Honey Hive Picnic Quilt

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Hey there everyone! It’s Allegory again from {sew} allegorical.

I don’t know about you but I’m still waiting on spring to show up at my house. I figured while I was hiding inside from the cold I could put together a spring picnic quilt. This way I’ll be ready as soon as a sunny day hits.

This jellyroll friendly quilt finishes at 48″ x 60″ using a repeat of a 12″ finished block. The repeating design means you can adjust this pattern to be larger if you’d like.

Let’s break it down.

1 Jelly Roll of Honey Honey by Kate Spain
1 Jelly Roll of Bella Natural (9900JR-12)
1 Charm Back of Bella Black (9900PP-99)

Batting: 56″ x 68″
3 yards of backing fabric of your choice. (I used Honey Honey Tide Apiary)
240 inches of binding in your preferred technique

This quilt is constructed off of one basic block. For mine I chose to mix different prints from the line together for a scrappy look. You can also use a single print for each block (which I think would be a great variation!).

I’ve made a handy block diagram to help keep track of the cutting and piecing for each block.

HH diagram
Cutting:
For one block you need to cut the following:
*The Natural and Honey Honey cuts use the 2.5″ width of the Jelly Roll. Just cut the length straight from the Jelly Roll strip*
From Natural strips:
Two 12.5″ 
Two 5.5″
Two 4.5″
Two 3.5″
Two 2.5″
From Honey Honey:
One 2.5″
One 4.5″
One 6.5″
Two 3.5″
From Black Charm square:
One 2.5″ square
Here’s all my cuts for one block: 
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Block Assembly: 
This block is super simple to construct. All piecing is done with 1/4″ seam.

Following the diagram above to match your cuts, piece together each of the rows. All of your rows will end up 12.5″ long.

Press seams however you choose. I like to press mine open.

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Now that you’ve turned pieces into rows, sew the rows together into your block.
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You’ve completed one Honey Hive block!
Repeat these steps to make enough blocks to complete your quilt. My layout was four blocks wide and five blocks long, so you’ll need twenty blocks total. 
Lay your blocks out into rows and play with the arrangement until you find one you like.
You’ll have five rows of four blocks.
HH quilt
Still using a 1/4″ seam, sew your blocks together into rows. Join your rows to complete your quilt top!
Baste, bind and quilt as desired.
For my quilt, I knew it would become my new picnic blanket so I chose a no-binding option and quilted it with wavy lines throwing in a few loops. It reminded me of a bee’s path.
HH quilting close up


One spring inspired 48″ x 60″ quilt!

HH full shot

Happy Sewing!

Allegory Lanham
{sew}allegorical

Type Geek Pillows



Hi there! It’s Casey from Casey York Design and Studioloblog.wordpress.com, and I’m back to share the pattern for my Type Geek pillows. I am a self-professed type geek, myself, so I couldn’t resist coming up with a project for Typography month on the Moda Bake Shop. These pillows are a perfect way to showcase your favorite fabric collections and fonts. I had so much fun matching typefaces to fabric lines that I couldn’t stop with just one pillow and ended up making three. You can find the templates for these three appliqued words in the Printer Friendly version of this tutorial at the bottom of this page. However, it’s easy to create your own templates, and this project is even more fun if you make up your own fabric-font pairings. I hope you have as much fun with this project as I did, and that you’ll share your finished pillows with me through the Casey York Quilts flickr group!

Front patchwork and back appliqué: one jelly roll (samples show PB&J, Comma, and 2wenty Thr3e)
Pillow back: (1) fat quarter or ¼ yd. solid white fabric (samples show Bella Solids in Porcelain)
Front Appliqué: (1) piece solid white fabric, 12” long X 3” wide
Lightweight, double-sided, paper backed fusible web: (1) 9” X 12” sheet
(1) 18” zipper 

Please note: this pattern uses only (9) jelly roll strips, resulting in a lot of leftover fabric. You may want to plan another project to use the excess—I recommend one of the other wonderful tutorials here on the Moda Bake Shop!


Step 1: Make the pillow front:

Select nine strips from the jelly roll, trim to measure 18” long. Stitch along long sides to form a striped patchwork panel. Trim to measure 17 ½” X 17 ½.”

Tip: For maximum contrast, try to position a darker print or near solid as the second stripe from the bottom. This will ensure that your white appliqués show up well. Reserve the rest of this strip for the appliqués on the back of the pillow, which you will make in Step 2.

Step 2: Make the Appliqués

Print the template for the typeface of your choice—this tutorial features Helvetica, Rockwell, and Playbill. You will only need one template page per pillow. Templates can be found in the printer friendly version of this tutorial linked at the bottom of this page.


Tip: Make your own templates: Select a favorite font from your computer’s word processing program (bold san serif or slab serif fonts work best for this project). Type out the name of the typeface, then enlarge the character size until the letters are approximately 2” tall. This generally works out to be a type size of 180 to 210 pt., although this will differ from typeface to typeface. Print your template; for the pillow front appliqués, reverse the letters by turning the page over and tracing the outlines of the printed characters on the back. Use your templates to make fusible appliqués as follows.

Following the manufacturer’s instructions, trace the templates onto the double-sided light fusible web. Cut out roughly, leaving a ¼” margin around your traced lines; you may want to cut out the entire word rather than cutting out each letter individually. Fuse the letters that appear reversed onto your white appliqué fabric. Fuse the letters that appear correctly oriented onto the wrong side of the jelly roll strip you reserved from Step 1, or a different strip that matches the second stripe from the bottom of your patchwork panel. Make sure to use a pressing cloth between your iron and fabric in order to avoid getting sticky residue on your sole plate.

Step 3: Place the Front Appliques:

Position your white fabric appliqués on the patchwork panel, aligning them with the bottom edge of the second stripe from the bottom. You will want to make sure that the last letter is at least 1 ½” from the right hand edge of the panel to leave room for the seam allowance.

Tip: Begin laying out your letters from the right-most letter and move left (i.e. backwards) towards the left side of the panel. 

When you are satisfied with your layout, fuse the appliqués in place, again using a pressing cloth between fabric and iron. Stitch around the appliqués using your machine or by hand; the samples were stitched by hand using a blanket stitch and a single strand of six-stranded cotton embroidery floss.


Step 4: Make the Pillow back:

From the solid white fabric, cut two rectangles measuring 17 ½” wide X 8 ½” long and 17 ½” wide X 11 ½” long. Fold one long edge of the 17 ½” X 8 ½” rectangle back 1 inch and press well, creating a crease.

Install the zipper: 

Make sure the zipper is zipped. Unfold the crease in the 17 ½” X 8 ½” rectangle and place with the crease facing up; this is the right side of your pillow back. Place zipper face-down along the 17 ½” edge closest to the crease and align long edge of zipper tape with edge of fabric; pin well. Your zipper will be slightly longer than your pillow back is wide; to create a new “stop”, simply stitch back and forth several times across the zipper teeth at the point where the zipper reaches the 8 ½” edge of the fabric. Use your machine’s zipper foot to stitch as close to the zipper teeth as possible. When you approach the zipper pull, lower the needle, raise your presser foot, and carefully unzip the zipper until the pull is behind your needle. Lower the presser foot and continue stitching to the end of the zipper.

Refold crease; stitch along fold as close as possible to the zipper, making sure not to catch the zipper tape in your stitching. This will create a placket to cover the zipper.
 

Unzip the zipper. Place the tape face down against a 17 ½” edge of the 17 ½” X 11 ½” rectangle and pin well. Stitch as close as possible to the zipper teeth. This time, when you reach the zipper pull, carefully zip the zipper until the zipper pull is behind your needle. Continue stitching to the end of the zipper. Zip the zipper, place pillow back right side up, and press well.

You should have a 17 ½” X 17 ½” square (if slightly larger, trim to measure 17 1/2″ X 17 1/2″). Baste along side edges to hold zipper together when you assemble the pillow cover.

Place the appliqués:

Place your pillow front right side up. Place the pillow back on top with the right side facing down, the zipper towards the top edge, and the edges aligned. You should be able to see your front appliqués through the white fabric of the pillow back. Use a removable fabric marker–I recommend a Hera Marker or other creasing tool–and your ruler to trace lines along the bottom and sides of the word on the front of the cover. These will be your guidelines for placing the appliqués on the back. Turn the pillow back right side up and use the guidelines to place your back appliqués; the letters should be backwards. When you are satisfied with your placement, use your iron to fuse them in place. Stitch around appliqués using your machine or by hand.


Tip: If you use a fabric marker or pencil to make your placement guidelines, make sure you remove your markings before you use your iron to fuse the appliques in place! This is why I prefer to use a creasing tool for this step–I don’t need to remove any markings before pressing.

Step 5: Assemble the Pillow Cover:

Place pillow front cover and back cover together, right sides together. Make sure the zipper is unzipped a few inches. Align edges and pin well. Stitch along edges with a ¼” seam allowance. If you wish, finish the edges with a zigzag stitch. Unzip zipper all the way and turn cover right side out. Insert an 18” X 18” pillow form and you’re done!


This pattern will yield one cover for an 18” X 18” pillow. I recommend making several—have fun matching typefaces to the character of different fabric collections!

  Casey York
{www.casey-york.com}

Read With Me Quilt



Hi Moda Bake Shop Readers!!  I’m Melissa Corry from  Happy Quilting and I am so excited to be back here at the Moda Bake Shop to share my Read With Me quilt!! This fun twist on a standard “book” quilt uses typography and adorable quilting to add a whimsical touch.  Adding quilted titles of my families books makes this quilt a treasured heirloom.  I hope you enjoy the tutorial and even more, I hope you enjoy creating your own Read With Me quilt!!

To make your own Read With Me quilt you will need :

1 Noteworthy Jell Roll
2 Yards of Moda Bella Solid White
1/2 Yard of Moda Bella Solid Black

4 Yards of your favorite print for Backing

Applique Templates (at the end of the tutorial)
1/2 yard of Heat N Bond
Twin size or 68″ x 82″ piece of Batting

Got your Ingredient’s, let’s get piecing!!

STEP 1 – CUTTING


Start by breaking out that jelly roll.  Choose 7 strips and set them aside to be used for your binding.  I choose to use the “white” strips for my binding.

From the remaining jelly roll strips, alternating prints and colors for each group cut
   (4) 2 1/2″ x 6 1/2″ rectangles
   (4) 2 1/2″ x 8 1/2″ rectangles
   (4) 2 1/2″ x 9 1/2″ rectangles
   (24) 2 1/2″ x 10 1/2″ rectangles
   (28) 2 1/2″ x 11 1/2″ rectangles
   (28) 2 1/2″ x 12 1/2″ rectangles


From your white yardage cut the following
   (10) 5 1/2″ x Width of Fabric Strips
   (4) 3″ x 15″ rectangles
   (4) 2 1/2″ x 6″ rectangles
   (4) 1 1/2″ x 6″ rectangles
   (36) 1 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ rectangles
   (8) 2 1/2″ x 3 1/2″ rectangles
   (32) 2 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ squares

STEP 2 – BLOCK A

Gather the following size pieces and lay them out as shown.
   (2) 2 1/2″ x 12 1/2″ print rectangles, (3) 2 1/2″ x 11 1/2″ rectangles, and (1) 2 1/2″ x 10 1/2″ rectangles
   (1) 2 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ solid square, and (3) 1 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ rectangle.



Lay the solid rectangles onto the tops of the print strips and sew a 1/4″ seam along the edges.  Press.

Sew the 6 columns together.  Start by placing the second column onto the first, sew a 1/4″ seam along the edge.  Then place the third column onto the now sewn together first and second columns and sew a 1/4″ seam and so on until all 6 columns are sewn together.  Press.

Repeat this step to make a total of 4 blocks each measuring 12 1/2″ x 12 1/2″.




STEP 3 – BLOCK B

Gather the following size pieces and lay them out as shown.
   (1) 2 1/2″ x 12 1/2″ print rectangles, (2) 2 1/2″ x 11 1/2″ rectangles, and (3) 2 1/2″ x 10 1/2″ rectangles
   (3) 2 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ solid square, and (2) 1 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ rectangle.


Lay the solid rectangles onto the tops of the print strips and sew a 1/4″ seam along the edges.  Press.

Sew the 6 columns together.  Start by placing the second column onto the first, sew a 1/4″ seam along the edge.  Then place the third column onto the now sewn together first and second columns and sew a 1/4″ seam and so on until all 6 columns are sewn together.  Press.

Repeat this step to make a total of 4 blocks each measuring 12 1/2″ x 12 1/2″.



STEP 4 – BLOCK C

Gather the following size pieces and lay them out as shown.
   (2) 2 1/2″ x 12 1/2″ print rectangles, (1) 2 1/2″ x 10 1/2″ rectangle, (1) 2 1/2″ x 9 1/2″ rectangle,
        (1) 2 1/2″ x 8 1/2″ rectangle and (1) 2 1/2″ x 6 1/2″ rectangle
   (2) 2 1/2″ x 3 1/2″ solid rectangles, (3) 2 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ solid square, and (3) 1 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ rectangle.




Lay the solid rectangles onto the tops of the print strips on either end of the strip and sew a 1/4″ seam along the edges.  Press.

Sew the 6 rows together.  Start by placing the second row onto the first, sew a 1/4″ seam along the edge.  Then place the third row onto the now sewn together first and second rpw and sew a 1/4″ seam and so on until all 6 rows are sewn together.  Press.

Repeat this step to make a total of 4 blocks each measuring 12 1/2″ x 12 1/2″.



STEP 5 – BLOCK D

Block D has an angled book.  To make this start by slicing a 3″ x 15″ solid rectangle in half diagonally.


Place a 2 1/2″ x 11 1/2″ print rectangle between the 2 triangles, taking care to center the strip.  Lay the strip onto the top triangle.  Sew a 1/4″ seam aligning the raw edges.  Press.  Lay the bottom triangle onto the strip and sew a 1/4″ seam aligning the raw edges.  Press.  Using the ends of the strip as a guide, trim the top and bottom of the unit even with the ends of the strip.

Now gather a 2 1/2″ x 6″ solid rectangle and a 1 1/2″ x 6″ solid rectangle.  Lay the 2 1/2″ strip along the bottom of the block and the /2″ strip along the top of the block aligning the raw edges.  Sew a 1/4″ seam along each edge and press.

Now all that is left is trimming.  The trimming has to be done one side at a time and needs to be precise or you will end up with a floating book 🙂
    Place your long ruler so the top left hand corner of the print strip aligns with the 4 1/4″ horizontal mark on your ruler and the bottom right hand corner of the print strip aligns with the 1/4″ horizontal mark on your ruler.  Trim along the right hand edge of your ruler.
    Place your long ruler so the right hand side of the block aligns with the 4 1/2″ vertical line on your ruler.  Trim along the left hand edge of your ruler.
     Place your long ruler so that the right hand side of the block aligns with the edge of the ruler, the left hand side of the block aligns with the 4 1/2″ vertical line and the bottom right hand corner of the print strip aligns with the 12 1/4″ horizontal mark on your ruler.  Trim along the top edge of the ruler.
     Place your long ruler so that the right hand side of the block aligns with the edge of the ruler, the left hand side of the block aligns with the 4 1/2″ vertical line and the top of the block aligns with the 12 1/2″ horizontal mark on your ruler.  Trim along the bottom edge of the ruler.

You know you will have trimmed correctly if the three corners of the book that are pointed out are 1/4″ away from the nearest edge.

Gather the following size pieces and lay them out as shown.

   (2) 2 1/2″ x 12 1/2″ print rectangles, (1) 2 1/2″ x 11 1/2″ rectangles, and (1) 2 1/2″ x 10 1/2″ rectangles, and a pieced angle book block.
   (1) 2 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ solid square, and (1) 1 1/2″ x 2 1/2″ rectangle.

Lay the solid rectangles onto the tops of the print strips and sew a 1/4″ seam along the edges.  Press.

Sew the 5 columns together.  Start by placing the second column onto the first, sew a 1/4″ seam along the edge.  Then place the third column onto the now sewn together first and second columns and sew a 1/4″ seam and so on until all 5 columns are sewn together.  Press.

Repeat this step to make a total of 4 blocks each measuring 12 1/2″ x 12 1/2″.


STEP 6 – APPLIQUE STRIPS


Now the blocks are done and you can move onto the applique.  If you are new to applique, and need a bit more instruction on how to do it, please see my video tutorial on Applique Basics here.    From your black yardage lined with Heat N Bond cut the following letters.  (use the templates at the end of the post or make your own if you prefer a different font.)

Grab the WOF strips cut in the beginning and cut them into the following pieces.  Sew the pieces end to end to create (2) 5 1/2 ” x 63 1/2″ strips to be used for the side borders, (2) 5 1/2″ x 58 1/2″ strips to be used for the top and bottom borders, and (3) 48 1/2″ strips to be used for the applique.  Set the border strips aside.

Fuse your applique onto the three strips as follows.  For the first strip, start the applique 1″ in from the left and space the applique out over 32″.  For the second strip, start the applique out 8 1/4″ from the left and space the applique out over 32″. And for the third strip, start the applique out 1″ from the right and space the applique out over 32″.

Secure stitch the applique.  It is much easier to do this while it is in a strip, verses once it is sewn into the quilt top.



STEP 7 – ASSEMBLING QUILT TOP

And now you are ready to put the top together.  Lay your 16 blocks out in 4 rows of 4.  You can use the same layout I did or your own, just whatever looks pleasing to your eye.


Once you have your layout, sew the rows together the same way you did with the blocks.  Lay the second block in each row on the first and stitch along the aligned edge.  Then add the 3rd block, and then the 4th.

Press your rows and then lay them back out adding the appliqued strips in between each row.

Sew the rows together.  Once again, use the same process as putting the blocks together.  Just sewing the second row onto the first, and then adding the third and so on until the rows are all sewn together.

Now gather your borders that were set aside.  Place the side borders along the sides of the quilt top.  Sew a 1/4″ seam along the edge, aligning as you go.  Press.  Then repeat the same process for the top and bottom border.  Press.

And your quilt top is finished!!


STEP 8 – FINISHING

Baste it, Quilt it, and Bind It.  I know, I make it sound so easy.  If you are new to finishing your quilt, I have created a video tutorial series that goes over the basics of each of these three steps.  You can find it at my blog 🙂   You will use the 7 strips you set aside at the beginning to do the binding.  I choose to quilt mine with a bit of a “Fairy Tale” scene.  I  used a water soluble pen to draw the basic sketch and then filled it in with all of my favorite FMQ designs.   The final touch of quilting that really made this quilt special was quilting a book  title of a family favorite onto each book.  To do that, I once again used a water soluble pen  and then quilt the titles in my very best loopy cursive 😉  To see more detailed quilted pictures see my blog 🙂



          One adorable 58″ x 73″ Read With Me Quilt that is sure to be a family favorite.  Whether you put it on a bed or just snuggle under it while reading stories, I hope it becomes a treasure.  Thank you so much for joining me and I hope you enjoyed the tutorial.  If you make your own Read With Me Quilt I would love to see it.  You can add it to my Inspired by Happy Quilting Flickr group here 🙂

Have a Happy Quilting Day!!

Melissa Corry
{happyquiltingmelissa.blogspot.com}

Spring Rainbows Quilt




1 1930s Colors Bella Solids Jelly Roll
1/2 yard Bella Solids Snow
1/2 yard Avalon Daisy (for backing)


This quilt is made in a truly improvisational style, which means minimal measuring and lots of free-wheeling cutting and sewing. Depending on how comfortable you are with this, you can measure a bit more as you go, but I like the slightly wonky, off-kilter effect of improvisation.

1. To start, unroll your jelly roll. Pull out one strip of each color. Cut each strip into approximately 3″-long pieces, then cut these pieces roughly in half (lengthwise). You’ll have lots of little strips of slightly different widths.

2. Then, freehand cut eight squares from the Bella Solids Snow. Make the squares approximately 2 1/2″-3″ each side. Don’t worry if they’re not perfectly square!

3. Sew together three of your small colorful strips along their long edges. Press the seam allowances to one side. Sew these three strips to one side of a square (they might be slightly wider or narrower than the square- that’s fine). 
4. Repeat on the opposite side of the square, then use a rotary cutter and ruler to trim the unit so it is exactly 6 1/2″ long. The strips and square might not be flush along the long edges- that’s fine.
5. Sew together approximately eight of the colorful strips along their long edges and press the seams to one side. Check to see if the strips are at least 6 1/2″ long; if not, add another strip. Also, make sure the strips are relatively flush along one side. Make another one of these 8-strip units for a total of two. 
6. Sew an 8-strip unit to the long edge of the 6 1/2″-long unit. Your 8-strip unit might be longer may have some extra length, that’s fine. Sew the other 8-strip unit to the opposite side of the unit. Press the seams to one side. 
Note: If your 6 1/2″-long unit wasn’t perfectly flush, line up and sew the two units together using a larger seam allowance as necessary to catch both units, then trim the seam allowance to 1/4″. This will give you a wonky, non-perpendicular effect.
7. Now trim the entire block so it is exactly 6 1/2″ square. Repeat to form seven more of these blocks. 
8. Now you’re going to create eight of the second type of block. Take one of each color strip from the jelly roll, and cut each strip into approximately 4″ to 4 1/2″-long strips. Cut these in half, similar to the freehand cutting you did before but with slightly longer strips. Also, cut five 2 1/2″-wide strips from the Bella Solids Snow, cutting from selvedge to selvedge. 
9. Sew together four of the colorful strips, pressing the seams to one side. Use a pair of scissors to freehand cut the edges so they are flush (but don’t worry about creating right angles).
10. Sew a white strip along the top of this unit, and trim with a pair of scissors to it’s roughly flush.
11. Repeat on the opposite end of the unit.  Trim this unit to exactly 6 1/2″ long, as you did with the other block type. Then sew white strips along the long edges, trimming with scissors so they’re flush, then cutting the unit to a perfect  6 1/2″ square when you’re done. Since I like some irregularity, I tried to cut so that the width of white varied in each block (you can also trim your strips shorter in some of the blocks to allow for more white).
12. Create eight of these blocks. Make four of them exactly as above, but for the other four, sew the first white strips on the long edges of the strip, so they end up like so:
13. Once you’ve created all sixteen blocks, it’s time to sew them together. You’ll want four rows of four blocks each, switching up the orientation of each block as shown. Press the seam allowances to one side, alternating the direction in each row.
14. Once you’ve created four rows, sew these rows together, lining up the seams. And the quilt top is finished!
15. Baste your little quilt and quilt as desired. I stitched one continuous spiral, starting at the center of the quilt, using white thread.


One cheery quilt, 24″ square. Perfect for use as a table topper!

Pippa Armbrester
{www.pippapatchwork.com}

Boho Honeycomb Quilt


Hi!  My name is Erica and I blog over at Kitchen Table Quilting.  I am so excited about Moda’s new honeycomb pre-cut and this is a fun, quick way to put them to good use.  There are no Y seams involved and it yields a generously sized lap quilt.


1 Honeycomb Hexagons in Natural
2 Boho Jelly Rolls
2 Yards Moda Bella in Sienna
4.5 Yards Boho Wild Child Rain
2/3 Yard Boho Basic Earth
Batting at least 80″x90″


1. Unroll your jelly rolls and put the matching strips into pairs.  You will need 36 pairs of strips.

 
2.  Leave the strips folded in half and subcut the first strip into pieces 5.75″, 8″, and 8″.  Since you left your strip folded, this will give you two pieces each time you cut.  CUT CAREFULLY.  There is very little wiggle room here.  
3.  Leaving the strip folded again, subcut the second strip in the pair into pieces 10.25″, 3.5″, and 5.75″.  
4.  Separate the strips into two piles.
  • Pile for the inner ring: two 3.5″ pieces, 2 of the 5.75″ pieces, 2 of the 8″ pieces.
  • Pile for the outer ring: two of the 5.75″ pieces, two of the 8″ pieces, two 10.25″ pieces.  

5.  Each honeycomb hexagon will need a set for the inner ring and a set for the outer ring.  Take a hexagon and sew a 3.5″ piece to the top and bottom of the hexagon.  Make sure to center your jelly roll piece over the side of the hexagon so a little bit hangs over on each side.

6.  Press and then trim two opposite sides by lining up your ruler with the side of the hexagon.  You only need to trim the two opposite sides because the other sides will be trimmed later.
It should now look like this.
7.  Add two 5.75″ pieces to the sides you just trimmed.
8.  Press and trim.
9.  Now add your 8″ pieces to the two remaining sides.  
10.  To trim down to a hexagon shape, line the 2.25″ inch mark on your ruler with the edge of your hexagon in the center.  Trim around each side.  

11.  Now, using a different print, add two 5.75″ pieces to two opposite sides of your hexagon, press, and trim.  

12.  Add the 8″ pieces, press, and trim.

13.  And then add the 10.25″ pieces, press, and trim just like before by lining up the 2.25″ mark on your ruller with the inner ring (the blue print here).  

14. Cut your solid yardage into seven inch x width of fabric strips.  You will need 9 strips, each strip yields 8 equilateral triangles.

15.  To make equilateral triangles, lay a 7 inch strip (folded in half) on your cutting mat.  Line up the 60 degree mark on your ruler with the top of the fabric.

16.  Cut along the edge of the ruler.

17.  Flip your ruler over and line up the 60 degree mark with the bottom of the fabric to make an equilateral triangle.

18.  Sew the triangle to one side of your hexagon by centering the triangle over one side of the hexagon.  A little of the solid fabric should hang over each side.  Once it has been sewn on and pressed, it should line up with the adjacent hexagon side as shown in the photo below.  
You will need 6 total hexagons with 1 triangle, we will call these the “B” hexagon.  It doesn’t matter which side you add the triangle to since they are all of the same.  

19.  Take the 30 remaining hexagons and add a triangle to the opposite side.

20.  You will need 24 total  of these “A” hexagons with 2 triangles added, so take the remaining 6 hexagons and we will add a third triangle.

21.  Add a third triangle to make three “C’ hexagons.

22.  And a third triangle to make three “D” hexagons.

23.  Arrange your blocks into this layout:

24.  Piece the horizontal rows together.  Do this by taking two hexagons at a time.

And flipping the hexagon on the right up to sew the parallel edge together.  
25. Sew the rows together to finish the quilt top.

26.  Once you have the finished quilt top, two of the sides will need to be trimmed.  Use your ruler and rotary cutter to square up the bottom of the quilt and make this edge straight.

27.  Baste, quilt, and bind as desired.

Finished size: 76″x80″

Erica Jackman
{kitchentablequilting.blogspot.com}

Noteworthy Labyrinth Quilt



Hello again!  This is Karin Vail from Cascade Quilts and I am happy to bring you my third Moda Bake Shop project!  This would look wonderul in just about any Moda collection!
I showed a preview picture of the pattern to a quilter friend of mine, and she said it looked like a labyrinth or maze, so the name was born.  This quilt came together pretty quickly – it looks complicated, but if you keep your consistent 1/4” seam, you should have no problems 🙂  This quilt top finishes at approx. 87”x87”.


2 jelly rolls (Noteworthy by Sweetwater)
3 1/2 yards Bella solids (Snow)
5 yards backing (#5500 15  ”Daisy” from Noteworthy collection)


We will be using 1/4” seam allowance throughout.

First, we’ll be cutting loads and loads of narrow strips from your Bella solid.

CUT:
8 WOF strips @ 1.75” for the border
66 WOF strips @ 1.5” wide for the sashing (30 are for your strip sets)
     Subcut 28 of the 1.5” strips into:
          45 pieces @ 16.5”
          50 @ 8”

Set aside 30 WOF @ 1.5” for your strip sets, and 8 WOF @ 1.5” for your sashing.

To get the most out of your solids, you can get two 16.5” pieces and one 8” piece from each WOF – so, from 22 strips, cut 44 pieces @ 16.5” and 22 pieces @ 8” – then from one strip, cut 1 piece @ 16.5” and 3 pieces @ 8” – then from 5 strips, cut 25 more pieces @ 8”.   This should give you the least amount of waste.

Take the remaining eight 1.5” strips and join into 4 longer strips @ 88” (sashing strip to join the rows together.)

Join the eight WOF 1.75” strips into 4 @ 88” for your border.

Open your two jelly rolls and choose 30 strips from each jelly roll for a total of 60 strips.  Some of the remaining jelly roll strips will be used for scrappy binding, so keep that in mind when choosing strips.  Also keep in mind what you choose if you might want to make matching pillows. Unfortunately, I left out the white/white prints and lower value prints and didn’t think about using the remaining for pillows until the top was already all assembled.  I wish I would have thought ahead further so I could have a matching pillow or two.

Anyhow, for each of the strip sets, you will choose 3 jelly roll strips and join together alternating with 2 of the 1.5” solid strips.  Press all seams to one side.

You will sew together 20 of these strips sets.  Each strip set should measure 8.5” wide.

Cut each strip set into five 8.5” squares.  There will be VERY LITTLE waste here, so cut cautiously.  After you have cut all your strip sets into 8.5” squares, you will take pairs keeping the seams orientated in the same direction, and cut them diagonally in opposing directions.

It is imperitive that you cut the angles in opposing directions for this to work.

Now, swap the upper pieces from each block and align and you will start to see the sub-block emerging!

If you pressed the seams to one side, and kept them in the same direction when you cut the blocks, your seams will all nest pefectly when you go to join the triangles back into a square!  The bias edge helps a LOT to make sure your seams line up.

Sew the blocks together and press.  You can press open or to one side here, your choice.  I chose to press to the side because it’s faster 🙂

At this point, carefully trim your blocks so they are 8” square.  You should have VERY little to trim, if anything at all.  The blocks will go together much nicer if these are all nice and square though 🙂
Continue cutting/sewing your sub-blocks – you should have a total of 100 for this quilt.

To assemble the 25 blocks, you will stitch an 8” x 1.5” solid between pairs of sub-blocks, press toward the solid.  Then, assemble pairs of those with the 16.5” x 1.5” strip for your finished blocks.  There will be 25 total.  Using your final twenty 16.5” x 1.5” strips, sew the blocks into rows of 5 – then use your 1.5” x 88” strips to join your rows.  Finally, use your final four 1.75”x 88” strips to add a border for a final quilt top finish of 87”x87”.

Now you can layer, baste, quilt, and bind using 9 of your remaining jelly roll strips!  (You will have 11 leftover jelly roll strips from the 2 jelly rolls and a small amount of the solid – maybe make some pillows to match?!)


One beautiful 87”x87” quilt!

Hop on over to my website to see the quilt in it’s post-washed crinkly goodness!

{cascadequilts.com}

Searching the Moda Bake Shop

Desperately seeking cupcakes! No, not really, but we have heard (and noticed) that the search function on the Moda Bake Shop is not working. This blog is hosted by Blogger and the search problem seems to be quite widespread. We know you can’t live without your recipes so Oda May has a workaround for you until the issue is corrected.

It’s very easy…do a Google search! The search function is basically a Google search that is restricted to just this blog. So if you are looking for an Easter project here on the Bake Shop, go to Google and type “Moda Bake Shop” + “Easter.” The relevant projects will be at the top of the results.