on the back with the handprint using a backstitch.

4.  To make initials trace the appropriate letter on to fusible webbing. Adhere to fabric according to directions and cut. Adhere onto ornament front. (A set of letters is included in the printable PDF.) I used my Cricut to cut my letters. If you have one, or another digital craft cutter, check out my tutorial for cutting fabric with the Cricut.

To finish the ornament, see the finishing section.

 {Hexagon Ornaments}

I love hexis! These are fun and much smaller than the handprint ornaments. (Perfect if you have kids whose hands are too big for the charms.) I made a set of mini hexi ornaments for my family with our initials. I also made a large hexi ornament that says JOY.

 1. First, select two squares for each ornament. Cut front, back, and batting using the hexagon template. (Included in the printable PDF.  I included both a large and small hexi template.) Trim batting so it’s slightly smaller than the fabric.

2. To add text or initials, trace the appropriate letter(s) on to fuisble webbing. Adhere to fabric according to directions and cut. Adhere onto ornament front. (I included a small set of letters in the printable PDF and the JOY letters.)

To finish the ornament, see the finishing section.

{Square Ornaments}

For these ornments I used the mini-charms. Select two for each ornament.

1. Select ornament front and back.  Cut a piece of batting slightly smaller than the squares.

2. Trace letters onto fusible webbing. Adhere to fabric according to directions and cut. Adhere onto ornament front. 

3. To make the JOY ornament, string together the three squares after finishing.

{Finishing}

You can either finish the ornaments by hand with a blanket stitch or by machine. 
Blanket Stitch

1.  Place the back wrong side up with the batting on top. Thread a needle with embroidery floss and knot the end. Pass needle through the batting. Place ornament top on the batting and use a blanket stitch around the ornament. (I am not an embroidery pro by any stretch so here is my favorite tutorial on the blanket stitch. So helpful!)
Machine
1. Layer the ornament back, batting, and ornament top together. Pin in the middle. Machine stitch with a generous 1/4″ seam around the ornament. Backstitch at the end. 
Hanging Loop
1. Thread a needle with baker’s twine, or other string, and thread through the top of the ornaments. Cut to desired length and tie off. (Since baker’s twine is thicker, I used a doll needle with a large eye to add the hanging loop.)


Lots of fun and festive Christmas ornaments! 

LeAnne Ballard
{everydaycelebrate.blogspot.com}

Winter Wonderland Quilt

It’s never too early to get excited for Christmas! And since this whimsical wintery quilt requires a fair amount of hand-stitching, you’ll want to give yourself plenty of time to complete it. I love the meditate quality of applique, and its handmade nature is well-suited to holiday decor. Feel free to play around with different color combinations– a black background would be very striking, or a white one would emphasize the snowy feel of this scene.


Two Bella Solids Charm Packs (SKU# 9900PP-20)
One Bella Solids Moda Candy/Mini Charm Pack (SKU# 9900MC-30A)
1 1/2 Yards Bella Solids Gray for background and binding
1/2 Yard Bella Solids Snow for tree
1 Yard Christmas Countdown for backing
Card stock or preferred template material
Fabric pen or pencil


1. First, create four circle templates: one large 4 1/2″-diameter, one medium 3 1/2″-diameter, one small 2 1/2″-diameter, and one tiny 1 1/2″-diameter.

2. From the 5″ charms, trace and cut a total of 7 large circles and 24 medium circles, cutting along the traced line.

3. Trace a small circle in the center of each large circle, then cut out inside the traced line, allowing a generous 1/4″ seam allowance. Repeat with tiny circles in the center of each medium circle. You should have donut-shaped fabric pieces.

4. Trace a tiny circle on 24 of the 2″ charms, and cut out allowing a generous 1/4″ seam around the traced line circle. Do the same with the small circles, tracing them onto the 5″ squares and cutting out with a generous 1/4″ seam around the drawn line.

5. From the Bella Solids Snow, cut one rectangle 8 1/2″ x 4″ and another 17″ x 21″. Take the larger rectangle and fold it in half along the 21″ length, then trace a diagonal as shown. Cut along the traced line through both layers so that when you unfold the fabric you have a triangle.
6. From the gray fabric, cut a rectangle 42″ x 38″. Lay the triangle and rectangle in the lower left corner of the background fabric, approximately 2″ from the side and bottom. Since you will be folding under 1/4″ around the edges of both shapes when you applique, they should be overlapping a 1/4″ so that when you sew, the folded edges will be touching. Pin in place.


7. Arrange the circles on the tree and the upper right portion of the quilt top as you like. Each two-toned circle consists of either a large circle with a small circle layered (and centered) beneath it, or a medium circle with a tiny circle layered beneath it. I placed 2 large circles and 5 medium circles in the tree itself, then arranged the rest in a billowing motion starting at the top of the tree. Pin all pieces in place (I find it easiest to use safety pins for all initial pinning, then replacing these with straight pins as I begin stitching each segment).


8. Time for some hand stitching! The outside of the tree body and the tree stump are stitched with regular applique, folding under about a 1/4″ along the edges as you sew. I folded the top tip of the tree so it was flat for about 1/2″.
The circles are stitched with a combination of regular and reverse applique. Work on one circle at a time; first, cut into the interior 1/4″ seam allowance every 1/4″ or so, then reverse applique the interior in place, stitching through the quilt back and the smaller circle that’s layered underneath while folding the seam allowance under as you go. Then, stitch the exterior of the circle using regular applique, folding under a scant 1/4″. 


9. When you’re done with the appliqué, baste and quilt as desired. I stitched curlicues in the center of each circle, then swirls in the exteriors. I chose a loose and wavy stitch for the background to accentuate the winter wonderland feel. Use the remaining gray fabric for the quilt’s binding.



One festive wall quilt (38″ x 48″) to hang up during the holidays. You could also use it as a table centerpiece for a yuletide fete.

Pippa Armbrester
{www.pippapatchwork.com}