Tumbling Around Quilt



Hi there! Konda Luckau from Moose on the Porch Quilts here. I have loved playing around with honeycombs! I have a tumbling block quilt from my grandmother that I love. I have wanted to make one for a very long time. These Honeycombs finally make this quilt easy, and fun, to make! I have a new technique for piecing these blocks by machine – including being able to chain piece the blocks. I have a new book coming out this Spring full of projects using this new technique. Give it a try. You just may like it!

1 25th & Pine Honeycomb
1 1/4 yards White Bella Solid
2/3 yard Honky Tonk Red Plaid
1 1/4 yards Backing
Plastic Hexagon Template from Honeycomb


Cutting Instructions:
1. Take the plastic hexagon template from the honeycomb. Cut it as shown below.

2. Cut the white background fabric into 4 – 2 1/2″ strips, 4 – 4 1/2″ strips, and 3 – 2 5/8″ strips.
3. Using the diamond template, cut 28 diamonds from the 2 5/8″ strips.
4. Cut the red accent and binding fabric into 4 – 1 1/2″ strips and 4 – 2 1/2″ strips.
5. Take 25th & Pine Honeycomb and cut each hexagon into three diamonds as shown below.

Sewing Instructions:
6. Reorganize the diamonds into three stacks according to color.

7. Now for the magic! This is the trick to piecing y-seams on a sewing machine. The difference between my method and traditional machine piecing techniques is that my method can be chain pieced! Chain piecing means it is a lot faster and less thread waste. Refer to the picture below.
    a. Start the seam 1/4″ down from the corner.
    b. Sew 1/4″ into the diamond parallel to the top edge of the diamond.
    c. Sew down the right edge of the diamond with a 1/4″ seam.
    d. Stop 1/4″ from bottom edge.
    e. Sew to the right edge parallel to the bottom edge.
    f. Now it is ready for the next piece!

8. Seams will be pressed clockwise.

9. The bottom diamond is sewed on one seam at a time. Using the same method as above, matching diamond points, sew the right seam.

10. This is what it looks like opened up.

11. Fold hexagon in half matching points and sew the last seam as shown below.

12. Press the seams clockwise opening up the center of the seam allowances into a bitty hexagon.

13. With those three seams, one tumbling block is created! Repeat to make 38 tumbling blocks.

 14. Lay out the center of the quilt as shown below.

15. Using the same machine piecing technique as before, sew the tumbling blocks into rows.

16. Again, using the same machine piecing technique as before, sew the rows together.

17. Trim the left and right sides even. Trim the top and bottom 1/4″ outside of the points. The quilt should now measure about 26″ x 27″. Your measurements may differ slightly because of the many bias edges. Press carefully.

18. Use the 4 – 2 1/2″ white background strips to sew on the first border. Measure carefully before cutting the length of border strips.
19. Use the 4 – 1 1/2″ red accent strips to sew on the second border. Measure carefully before cutting the length of the border strips.
20. Use the 4 – 4 1/2″ white background strips to sew on the third border. Measure carefully before cutting the length of the border strips.
21. Quilt and use the 4 – 2 1/2″ binding strips to bind the quilt.

One fabulous quilt machine pieced tumbling block quilt that measures about 39″ x 40″.

Konda Luckau
{www.moosequilts.com/blog}

Sew Busy! Organizer


Hello!  I’m Polly Monica from Aunt Polly’s Porch!  I’m so happy to be posting here today at the always awesome Moda Bake Shop!  I fell sewwww in LOVE with Moda’s Sewing Box collection and knew it would make some fun things for organizing any sewing room!  I hope you think so, too!  Let’s get busy making these eight sewing projects which include a sewing machine cover, a sewing machine mat, a versatile sewing caddy for your ironing board or armchair, a tub cover, a tie on pin cushion, a chatelaine, a square pin cushion and needle book.


1 Sewing Box charm pack

Sewing Box Charm Pack by Gina Martin for Moda
 
½ yard coordinating print # 1 (notions print white)

FABRIC SEWING BOX Sewing Notions Main Print Moda
 
½ yard coordinating print # 2 (tape measure multi)

Sewing Box - Gina Martin - Moda
 
½ yard coordinating fabric #3 (pins lime)

Sewing Box - Gina Martin - Moda
 
1 yard coordinating print #4 (buttons blue)

Sewing Box, Moda Fabric, Gina Martin, Buttons, 1/2 Yard
 
1.5 yards fusible fleece
 

3.5 yards Jumbo rick rack
Assorted colors and sizes of buttons
 

ABBREVIATIONS and NOTES-
All seam allowances are ¼” unless directed differently.
RST = right sides together
RSO = right sides out
WOF = width of fabric (selvage to selvage)
 
Sewing Machine Cover Instruction
 
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My sewing machine sits down in a Horne sewing table and it’s measurements are- 16” from right to left, 8 ½” from top of machine to tabletop, and 7 ½” deep looking at the machine from the side. (If your machine sits on top of a table, the height will be taller than mine!) You will need to measure your machine and adjust the measurements as necessary.
Take charm pack and cut all pieces in half, giving you two stacks of 42 pieces – 2 ½” by 5” rectangles.

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Set one stack aside, now cut the other stack in half, giving you two stacks of 42 pieces – 2 ½” by 2 ½” squares.

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Set one stack aside, take remaining stack of 2 ½” squares and select 16 for each side of the cover.
Lay them out in two rows of eight squares each (16 for each side).
From the leftover squares, select 4 for a four patch that will be made into a square pin cushion
And select 5 squares to be sewn into a row for a long skinny pin cushion.

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Sew the two rows of squares for one side together- press seams in one direction on the first row and in the opposite direction for the second row so that the seams will nestle together when joined. The resulting long seam can be pressed to one side or open.

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For the center panel on the cover, look at your fabric # 1. If the printed design is directional, like mine was, and you want it to be right side up on both sides of the cover, then you will cut two pieces that are 8 ¾” by 16 ½”. With RST, with the top of the design on BOTH pieces at the top, sew that 16 ½” long seam.

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Now your design should be right side up on both sides of that center seam. If your print is NOT directional then you need no center seam and can cut one piece 17” by 16 ½”.
Sew one pieced set on each 16 ½” end. Press those seams toward the center panel.
 
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Cut a piece of fusible fleece and your fabric # 2 for the batting / backing 18 ½” by 27”. Fuse the fleece onto the wrong side of either front or backing. With RSO, pin the sandwich and quilt as desired. I just did an all-over meander design.

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If you wish to add rick rack or other trim, do it now! Some folks just stitch down the center of rick rack, which is fine with the narrow ones, but for the jumbo size, I like to sew close to the edge, down each side. Then trim off excess batting/backing.

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For the ties, cut one 2 ½” by WOF strip of your fabric #3. Press it in half lengthwise.

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Then open it up and fold the two long raw edges into the center fold and press again.

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Topstitch closely down each long edge.

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Trim off selvage ends, cut it into 4 equal pieces. Lay the cover over your machine and decide where you want the ties to go

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and baste them onto the backing side with the raw end edge even with the side of the cover.

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For the binding, measure the perimeter of your cover and add 8”. Bind the edges your way! Everybody has their own way of binding . I cut my strips 2 ½” by WOF. I join the strips with a diagonal seam, press in half lengthwise, and sew onto the front of the quilt with a SCANT 3/8” seam allowance, flip binding over the seam to the back and hand sew it down. But, the binding can be done your own way!

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If you wish to add a handle at the top of the cover, cut two 2 ¾ ” by 7 ¼”pieces of your fabric #2. Cut one piece of fusible fleece 2 ¾” by 7 ¼”, and fuse onto the wrong side of one fabric piece. If you wish to add rick rack or trim on the handle, sew it onto that piece now.

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I wanted my handle to be a bit more narrow at the ends, so I folded the pieces in half and cut off the corners- see pix below.

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With RST, sew a ¼” seam all around the handle edges but leave an opening at least 2” to turn it through!
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Turn the handle RSO through that opening and hand sew the opening closed. Topstitch 3/8” inch from all edges.
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Measure the cover to find the center and mark it with a pin. Center the handle over that center, but build in a gap!

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Sew through all layers, attaching the handle to the cover at each end.

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I LOVE adding buttons to projects and especially stacking different sized buttons!!

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Add them now wherever you want!! You could even add them down the middle of the rick rack, too!!
All done! Now stand back and admire your creation!!

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Small Square and Tie-On Pin Cushions
 
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Remember that fourpatch and row of five squares you selected and set aside back when you were picking out the squares for your cover front and back?

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If you didn’t sew them together, do it now! Then lay them RST on top of a scrap of your fabric #1 which will be your backing, and cut around them.

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Sew around all sides of the fourpatch, leaving a small opening on one side to turn it through.
Clip the seam allowance diagonally across the corners, but not too close!
This will reduce the bulk there and make those corner points look perfect!

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Turn it RSO, fill it with your choice of polyfil or crushed walnut filler. I like the latter for pin cushions!!

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I get it at the local pet shop- it’s cheap and is actually made for the bottom of small pet cages.
I save my twill tape ties from all Moda jelly rolls and bundles, so I cut my ties for the Tie-On pin cushion from one of those ties. If you don’t have any, you can make ties like the ones you made for the cover from fabric scraps or use ribbon you have in your stash. To determine how long to cut your ties, measure your machine as shown below.

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Add 6” to that measurement. My machine measured 24” + 6” = 30”. So I cut a piece of the Moda twill tape 30” then cut that in half. Insert one end of each tie between the long skinny 5 patch and its backing.

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Then sew all around the edges, but remember to leave a small opening to turn it through.

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Turn it RSO through that opening, pulling out the ties, too. Fill both pin cushions al full as you like. On the skinny one, first fill it only partially up to the second seam line. Stitch through all layers at that seam between the second and third square to facilitate it fitting snugly around the corner on your machine, then fill it the rest of the way.

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Sew the openings closed with tiny stitches.

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Add stacked buttons in the center of the four patch pin cushion and at the sewn down seam on the tie-on pin cushion.

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Voila!! Done!! Yaaaay!!

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Tie the Skinny pin cushion onto your machine!! Add pins!

 
Sewing Machine Mat
 
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Cut a 16 ½” by 16 ½” piece of your fabric #4. Grab your stack of 2 ½” by 5” charm pack pieces, and select 8 pieces. Sew them together along the 5” sides. Press the seams open. Now cut this strip in half lengthwise giving you two strips that are 2 ½” by 16 ½”.

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Sew one strip on each side of the fabric square you cut above.

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Select 10 more strips, sew them together as described above, press seams open and cut in half. Sew one of the strips across the back of the piece. Set the other strip aside for now.

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Now, select 10 more strips for the tall pocket layer, sew them together as above, press seams open, then lay that piece on top of your fabric # 4, and cut a lining strip that exact same size. With RST, sew down one long side. Turn RSO, press and top stitch 3/8” from seam edge.

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Lay this pocket strip across the bottom of the mat with raw edges even all around and pin, then baste these raw edges together.

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Now, stitch through all layers wherever you want to create individual pockets. Make sure to backstitch at the top edge of each pocket seam.

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I made all my pockets the same size by stitching through all layers on every other seam line.

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Next, take the half sized strip you set aside above that has 10 squares and cut out a lining for it from your fabric #4, exactly as you did it above. With RST, sew across the top edge, turn it RSO, press and top stitch it 3/8” from edge.

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Lay it over the tall pocket strip on the lower edge of the mat, creating a second row of smaller pockets.
Baste the raw edges together on sides and bottom. Then sew through all layers again at seams to create the pockets.

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In the photo above, the orange pins show where the tall pockets were stitched and the purple pins show where I chose to sew my smaller pockets. You can sew yours wherever you want!
Use this top to cut a piece of fusible fleece the same size. Iron it onto the wrong side of the finished top. Cut the backing from your fabric #4 just a bit bigger all around than the top. Pin the sandwich and quilt as desired, but don’t quilt through the pockets!!

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If you want to add rickrack or trim, sew it on now!!
Trim the edges even and bind as desired using your fabric #3!

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Hand sew the binding to the back of the mat! Taadaa!!
Done!! YAY!! Now set your machine on it and fill up those awesome pockets!!

 
Versatile Caddy
 
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Believe it or not, you still have some leftover 2 ½ strips from your charm pack, and you have scraps from your yardage we’ve been using, which you can cut into a few more 2 ½” by 5” strips if you want more variety!
Select 3 strips for pockets on one end of the caddy and 4 strips for the thread catcher on the other end of the caddy. Sew them together, cut a piece of fusible fleece for the four strip set, and fuse it on the back. Lay them both on your fabric #4, and cut a matching lining piece for each.

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With RST, sew one long side together on both, turn both RSO, press seams and topstitch 3/8” from seam edge. On the four strip piece with the fleece inside, quilt it as desired.

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Set both aside for the moment!
Cut 2 pieces 6 ½” by 18” from fabric # 4, and one piece the same size from fusible fleece.

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Fuse the fleece on the wrong side of one piece. Layer RSO, then quilt as desired, creating the caddy base.

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Align the three strip piece at one end and baste the raw edges on all three sides.

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Then stitch through all layers on the 2 seam lines to create 3 pockets. Backstitch at the top of each pocket seam.

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Align then baste the SIDES of the four strip set at the other end of the caddy base. Then pin the center bottom of the four strip piece to the center of the bottom of the caddy base and then make two small pleats as you pin the rest of the bottom edge of the four strip piece to fit the base.

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Then baste across the bottom edge.

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If you wish to add rickrack or trim, add it now!

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Trim edges even and bind with fabric #3. Set aside.
Select 6 leftover 2 ½” by 5” strips for the caddy pin cushion.
Cut them in half creating 12 squares 2 ½” by 2 ½”.

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Arrange them in two groups of 6 and sew each group together, leaving a small opening in the center seam of one group to use to turn it through later.

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Place the two pieces RST, and using a ruler and pen, draw a line 1” in from each corner point and trim those corners off.

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Now, sew all around the edges. Turn it RSO through the opening in the bottom seam.

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Fill the pin cushion with polyfil or crushed walnuts and handstitch the opening closed.

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I cut an 8” piece of rickrack and hand stitched/gathered one long edge and drew the thread up to create a ruffled flower.

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I hand stitched it to the center of the pin cushion and added some stacked buttons, as well.

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You can embellish your pin cushion as desired! Center the pin cushion in the middle of the caddy and hand stitch it through the back side to the caddy. YESSSSSSSS! All done!!

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Now you can use it on the end of your ironing board and on an armchair in front of the TV!!

 
Tub Cover
 
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I wanted a tub to sit on my sewing table for sewing tools and materials. I had a large plastic 16 ounce Cool Whip tub container that was the right size! The circumference was 18” and the height was 5”.

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Using the stack of leftover 2 ½” by 2 ½” square charm pack pieces, select 20 pieces and arrange and sew them together in two rows of ten squares.

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If you want to add rickrack or trim, do it now!! I added rickrack down the center seam line.
Cut and fuse a matching piece of fleece to the back of it, then quilt it as desired. I grid-quilted it.

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Cut a matching piece of fabric #4 for the lining, but make one end about an inch longer. Also, just a note here that for backings and lining and even batting/fleece, you can piece smaller scraps together when needed. I save small pieces of batting and connect them with fusible batting tape.

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You will see this tape on the back of this tub cover!

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Another tip is to trim off corners of seam allowance at points, as shown in photo below, to make them turn RSO better.

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Sew two long sides and one short end seams- leaving open the short end with the longer lining piece.
Turn the cover RSO, topstitch 3/8” from the edges and fold up the longer lining end to enclose the raw edges and stitch it closed.

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Pin the cover TIGHTLY around the tub, then slide it off. Sew it closed on the topstitch line of the finished end. I added a stack of buttons for embellishment, then slid it back onto the tub.

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Another little project complete!! Yahoo!!

 
Sewing Chatelaine
 
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Line up 18 to 22 of your leftover 2 ½” squares in a long row. (Don’t forget you have some yardage scraps you can cut into 2 ½” squares to supplement your leftovers and provide a bit more variety.)

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Sew them together, press the seams open then press it in half lengthwise

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and use the same technique you used above to create the sewing machine cover ties to make a long topstitched piece.

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Fold in one short raw edged end as you topstitch it, and slip in a 2” loop created from a bit of stash ribbon or thinner rick rack as I did.

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Knot the other raw edged end.

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Set aside for now. Select a green 2 ½” square, fold it in half then in half again and cut into a petal shape using pinking shears if you have them,

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if not, just use regular scissors. Cut carefully from between two petals just to the center of the piece. Set aside for the moment.

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Select 8 more 2 ½” squares and sew them into four patches. Lay them RST, and trim off the bottom corners creating a triangular shape with the narrow end at the bottom. This will become your strawberry shaped pin cushion. Sew all around leaving the top open. Using needle and doubled thread, sew a gathering stitch around the open top edge.

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Turn RSO, and stuff with polyfil. Push the knotted end of the finished strip down into the polyfil and draw up the thread- gathering the raw edge tightly inside around the strip. Secure it with stitches and a secure hidden knot.

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Wrap the leaf piece around the top of the strawberry and hand stitch it there.

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Add some pins and needles, if desired!!

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Sew on a small button a few inches in from the loop at the other end, so you can secure your small scissors there!! Well done! Another part of the set is complete!! You can wear your chatelaine around your neck while doing hand sewing in your favorite chair in front of the TV and never lose your scissors between the cushions again!!
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Needlebook
 
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After all this, I still had a few leftover 2 ½” by 5” strips, and I cut two more from yardage scraps.
Sew the four strips together. Cut and fuse a matching piece of fleece to the wrong side. Quilt as desired. Add trim or rickrack if you desire. Cut a 4” piece of stash ribbon or thin rickrack, fold into a loop and baste on the center of the back.

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Cut a matching piece of fabric #4, or other yardage scrap, for the lining. With RST, sew around the edges leaving a small opening for turning.

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Turn it RSO, hand sew the opening closed then topstitch around all edges.

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Cut three 4” by 6 ¾” pieces of scrap batting .
Draw a line down the center with a heat erasable pen.

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Line up this drawn line with the center seam of the cover.

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Carefully flip it over and sew down the center seam from the cover side and through all thicknesses.

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Erase the drawn line on the batting with a hot iron. Fold the book on that center seam line.
Add a button or two on the front allowing it to be secured with the loop from the back!

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Add some needles inside and that’s it! You have completed the set of eight projects in this pattern collection!!

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Pat yourself on the back and enjoy using your new sewing room creations!!

 

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Eight sewing room essentials including a Sewing machine cover, a square pin cushion, a tie on pin cushion, a versatile caddy, a sewing machine mat, a tub cover, a chatelaine, and a needle book!
 
Thanks ever so much for trying out these projects! You may have spotted my sweet Westie – Yogi, in some of the photos!

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Come visit us soon at my blog- www.auntpollysporch.blogspot.com!!

We’d love to have you come and visit!!
Polly Monica
{www.auntpollysporch.blogspot.com}

Candy Flowers Pillow




1 Mini Charm Pack – Print / Chance of Flowers
2 Mini Charm Packs – Solid / Bella Solid in Snow
3 Coordinating Fat Quarters
21″ Pillow Form


22″ Square of batting for quilting the pillow top
22″ Square of scrap fabric or muslin

Pull 40 printed charms and 64 solid charms.

Pair up 40 prints with 40 solids, right sides facing.  Finger press a a diagonal crease on one side.

Chain stitch the 40 pairs of prints and solids on the diagonal crease.

Optional: 
Without breaking the chain, run the the charms back through and stitch a 1/2″ over.  Rather than throwing the trimmed fabric away, this quick step will create 40 little HST’s for future projects.

Cut. The pictures below show both options.

Open and press.

You should have a stack of 40 Half Square Triangles (HST) and 24 Solids.

Layout:
Using 12 HST’s and 4 solids, create a star.

Add the next row around – double check to make sure your HST’s are going in the right direction.

Add the points on the top and bottom.

Fill in with the remaining solid charms.

Piece:
Feel free to use your preferred method, I’ll show mine.

Some people like to stitch from the inside out, others in rows or even quadrants. This is how I piece several small squares that I want to keep in a certain layout and direction.

Going in vertical rows:  Fold the squares on the right column onto the squares on the left.

Chain stitch – do not cut the thread between squares.

Feel free to press the seams, I don’t find it necessary and I will press later on.

Using the set of chained pairs, fold the first two pairs right sides together and stitch.  Open. Fold the next pair up onto the previous pair and stitch. Repeat until all 8 pairs are pieced together.

Leaving them chained is nice because they stay in the right order and direction.

Open and press the seams all in one direction.  When you complete the next row, press those seams in the opposite direction. This will make it easier to piece the rows together.

Stitch the two completed rows together.

Stitch the other two rows using the same method, and sew the halves together.

If your edges are raggedy, feel free to trim a little and straighten them out. Just be careful not to cut off the HST points along the edge and leave a seam allowance.

Take a Fat Quarter and cut four 2.5″ strips down the length of the fabric.  You will have four strips approximately 21″ wide.

Attach one strip to the top and one to the bottom of your block.

Press open and trim.

Attach the other two strips to the sides.

Press open and trim.

Optional:  Using the batting and scrap fabric, quilt as desired. Trim.


Double fold:

Take your remaining 2 Fat Quarters and along the 21″ side,  fold over 1″ and press.  Fold over another 1″ and press.

Top stitch along the top and bottom of the fold.   Repeat with the other Fat Quarter.

The Math:

The two back pieces will create an envelope style enclosure and they need to overlap about 4″.  Since everyone sews 1/4″ seams a bit different, we may have slightly different sized pillow tops.

Take the width of your pillow top and divide by 2.  
Add 2″. 
You should be somewhere near 12″. 

Trim both Fat Quarters to that measurement. Trim the raw edge opposite your double edge fold, leaving the 21″ width intact.

Example:  My pillow top is 20″.  20 divided by 2 = 10. Add 2 = 12″.  I now have two fat quarters that measure 21″ x 12″ each. (21″ side has the double fold)

Part 2:

Trim both Fat Quarters so they don’t hang off pillow top. Instead of being 21″ they will probably around 20″.

Layer:  
Pillow Top right side up
Fat Quarter #1 right side down – lining up raw edges along the side
Fat Quarter #2 right side down – lining up raw edges along the opposite side

Pin or clip edges in place. Stitch along the edge all the way around.

Zip Zag or Serge the seam you created. This will help prevent fraying in the future.

Turn right side out and you are done!

I’m using a 21″ pillow form.


One pillow cover.  If you make a Candy Flowers pillow cover, I would love to see it.

Julie Hirt
{627handworks.com}

Quilt As You Go Improv Pillows



Hi All! This is Jera from www.QuiltingintheRain.com bringing you a creative weekend project. This pillow uses a modern Quilt as you Go technique which will be featured in my upcoming book, Quilt-As-You-Go Made Modern, to be released this Fall. I’m so excited to share this technique with you all!
 
The Quilt as you Go technique is very creative as it doesn’t follow a precise pattern. Rather, it takes on more of a improvisational style of piecing and quilting. For updates on my latest quilting endeavors, check out my Quilting in the Rain Facebook page and blog. You can also find me on Instagram. Thanks so much for stopping by and enjoy the tutorial!


Please Note – For this pillow I used leftover Layer Cake squares from the April Showers Collection by Bonnie and Camille. Leftover fat quarter scraps will work too. For the solid borders, I used Moda Solids Prairie Cloth in Buff (this material is home decor weight but has a linen/canvas feel to it). For the back of the pillow, I used Moda’s Twill (home decor weight), Nautical Ticking Stripes in Red.

For Pillow No.1 (14″ x 14″ pillow cover):

  • 1 layer cake square (or a 10″ square cut from a fat quarter) 
  • 1/4 yard border fabric
  • 3/8 yard Backing
  • 15.5″ x 15.5″ batting square (needle-punched batting)
  • pillow insert

 For Pillow No.2 (16″ x 12″ pillow cover):

  • 6 layer cake squares for variety (or six different fat quarter prints)
  • 1/4 yard border fabric
  • 3/8 yard backing  
  • 17.5″ x 13.5″ batting square (needle-punched batting)
  • pillow insert 


    For Pillow No. 1 (14″ x 14″ pillow cover):

    1.  Take a 10″ square and place it in the center of the batting. Place a few pins to help keep it down. Then, quilt it directly to the batting. As shown below, make sure your stitch starts and ends on the batting.

    I did free-motion quilting with some simple loopy-loops. If you’ve never free-motion quilted before, now is a good time to try it out as it’s easier to do it on a smaller, more manageable block.

     2. From your border fabric, cut two 3.5″ strips along the length. Take a strip and trim it with fabric scissors so it’s the same length as the side of the square. With right sides facing together, sew a 1/4″ seam allowance.

    3. Press open, and then quilt lines that run parallel to the seam. There will be some extra fabric hanging over the batting. As shown below, make sure your stitch starts and ends on the batting.

    4. Take the strip and trim it with fabric scissors so that it measures the length of the square and strip that you just pieced together, as shown below. With right sides facing together, sew a 1/4″ seam allowance.

    5. Press open, and then quilt lines that run parallel to the seam. There will be some extra fabric hanging over the batting. 

    6. Repeat the previous steps until there is border fabric surrounding all four sides of the square. You are essentially piecing fabric in a log-cabin style method, but quilting it directly onto the batting as you go.
    When you are finished, the entire batting will be covered and will look similar to this.
    The back will look similar to this:
    Flip the block over so the batting side is facing you. Trim the excess fabric sticking out side of the batting. Then, flip it over so the patchwork is facing you and trim approximately 1/4″- 1/2″ from all four sides so that your block measures 14.5″x14.5″.
    7. Next, create an envelope closure for the backing. From your backing fabric, cut two 11″x14.5″ rectangles. Along the length,  turn the edge 1/4″ under, press, then turn under 1″, then press again. Stitch along the fold to keep in place to create a pretty seam. Repeat on the other rectangle as well. 
    With right sides facing together, take one rectangle and align it along the left side of the pillow cover. The finished seam you created from the previous step should be facing toward the right. Pin to keep in place, then sew a 1/4″ seam allowance along the perimeter as illustrated by the dashed line below. Start and end your stitch with a back-stitch.
    Repeat with the other rectangle, but align it on the right side of the pillow. Lastly, trim the corners to get rid of bulk fabric, and then turn right side out.
    Insert the pillow and there you have it! 🙂

     
    For Pillow No.2 (16″ x 12″ pillow cover):
    Please note: For this pillow, the same exact technique that was described above (for pillow No.1) was used, except with smaller pieces of fabric. The technique I explained from the first pillow will give you the basic understanding you need to complete this next pillow. That being said, I will not list step-by-step instructions.  Rather, I have listed the order in which the strips should be pieced. Enjoy!
    1. From your fabric, cut one 3″ square and a couple 2″ strips from each print (you will trim these strips as needed).
    2. Start by placing the 3″ square in the center of the batting, and then quilt it. Next, add strips making sure to trim them with fabric scissors to the correct size. Add the strips in the following order, using the quilt as you go method previously described. For this pillow, I quilted straight lines that ran parallel to all of the seams. 
    Tip! Fabric can shift while stitching on the batting. Correct for this by keeping the strips aligned and ‘square’ them as necessary. The seams of each successive piece should be at a 90° angle to the previous quilted piece. 
    Also, please note that your pieces will shift around slightly and the batting will stretch a little – this is completely normal. So don’t expect yours to look as straight as the illustration above. =)
    3. From your border fabric, cut one 5-6″ wide strip along the length. With right sides facing together, place the strip along the length of the patchwork as shown below. Overlap the strip with the patchwork as needed to straighten it out, and as mentioned in the “Tip!” above. Sew.
    4. Press the strip down, and then quilt lines that run parallel to the seam. Repeat for the top so that the entire batting is covered.
    5. Flip the block over so the batting side is facing you. Trim the excess fabric sticking out side of the batting. Then, flip it over so the patchwork is facing you and trim approximately 1/4″- 1/2″ from all four sides so that your block measures 16.5″x12.5″.
    6. Next, create an envelope closure for the backing. From your backing fabric, cut two 11″x12.5″ rectangles. Repeat step 7 from Pillow No.1 to create the envelope closure and to finish your pillow. 
    And that’s it! Quilt as you Go is a fun and different way to quilt. I hope you enjoyed learning this new improvisational technique! Now that you know the concept, you can get really creative with all the other fun Quilt as you Go pillow designs you can think up! 
    (Above: Paige modeling a Quilt as you Go strip quilt using the Scrumptious collection by Bonnie and Camille).
    Come visit me at www.QuiltingintheRain.com for more Quilt as you Go projects. You can also find me on Facebook and Instagram.
    Let your creativity rain!
    xoxo
    -jera brandvig

    Tidy Linens Bag



    Hi! Lisa Calle of Vintage Modern Quilts here today with a very easy project that will help you get a jump in your spring cleaning. A couple of years ago I bought a set of sheets that came with a handy little storage bag and I thought it was a great idea. The only problem? There was no way I’d ever be able to fold those sheets up as small and tidy as they were straight out of the package and they never fit into the bag again. So what’s a girl with a sewing machine and tons of fabric to do? Make my own cuter linens storage bag!

    The hardest part of this project is folding that fitted sheet. I made mine for queen size sheets but it will fit king or full, as well. You may want to decrease measurements all over by 1″ to 2″ for twin sheets.

     
    2 fat quarters (I used a pair of gray prints from V and Co.’s Color Me Happy line)
    8″- 11″ of Velcro
    Marking pen


    Hand sewing needle and embroidery thread


    Cut each of your fat quarters into a 14″ x 15″ rectangle. If you are using a directional print, the 15″ measurement is your length. From the remaining pieces of each fat quarter, cut a 6″ x 8″ rectangle. Set these smaller rectangles aside.

    Sew a 1/4″ hem along the top of each large rectangle (or use a serger, if you have one).  Trim a 2½” square from the bottom left and right corners of each rectangle.

    Place rectangles right sides together and sew a  ¼” seam along the sides and the bottom, leaving the top and the corners open. Be sure to back stitch at each edge. Press seams.


    Box the corners of your bag to create depth. To do this, pinch the fabric together so that the seams line up as pictured.

    Sew ¼” seam along each boxed corner, back stitching at the beginning and end of your seam.

    To create the fold-over flap of your bag, join the small (6″ x 8″) rectangles together along the long side. Press the seam to one side. Hem all sides of the resulting rectangle.

    Determine which side of the bag will be the front. Find the center of the back of the bag and match up with the center of the flap, right sides together. Sew a ¼” seam to join these sections.

    Pin one strip of the Velcro along the inside of the bag flap, close to the edge. Sew ⅛” around the Velcro to attach it to the bag. Put your folded sheets in the bag and close the flap firmly, marking where the edge meets (use a removable marking pen). Remove the sheets from the bag and pin the other piece of Velcro just a hair above your mark, again sewing a ⅛” around the Velcro to attach it to the bag.

    That’s it! You are done. But if you want to take this project up another notch, use embroidery floss to add some important info to the bag. Are these sheets for the guest room? Your child’s room? Or maybe just add the size.


    1 tidy linens bag

    Lisa Calle
    {vintagemodernquilts.com}

    Applique Hearts Pillow

     

    Hi All! This is Jera from www.QuiltingintheRain.com bringing you this simple Applique Hearts Pillow tutorial just in time for Valentine’s day. Depending on what fabrics you use, the pillow can be used year round. This pillow has an easy envelope enclosure, making this a quick and fun weekend project that you can complete in a few hours.

    Also, I wanted to share that I have a quilting book coming out this year, so come check out my blog for details (or for some great tutorials!), or follow me (and my corgi, Paige) at Quilting in the Rain’s Facebook to see my latest quilts and projects. Thank you so much for stopping by! Let your creativity rain!

    • 1 yard Moda Solids Prairie Cloth in Buff (this material is home decor weight but has a linen/canvas feel to it) 
    • 1 Bella Solids charm pack in Porcela, plus one scrap for the colored heart
    • Clear glue that works on fabric
    • Coordinating thread
    • 20″ square pillow insert


    1. From the prairie cloth, cut one 21″ square. For the back of the pillow, cut two 15″ x 21″ rectangles (these will be made into the envelope closure).

    From the charm squares, cut hearts of varying shapes and sizes. I think the variety and imperfection of the heart shapes adds character to the pillow. To cut a big heart, simply fold a charm square in half and crease it with your finger so it stays folded. Then, use fabric scissors to cut the arch of ‘half of a heart’ along the folded edge. When you unfold it, you will have a heart shape.

    To make smaller hearts,  repeat but cut two hearts from one charm square. 

    I started by cutting approximately 8 big hearts, and then filled up the pillow with smaller and medium sized hearts. Also, from your scrap fabric cut one medium-size colored heart.
    2. Next, arrange the hearts on the 21″ square.
    3.Use clear glue that works on fabric to temporarily hold the hearts in place. Use very little glue as this is just an alternative to using pins and is meant to be temporary. For each heart I put the tiniest drop of glue and then spread it with my finger to make a very thin layer.
    This is the glue I ended up using but i’m sure Elmers would work just as well. I just recommend getting a clear adhesive.
    4. Sew the hearts in place using a regular presser foot. I simply guided the edge of my presser foot along the heart to sew a 1/4″ seam allowance, using a straight stitch setting.
    If you’ve never done this before, to get around the curves of the heart you will need to stop and pivot the fabric quite often. To do this, simply stop sewing with the needle in down position, lift the presser foot and pivot the fabric underneath to follow the curve. You’ll get the hang of it. 🙂 
    5. Along the length of a 15″ x 21″ rectangles,  turn the edge 1/4″ under, press, then turn under 1″, then press again. Stitch along the fold to keep in place as shown below. Repeat on the other rectangle as well.

    6. With right sides facing together, take one rectangle and align it along the left side of the pillow cover. The finished seam you created from the previous step should be facing toward the right. Pin to keep in place, then sew a 1/2″ seam allowance along the perimeter as illustrated by the dashed line below. Start and end your stitch with a back-stitch.

    Repeat with the other rectangle, but align it on the right side of the pillow.

    Clip the corners to rid of bulk and then turn right side out through the envelope opening.

    7. Lastly, rub your hands up and down the pillow to help ruffle-up the edges of the hearts. The semi-freyed and ruffled hearts adds texture to the pillow. The freying will not go beyond the stitch. 

    And there you have it! A beautiful, applique heart pillow!


    One fabulous 20″ x 20″ pillow

    Thanks again for checking out my tutorial! Come visit me at www.QuiltingintheRain.com or follow me on Facebook at QuiltingintheRain. You can also find me on Instagram.

    Let your creativity rain! 🙂

    Jera Brandvig
    {www.QuiltingintheRain.com}

    Patchwork Pot Holder



    Hi everyone! My name is Hilary and I blog over at Young Texan Mama. I am really excited about sharing my first project with you over here at the Moda Bake Shop. I love working with pre-cuts and this is a simple and quick project that uses the adorable Moda Mini Charm Packs.

    1 – Moda Candy Mini Charm Pack
    2 – Fat Quarters
    1 – 6.5″ x 6.5″ piece of cotton batting
    2 – 6.5″ x 8″ piece of cotton batting
             or
    1 – 6.5″ x 8.5″ piece of batting & 1 – 6.5″ x 8.5″ piece of Insul-Bright batting

    Cutting:
    Out of one Fat Quarter cut the following:
    2 – 6.5″ sqaures
    1 – 6.5″ x 8.5″ rectangle

    Out of your 2nd fat quarter:
    3 – 2.25″ x 22″ strips (they don’t have to be exactly 22″ just cut them from the long side of your fat quarter).

    Step 1: Select 9 mini charms to be the main panel of your pot holder, and 3 mini charms to be the accent of the larger piece.

    Stitch the 9 minis into 3 rows of 3. I like to chain piece my squares over sewing one at at time.

    Press your seams in alternating directions, then sew the 3 rows into a 9 patch block. I like to press the seams between the rows open to reduce the bulk. You’ll be left with a 6.5″ square.

    Step 2: Take your 3 remaining minis and sew into a row of 3. Press your seams in one direction, you’ll be left with a 2.5″ x 6.5″ strip. Sew this strip to one of your 6.5″ squares of fabric from your FQ.

    Step 3: Using your 9 patch block, a piece of 6.5″ batting, and the remaining 6.5″ fabric square, make a quilt sandwich & quilt as desired.

     I like to baste the layers together with a couple of safety pins to keep the layers from shifting while quilting.

    I quilted my piece with diagonal lines through the points of the squares, but you can quilt it however you want. I think it would look cute with loops or an all over meander. 

    Step 4: Take your pieced 6.5″ x 8.5″ rectangle, your 2 – 6.5″ x 8.5″ pieces of batting (or Insul-Bright), and your 6.5″ x 8.5″ rectangle. Sandwich the 4 layers together, baste  with safety pins, and quilt. I used 2 pieces of cotton batting for the interior of my pot holder.

    I’ve never had problems with 2 layers of cotton batting not being enough insulation, but if your worried, then a layer of Insul-bright would definitely protect your hand from heat. 

    Step 5: Sew your 3 binding strips together, end to end, so you end up with on long strip. Press the seams open to reduce the bulk. Fold binding in half, wrong sides together, and press. Cut a 4 inch piece of binding for your loop, and cut a 6.5 inch piece of binding for the top of your square panel.

    Take the 6.5 inch strip and sew it to the top edge of the main panel with a 1/4″ seam allowance. Once sewn, fold it around to the back and stitch in place. I like to machine bind mine, but if you prefer you can hand stitch it down.

    This is what your main piece will look like when you’re finished. Set it aside. 

    Step 6: With your mini charms facing up, baste your 2 panels together with a 1/8″ seam allowance. That will prevent shifting when you sew your binding on. Sew slowly because you’ll be sewing through several layers of fabric.

    Take the 4.5″ piece and fold the ends to the center and press, creating a double fold binding. Sew along the open long edge to close it together. 

    Pin and baste the loop you just created to the back of the 6.5″ x 8.5″ quilted panel. 

    Step 7: Take the remainder of your binding and stitch it to your potholder with 1/4″ seam allowance. Again, sew slowly because you will be sewing through several layers of fabric. A walking foot might be beneficial for this step. 

    When you get to the loop, make sure it is laying flat on the back of the pot holder. 

    Step 8:  When you get back around to your starting point, make sure you have enough binding so that the 2 edges overlap about 3/4″. (I had already trimmed out the remainder of my binding at this point.)

    Fold over the raw edge of one strip, and then tuck the other one inside. That way when you sew it together there are no raw edges showing. Fold the edges flat and continue sewing your seam, making sure to back-stitch where you started.

    Step 9:  Once it is stitched down, fold binding to the back and pin or clip in place. If you pin, try not to sew over your pins because it could break your needle and mess up your machine. I learned that the hard way when I first learned how to sew.

    Again when you get to the loop, make sure it is laying flat.When you get back around to your starting point back-stitch to secure the stitches, and you’re done!

    When you’re finished you are left with 1 super adorable pot holder to spice up your kitchen!   
    There are enough mini charms in a pack to make 3 pot holders, but you’ll need more of your other materials. 
    I hope you enjoy making this pot holder as much as I did, and if you make it I’d love for you to share it to the Moda Bake Shop Flickr group. Thanks so much for stopping by!

    Hilary Smith
    {www.youngtexanmama.com}